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Network printer through switch

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March 10, 2010 6:21:37 PM

I successfully connect to laser printer (IP address .113) when working through a router.

But other PC's outside the router can't print, so I tried to replace the router with an intelligent switch, but can't get printer to work with any PC. Tried ipconfig /all but cant see the printer.

Ideas anyone ?

More about : network printer switch

Anonymous
March 10, 2010 6:28:21 PM

What are the full IP addresses of the PC's & the printer?
March 10, 2010 6:37:02 PM

Printer is 192.168.1.113
PC is 192.168.1.100
local Router 192.168.1.1
and internet router 192.168.1.2
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Anonymous
March 10, 2010 6:38:38 PM

Why do you have a local router & a internet router? How are they connected?
March 10, 2010 6:49:19 PM

I run broadband with modem/router at head end, behind which sits 24 port switch.
In my office location, I have 3 network printers, and use a second router as the only way to get PC to talk to these printers, however I'm not bale to do network printing from any other PC sitting outside the local router, so wanted to replace that router with a switch. When switch is in place I can get internet access OK, but no printing at all. Sorry for long answer !
March 10, 2010 10:45:53 PM

dfraser314 said:
I run broadband with modem/router at head end, behind which sits 24 port switch.
In my office location, I have 3 network printers, and use a second router as the only way to get PC to talk to these printers, however I'm not bale to do network printing from any other PC sitting outside the local router, so wanted to replace that router with a switch. When switch is in place I can get internet access OK, but no printing at all. Sorry for long answer !


"use a second router as the only way to get PC to talk to these printers"

That part I don't understand. How does having a second internal router “get (the) PC to talk to these printers”? Ironically, right now it's doing just the opposite. Assuming that router is connected to the rest of your network over its WAN port, any devices behind it are inaccessible to any devices on the WAN side (as it should be). The WAN's firewall is intended to protect that router's network, in the same way your Internet router’s WAN is protecting your greater local network w/ its firewall. So based on how you've configured it, it's doing exactly what it was designed to do; prevent access from outside threats.

Most of the time this is the last thing you want to do. Sometimes ppl use additional routers to add more LAN ports, but in those cases you should be connecting one router to the other LAN to LAN (and disabling its DHCP server as well), not using the second router’s WAN port, because it creates this very problem.

So unless you can explain why you need that additional network w/ that second internal router, I don’t see the point of having it.


March 11, 2010 8:31:52 AM

I dont understand either. I'm using the Linksys WRT 3000N because I cant get printing otherwise. I want to replace the router with the switch but printing just wont happen. As suggested I switched off DHCP in the Linksys router but it makes no difference. Priniting continues to work inside but cant get at the printer from outside.
I agree the router is doing its job. I only wish I could get the switch to do its job, is where we came in.
March 11, 2010 10:59:43 AM

dfraser314 said:
I dont understand either. I'm using the Linksys WRT 3000N because I cant get printing otherwise. I want to replace the router with the switch but printing just wont happen. As suggested I switched off DHCP in the Linksys router but it makes no difference. Priniting continues to work inside but cant get at the printer from outside.
I agree the router is doing its job. I only wish I could get the switch to do its job, is where we came in.


Normally you would have an Internet router with all your network devices attached to its switch. Let's say there are only two devices behind that router, a PC and a printer, each connected to an ethernet port on that router's switch. That’s all that’s needed. No additional routers whatsoever. You're telling me this doesn’t work? How can that be? 99.99% of the world is connected this way.

The only issue becomes if you exhaust all those ports and need to add more. You just patch another switch to the router's switch and go on your merry way. I still don't see why this would cause problems.

But then sometimes ppl want to reuse the switch they have from another router rather than buying a standalone switch, which is fine. Again, you connect that second router to the internet router, LAN to LAN, and disable the second router's DHCP server. That's it. It's just a switch now. That doesn't work?!

I'm just getting the impression that some detail is being left out that would make all this clear. Like maybe the printer is actually wireless, and maybe your internet router is wire-only, and you needed this second router to add a wireless access point, etc. Some detail that explains this need for a second router. Let's assume we never understand what's happening there w/ that second router. You can always just buy a $10 standalone/dedicated switch if you need more LAN port on that internet router. That has to work, it always does. Or better yet, just patch the printer to the internet router. Now it doesn’t matter what you do in terms of adding another router. The printer should be accessible to anyone, even PCs behind another router’s WAN port.

Again, you're not explaining why that second router is in the picture. You just insist it must be, but then have problems. Something is missing here in terms of your description. Heck, draw a detailed picture if you must, scan it, and post it.


