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digital camera rec for an old-timer?

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Anonymous
December 17, 2004 10:33:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi,

I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been out of
photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital. Can
anyone recommend a good camera?

I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital SLR's
are still *quite* pricey), but something that will give me a fair
amount of image control, quality images for enlargement (8x10), good
quality manufacture.

Many thanks for all advice!

sp
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 3:29:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sounds like the best bet may be to stick with my FE2 (I still have both
cameras and all lenses) and save up for the digital equipment... I do
like the idea of being able to work with my own images straight in
photoshop (no darkroom at home.)

Thanks to all for the advice! sp
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 6:18:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ro222000@yahoo.com writes:

> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
> photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
> Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides.
[...]
> I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital SLR's
> are still *quite* pricey)

If you're looking to restart your hobby, yes you are looking for SLR.

If you really can't wait to save up the money for a DSLR, I suggest
starting with low expectations. Get a cheap point+shoot+wait camera
like the Canon A75, and start off just shooting daylight subjects that
don't move very much. If that doesn't do it for you, buy a film SLR at
a used camera shop.

New DSLRs without lenses can be had for $800 or so. That's as low as it
gets.

--

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Anonymous
December 17, 2004 6:46:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ro222000@yahoo.com wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
> photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
> Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been out of
> photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
> again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital.
> Can anyone recommend a good camera?
>
> I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital SLR's
> are still *quite* pricey), but something that will give me a fair
> amount of image control, quality images for enlargement (8x10), good
> quality manufacture.
>
> Many thanks for all advice!
>
> sp

Due you still have your Nikon equipment, especially the lenses?

If so I suspect you will like one of the Nikon DSLR's.

If not both Canon and Nikon have some very nice DSLR's. You can get
some good ones for less than $1,000 and for a little more you can get even
better. The most recent models in the $1,500 range are likely to make you
very pleased.

Quality cost just like it does in traditional film. I suspect you will
not be satisfied with most non-SLR digitals. Some are very good, but they
lack the features you are use to. You are likely to find the delay between
shutter press and image recording of most of them too long. The viewfinders
may leave you wanting. Of course you can and should check this out for
yourself before you make any final decisions.



--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 6:46:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Joseph Meehan wrote:
> ro222000@yahoo.com wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
>> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in
>> landscape photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses
>> were the Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been
>> out of
>> photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
>> again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital.
>> Can anyone recommend a good camera?
>>
>> I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital
>> SLR's are still *quite* pricey), but something that will give me a
>> fair
>> amount of image control, quality images for enlargement (8x10), good
>> quality manufacture.
>>
>> Many thanks for all advice!
>>
>> sp
>
> Due you still have your Nikon equipment, especially the lenses?
>
> If so I suspect you will like one of the Nikon DSLR's.
>
> If not both Canon and Nikon have some very nice DSLR's. You can
> get some good ones for less than $1,000 and for a little more you can
> get even better. The most recent models in the $1,500 range are
> likely to make you very pleased.
>
> Quality cost just like it does in traditional film. I suspect you
> will not be satisfied with most non-SLR digitals. Some are very
> good, but they lack the features you are use to. You are likely to
> find the delay between shutter press and image recording of most of
> them too long. The viewfinders may leave you wanting. Of course you
> can and should check this out for yourself before you make any final
> decisions.

Aside from the shutter lag interfering with "action" photography, a
camera like the Nikon CP8700 offers all the resolution, image control
and quality, and convenience of operation most people would demand, and
all in a lightweight package. Any recent topline non-dSLR will have
similar features. It's not an onerous task, but a joyous one, choosing
among the many available delights. The only limits are your pocketbook
and time.


--
Frank ess
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 7:02:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ro222000@yahoo.com wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
> photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
> Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been out of
> photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
> again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital.
> Can anyone recommend a good camera?

Nikon Coolpix 8400 - 24mm - 85mm zoom, 8MP which will easily print at up
to 8 x 10 if not further. A lot lighter than the SLR kit you used to have
and much easier to carry around. Fast auto-focus (compared to the
majority of non-SLRs). For candids, this camera has a swivel LCD finder,
so there's no need to hold the camera to your eye - hold it at waist level
and the subject will be far less aware of it.

Unfortunately, most likely you will find that today's Nikon DSLRs will not
function full with your older lenses, making the DSLR route an expensive
one.

