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Internet Sharing from LAN to wireless router

Last response: in Networking
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March 11, 2010 5:56:46 PM

Hi

At my school we have a system that allows only one computer to be connected, I have a desktop configured (Vista home premium SP2) via LAN, I have a Netgear router (g) which I want to use to share my internet connection so I can connect my mac at the same time. I have been able to connect the desktop to the wired and wireless network at the same time. I have tried some fiddling around but unsuccessfully so far.

Also we have a HTTP proxy which is fairly simple but will I need to put the proxy details into the router or not?

Will not putting the settings into the router mean that I need to enter them into my mac instead?


Many Thanks

ccowan
March 11, 2010 6:36:40 PM

If the school won't let you connect a router directly to the network then the easiest solution is to put another nic in your computer, plug in a crossover cable between the pc and the mac and configure the pc with internet connection sharing (ICS). Essentially you turn your pc into a gateway for the mac. You could also plug the router into the pc using the switch port, not the wan port, if you want to plug in more computers. You could use the wan port but then that makes sharing files a little tougher as you will be dealing with two networks then.
March 11, 2010 10:33:52 PM

ccowan said:
I have been able to connect the desktop to the wired and wireless network at the same time. I have tried some fiddling around but unsuccessfully so far.


I don't understand. Why would you have the desktop connected to two networks at the same time? Are you trying to use it as a bridge? Why if you have a router? You just connect the WAN port of the router to the schools' LAN, then use wire or wireless to connect the desktop and Mac to the router, and off you go.

What am I missing?

Is this an attempt to circumvent some requirement that only your desktop can be connected to their network, not a router (something that seems to be common these days)? Because if it is, and your trying to use something like ICS to bridge (which you would have to do, you can’t just bridge the connections, you need a gateway like ICS as well), then it might just be simpler to clone your desktop MAC address to the router and have it pretend to be your desktop.

March 12, 2010 8:52:46 AM

eibgrad said:
I don't understand. Why would you have the desktop connected to two networks at the same time? Are you trying to use it as a bridge? Why if you have a router? You just connect the WAN port of the router to the schools' LAN, then use wire or wireless to connect the desktop and Mac to the router, and off you go.

What am I missing?

Is this an attempt to circumvent some requirement that only your desktop can be connected to their network, not a router (something that seems to be common these days)? Because if it is, and your trying to use something like ICS to bridge (which you would have to do, you can’t just bridge the connections, you need a gateway like ICS as well), then it might just be simpler to clone your desktop MAC address to the router and have it pretend to be your desktop.


Yes, I can only connect my desktop to the lan not the router. I have my desktop connected to the router wirelessly and am trying to use ICS to connect to my mac. I will try the cloning of my mac address to the router later.. I haven't got enough time atm..

ccowan
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