March 11, 2010 11:45:02 AM

You folks are very patient and I'm not hiding anything, just dont want to complicate the picture any more than I have to.
Story is:
Netgear router with single port sits in the loft on the incoming broadband line, behind this router sits a 24 port Dlink switch and each room in house (14) is plugged into the switch. Everything works.
In the office I have a B&W laser, Colour Laser and scanner/deskjet, a PC and sometimes a laptop, all wired no wireless. I need to print on any printer in the office from office PC or from any other wired access point in another room. Tried connecting the 3 printers and PC through a local 5 port switch in the office - but did not work, tried connecting the 5 port switch to the 24 port switch with X cable - still no joy. Tried a different 5 port switch just to be sure - still no joy.
In frustration I replace the local 5 port switch with a Linksys router which I had lying around, and hey presto I can print to all 3 printers from office PC, BUT everything outside the Linksys cannot see the printers, which I understand as the router is doing its job. But why will switch not work ? Really frustrating !!
March 11, 2010 12:06:46 PM

Give the specific model of 24-port d-link switch.

And Netgear router while you're at it (probably not relevant, but to complete the picture).

And that Linksys is patched to the ethernet port in that room over its WAN port, correct?
March 11, 2010 12:23:36 PM

Just been to the loft,
its D Link 1016D - 16 port switch
Netgear ADSL2+ DM111PSP
Lonksys is linked through WAN port to D Link using X cable
March 11, 2010 12:50:56 PM

dfraser314 said:
Just been to the loft,
its D Link 1016D - 16 port switch
Netgear ADSL2+ DM111PSP
Lonksys is linked through WAN port to D Link using X cable


Hmm, a crossover cable..., with modern equipment a crossover cable is unnecessary. Virtually all use auto-mdix to automatically configure the connection properly. If you were using a crossover when connected LAN to LAN, try using a standard network cable instead.
March 11, 2010 12:53:52 PM

I had originally got a regular cable, but did not work, then someone suggested I use a X cable anyway.
March 11, 2010 1:16:36 PM

dfraser314 said:
I had originally got a regular cable, but did not work, then someone suggested I use a X cable anyway.


What happens if you plug either the PC or printer directly into the room's ethernet port (the same one the router is now using), do they work? Are they accessible throughout the home?
March 11, 2010 1:47:41 PM

When PC plugged in directly I can see other PC's on the network and get internet access.

When plugging a printer in I cannot get printing from another PC on the network.
If I knew how to upload a diagram I'd show you what the layout is like.
March 11, 2010 2:29:01 PM

dfraser314 said:
When PC plugged in directly I can see other PC's on the network and get internet access.

When plugging a printer in I cannot get printing from another PC on the network.
If I knew how to upload a diagram I'd show you what the layout is like.


Ok, I think we may be on to something here. So you're telling me that only the **PRINTER** has a problem when plugged directly into the ethernet port in the room. But if you pull that printer and instead directly plug in a PC, that PC works.

If that’s true, then that means this is not a hardware issue. If it works for one, it should work for all. What I suspect is that the printer is misconfigured, maybe using an IP address that’s not in the same network as the rest of your devices. Then when you place it behind the router, it happens to be a valid IP within that router’s network, and whalla, you now have access.

You need to go to the printer and tell if it’s using DHCP or has a static IP assignment, and if so, what that is.

Btw, I know you said the following previously...

Printer is 192.168.1.113
PC is 192.168.1.100
local Router 192.168.1.1
and internet router 192.168.1.2


But even that's confusing since if the printer has been placed behind a second router, it should be using a different network (e.g., 192.168.2.x). Those values would only make sense if the second router was connected LAN to LAN and thus every device would be on the same network.

So that's why I want you to double check.

March 11, 2010 3:13:45 PM

HP laserjet 192.168.1.113 - running under JetDirect with DHCP
Ricoh colour Laser 192.168.1.102 - dont know where it got this address.
HP scan/deskjet cant find IP address. It appears to be addressed by its unique name

All of above working behind the Linksys router
March 11, 2010 6:40:52 PM

This may seem a daft question, but it part of my problem diagnostics from above.
If I connect my PC direct to my printer with the network cable should I be able to print ?
I've tried and it does not !
Anonymous
March 11, 2010 7:33:40 PM

If you used a crossover cable and the IP address of the PC is in the same address range as the printer.
March 11, 2010 7:49:21 PM

dfraser314 said:
This may seem a daft question, but it part of my problem diagnostics from above.
If I connect my PC direct to my printer with the network cable should I be able to print ?
I've tried and it does not !


I wouldn't think so. When the two are connected directly the printer can't be configured over DHCP because there is no DHCP server available under that configuration. So it doesn't have a valid IP address and hence can't be reached. You would have to manually update the printer's TCP/IP configuration w/ a valid IP address in the same range as your PC (i.e., both in the 192.168.1.x network).

March 11, 2010 8:07:37 PM

OP, this is one that I think is only going to be solved w/ a direct conversation, where we can have some immediate feedback and work it through. Because right now it makes no sense. I'll send you my IM addresses if interested.
Anonymous
March 11, 2010 8:36:07 PM

You should set Static IP addresses on the printers that are outside of the DHCP range.
March 12, 2010 3:23:20 PM

Thanks guys. I'll give this ago over the weekend and let you know progress.
!