Cheers,
David
December 17, 2004 7:21:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

You may want to take a look at www.dpreview and look at the reviews and use
their Buying Guide (left frame) to help you thru the maze.

Bob S.


<ro222000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103297628.701933.277320@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi,
>
> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
> photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
> Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been out of
> photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
> again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital. Can
> anyone recommend a good camera?
>
> I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital SLR's
> are still *quite* pricey), but something that will give me a fair
> amount of image control, quality images for enlargement (8x10), good
> quality manufacture.
>
> Many thanks for all advice!
>
> sp
>
December 18, 2004 12:10:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ro222000@yahoo.com wrote in news:1103297628.701933.277320
@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com:

> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
>

I used to shoot with an FM2, and before that an FM. My favorite lenses were
the 24mm and the 180/2.8. I used to shoot a lot of kodachrome.

I got a Coolpix 5000, which has pretty decent image quality. What it lacks,
based on my background, is a manual focus control, and the ability to
change the aperature and the shutter at the same time.

I like my CP, but I'm still missing something. Even if you still have your
lenses, they don't count for much, since the D70, for instance, won't meter
with them. They will sell on ebay, though.

I'm convinced that I need an SLR: My current short list includes the Nikon
D70, the Canon 20D, and the Olympus E1. I haven't done any research on the
last one yet, but I'm impressed with the way it looks and feels.

Bob

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December 18, 2004 4:44:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<ro222000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103315386.044995.222950@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
> Sounds like the best bet may be to stick with my FE2 (I still have both
> cameras and all lenses) and save up for the digital equipment... I do
> like the idea of being able to work with my own images straight in
> photoshop (no darkroom at home.)
>
> Thanks to all for the advice! sp
>

If you don't shoot a lot and do not require immediate viewing of your
images, have you thought of buying a film scanner? My warehouse club gives
me Kodak processing and proofing at $3.99 for 24 4x6 exposures, and only a
dollar more for 5x7s. One day turnaround.

For about $500 you could get a film scanner that would yield better quality
images than most DSLRs, and you could continue to exploit your existing
camera and lenses.

That is what I have done, with my 6 Pentax bodies and 15 prime Pentax
lenses. I did buy a 2.3 MP used digital camera on eBay for $60.00, for
those times that I absolutely must have an immediate image. The digicam (a
Ricoh RDC-5300) arrived looking like it had never been out of the box. It
sold for $699.99 when it was new. I've had OFOTO.COM print photos up to 8 x
10 size from this wimpy little 2.3 MP camera, and they were surprisingly
good.

My point is that there ARE ways to exploit digital imaging without going
broke. I have too much invested in my film cameras, lenses and accessories
to chuck it now. You sound like you might be in a similar situation.

Another even cheaper way to dabble in digital imaging is to have your
processor scan your negs and put them on a CD. Kodak's Picture CD service
will provide you with images that are about the equivalent of a 2 MP
digicam, for just a few dollars per roll. You can edit those images on your
computer (I use Paint Shop Pro) and you can upload them to OFOTO or take
them to a one hour printer. If you decide to get more involved, you can
then get your own scanner (Nikon Coolscan and Minolta DiMage are two
excellent choices) and you can make higher-resolution scans. If you can
live without the immediacy factor of digital, and if the cost of film and
processing are not major expenses for you, you can actually end up with
images that outdo those made by even the best of today's digicams.

I originally planned to dump film, and I am glad that I did not do so. With
the passing of time, I have had a cooler head and have moderated my approach
to photography so I now have the best of both worlds. The one conclusion
that I have come to is that it should not be an "either-or" proposition.
Shoot both. Enjoy life!
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 7:21:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Lots of advise...good for the most part...but limited as few of us have
tried enough different cameras to have an informed opinion. It won't help to
know that with your first camera you will find...not so much what you
like...but mostly what you don't like. Oh well. There is nowhere to get good
advise...I have never been in a camera store where I was told that they
don't sell the best...even when all they had was Chinon and the like. You
can, however, get good information. Go to www.dpreview.com and use their
comparative search database. Put in what you think will be important to you
and it will show you what cameras have those features.

If you still have your glass then your choices are limited...and that is a
good thing because it's limited to pretty good cameras. Nikon, Kodak, and
Fuji. Pricewise....new Nikons and Fujis have been announced so prices are
dropping on current models. In your boat I would do a Google for a
refurbished Nikon and see if it is in your price range. OK...I took my own
advise and found a Nikon D-70 that looks pretty sweet. If you have the glass
you can get in pretty cheap....but I have not found refurbs in the US.
Still...might be worth looking at.


<ro222000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103297628.701933.277320@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi,
>
> I used to do quite a bit of photography years ago: shot with a Nikon
> FE2 and FA, had a whole set of lenses, specialized mostly in landscape
> photos, street candid, and portraiture. My favorite lenses were the
> Nikon 24mm and 105mm, and I shot mostly slides. I've been out of
> photography for quite a few years now, but am looking to pick it up
> again as the serious hobby it once was and want to move to digital. Can
> anyone recommend a good camera?
>
> I'm not necessarily looking for an SLR yet (I'm guessing digital SLR's
> are still *quite* pricey), but something that will give me a fair
> amount of image control, quality images for enlargement (8x10), good
> quality manufacture.
>
> Many thanks for all advice!
>
> sp
>
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:22:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 21:10:40 -0600, in rec.photo.digital bob
<usenetMAPS@2fiddles.com> wrote:

>I got a Coolpix 5000, which has pretty decent image quality. What it lacks,
>based on my background, is a manual focus control, and the ability to
>change the aperature and the shutter at the same time.

You missed something here as the CP-5000 has a fully manual mode that lets
you independently set aperture and shutter speed, see p94 of the manual.
Manual focus is there as well, see p98. It's not infinitely adjustable, but
it is there. At least the 5000 still has the distance readout. Nikon did
away with that on my 5700. Makes it a lot tougher to reset the MF to the
same value or note down what the setting is, imo.

>I like my CP, but I'm still missing something. Even if you still have your
>lenses, they don't count for much, since the D70, for instance, won't meter
>with them. They will sell on ebay, though.

Depending on the lens they may be able to be chipped.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 1:48:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ro222000@yahoo.com wrote:
> Sounds like the best bet may be to stick with my FE2 (I still have
> both cameras and all lenses) and save up for the digital equipment...
> I do like the idea of being able to work with my own images straight
> in photoshop (no darkroom at home.)
>
> Thanks to all for the advice! sp

An alternative - look for a second-hand Nikon Coolpix 990, 995 or 4500.
(If you go 990 be sure to check the mode switch). The swivel body design
will provide some photo opportunities you haven't though of before, and
buying second-hand reduces the cost but provides some good experience for
you. Print quality is OK up to 8 x 10.

Cheers,
David
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 1:48:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 10:48:32 -0000, in rec.photo.digital "David J Taylor"
<david-taylor@invalid.com> wrote:

>An alternative - look for a second-hand Nikon Coolpix 990, 995 or 4500.
>(If you go 990 be sure to check the mode switch).
Good advice. Also, from my more recent experience with my 990 sitting
around in a file cabinet drawer at work these days getting very sporadic
use, I've found the Command Dial can be similarly suspect. In my case the
judicial application of Radio Shack Tuner-Cleaner, as used on the Mode
Switch for years, helps immensely.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
http://EdwardGRuf.com
December 18, 2004 2:24:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote in
news:io38s0dj7t2djivvsrh8om6j46i55jmjnc@4ax.com:

>>I got a Coolpix 5000, which has pretty decent image quality. What it
>>lacks, based on my background, is a manual focus control, and the
>>ability to change the aperature and the shutter at the same time.
>
> You missed something here as the CP-5000 has a fully manual mode that
> lets you independently set aperture and shutter speed, see p94 of the
> manual. Manual focus is there as well, see p98. It's not infinitely
> adjustable, but
>

I use manual mode, but since there's only one dial, you can only control
either the aperature *or* the shutter, at any given moment. With my FM2 I
could change the shutter dial with one hand, while changing the aperature
with the other. The D70 has two command dials, and in manual mode one
changes aperature while the other changes shutter. That's a feature I
would appreciate.

Likewise, there is a manual focus control, but it's the same control
wheel that's used for setting aperature and shutter. With the dSLRs, the
manual focus is done with a mechanical focus ring on the lens (like the
zoom ring).

The controls on the 5000 are all there, and all completely functional,
just not as easy or as fast to use. If it was up to me, I'd have them
make an ISO dial and an exposure compensation wheel, too. ;-)

Bob

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Anonymous
December 18, 2004 3:49:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 11:24:12 -0600, in rec.photo.digital bob
<usenetMAPS@2fiddles.com> wrote:


>I use manual mode, but since there's only one dial, you can only control
>either the aperature *or* the shutter, at any given moment. With my FM2 I
>could change the shutter dial with one hand, while changing the aperature
>with the other. The D70 has two command dials, and in manual mode one
>changes aperature while the other changes shutter. That's a feature I
>would appreciate.

Ok, I'm new to the D70, coming from the 5700. All it takes is a press of
the mode button to go back and forth. At least in my use I can't see
changing both simultaneously, but you must. Funny coming from the 5700 and
a 990 before I get frustrated when I use aperture priority and rotate the
back wheel and nothing happens. :-)
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 4:44:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <pYLwd.2799$Z47.1606@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net>,
jeremy@nospam.com says...
>
> <ro222000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1103315386.044995.222950@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > Sounds like the best bet may be to stick with my FE2 (I still have both
> > cameras and all lenses) and save up for the digital equipment... I do
> > like the idea of being able to work with my own images straight in
> > photoshop (no darkroom at home.)
> >
> > Thanks to all for the advice! sp
> >
>
> If you don't shoot a lot and do not require immediate viewing of your
> images, have you thought of buying a film scanner? My warehouse club gives
> me Kodak processing and proofing at $3.99 for 24 4x6 exposures, and only a
> dollar more for 5x7s. One day turnaround.
>
> For about $500 you could get a film scanner that would yield better quality
> images than most DSLRs, and you could continue to exploit your existing
> camera and lenses.
>
This *may* be right for you, but in my view is only justified if:

1. your primary need is to scan old slides and negs which are very
important to you.

and

2. you have a *lot* of spare time to spend scanning and using Photoshop
to adjust the scans and even more time to learn it all. At least much of
this learning will be useful when you shift to digital anyway unless you
are happy with lab adjusted prints.

and

3. you have patience to wait while the price of DLSRs slowly comes down
and your bank balance grows. As has been suggested in another post,
something like a Canon A75 can help. That is where I am now (but I only
bought an A310) and I will probably buy a 20D next year as I have five EF
lenses. I will probably still use a bit of film on wideangle, at least
until I get some more lenses.

> That is what I have done, with my 6 Pentax bodies and 15 prime Pentax
> lenses. I did buy a 2.3 MP used digital camera on eBay for $60.00, for
> those times that I absolutely must have an immediate image. The digicam (a
> Ricoh RDC-5300) arrived looking like it had never been out of the box. It
> sold for $699.99 when it was new. I've had OFOTO.COM print photos up to 8 x
> 10 size from this wimpy little 2.3 MP camera, and they were surprisingly
> good.
>


> My point is that there ARE ways to exploit digital imaging without going
> broke. I have too much invested in my film cameras, lenses and accessories
> to chuck it now. You sound like you might be in a similar situation.
>
> Another even cheaper way to dabble in digital imaging is to have your
> processor scan your negs and put them on a CD. Kodak's Picture CD service
> will provide you with images that are about the equivalent of a 2 MP
> digicam, for just a few dollars per roll. You can edit those images on your
> computer (I use Paint Shop Pro) and you can upload them to OFOTO or take
> them to a one hour printer. If you decide to get more involved, you can
> then get your own scanner (Nikon Coolscan and Minolta DiMage are two
> excellent choices) and you can make higher-resolution scans. If you can
> live without the immediacy factor of digital, and if the cost of film and
> processing are not major expenses for you, you can actually end up with
> images that outdo those made by even the best of today's digicams.
>
> I originally planned to dump film, and I am glad that I did not do so. With
> the passing of time, I have had a cooler head and have moderated my approach
> to photography so I now have the best of both worlds. The one conclusion
> that I have come to is that it should not be an "either-or" proposition.
> Shoot both. Enjoy life!
December 18, 2004 7:18:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote in
news:hkq8s0pdqu786i6ls7snbmumn4vpf6prur@4ax.com:

> Ok, I'm new to the D70, coming from the 5700. All it takes is a press
> of the mode button to go back and forth. At least in my use I can't
> see changing both simultaneously, but you must.


I guess it's not really a big deal: Maybe not even an actual annoyance. I
would do that, for instance, if I had last used the camera outdoors with a
fast shutter and a small aperature, and then I was inside and needed to
quickly set it up with a large aperature and a slow shutter. I would twist
both controls quickly and largely by feel.

Sometimes too, I might want to change through a variety of
aperature/shutter combinations to capture a several different depth of
fields. Being able to move the aperature and shutter opposite directions,
one stop at a time, by feel, can be handy.

Bob

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