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using GSM phone as a modem for notebook; How?

Last response: in Laptops & Notebooks
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October 28, 2004 4:00:45 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I put this over on one of the phone groups too, but thought some of
you may have tried this and gotten it to work. I want to use my GSM
phone (Motorola v505 w/bluetooth) as a modem to dial my pc at the
house when I am out and about. Might could use it for dial up
internet too if I could ever get it to work. I think I may be setting
up something incorrectly in the DUN side, but don't know for sure.
When the pc dials, the phone displays the number, but will not stay
connected. It will drop the connection after about 10 seconds. I
tried sending a picture to it and back and that worked just fine. The
phone tools can also have it dial a voice call, just not as a modem.
(I don't want to use GPRS)

Any ideas...?

Thanks
John
jwcross$airmail!net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 5:20:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

John wrote:
> I put this over on one of the phone groups too, but thought some of
> you may have tried this and gotten it to work. I want to use my GSM
> phone (Motorola v505 w/bluetooth) as a modem to dial my pc at the
> house when I am out and about. Might could use it for dial up
> internet too if I could ever get it to work. I think I may be setting
> up something incorrectly in the DUN side, but don't know for sure.
> When the pc dials, the phone displays the number, but will not stay
> connected. It will drop the connection after about 10 seconds. I
> tried sending a picture to it and back and that worked just fine. The
> phone tools can also have it dial a voice call, just not as a modem.
> (I don't want to use GPRS)

If you aren't going to use GPRS, then you can't use the phone as a
modem. You have to use the phone as a phone (what a concept), and use
another modem hooked up to it. It's best to just use GPRS. I use a
Motorola v60i solely as a GPRS modem. (OK, once every long long while I
make voice calls on it too, but the reason I bought it was for GPRS for
my laptop.) If you insist on not using GPRS, I suggest you get something
like a Viking cellular modem, they work pretty well. Of course, they're
also rather ancient, and I don't know if they have cables for these
newer phones. Bluetooth is probably out of the question. (I used to use
the Viking as a fallback for when my Startac CDMA phone couldn't get a
digital connection. I haven't touched it in years...)

Something I haven't seen available anywhere, but which must be a
braindead easy product to build, is a laptop modem cable that goes from
the RJ11 jack of a built-in modem to a 2.5mm headset plug, so that you
can use a laptop's built-in modem with any cellphone in voice mode.
Usually a phoneline-to-audio adapter needs a bunch of buffers and such
to drop the 48V on the phoneline to audio level, but no such voltages
are present on a notebook's modem jack, so the cable should be dead-simple.
--
-- Howard Chu
Chief Architect, Symas Corp. Director, Highland Sun
http://www.symas.com http://highlandsun.com/hyc
Symas: Premier OpenSource Development and Support
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 8:47:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> you may have tried this and gotten it to work. I want to use my GSM
> phone (Motorola v505 w/bluetooth) as a modem to dial my pc at the

Do you subscribe to data service? It is not always included in voice
plans. Remember, there is no such thing as a GSM modem. If you do a
non-GPRS data call, the phone establishes a purely digital link to the
phone network, and you borrow an analog modem AT THE TELCO.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 12:09:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Howard Chu <xyz.hyc@highlandsun.com> wrote:
>John wrote:
>> I want to use my GSM
>> phone (Motorola v505 w/bluetooth) as a modem

>If you aren't going to use GPRS, then you can't use the phone as a
>modem.

This might be phone dependent, as I use my Sony-Ericsson T68i all the
time from my Dell Latitude D600 laptop via the BlueTooth interface.
Unfortunately, I can't tell you how I got it all to work, and
wandering thru the menus doesn't tell me a lot. I suspect I used a
wizard to do the setup, which is probably device dependent, so you
should ask your laptop mfr. For instance, in my Device Manager I have
a "Bluetooth Modem", which is merely selected in DUN...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 1:00:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> If you aren't going to use GPRS, then you can't use the phone as a
> modem. You have to use the phone as a phone (what a concept), and use
> another modem hooked up to it. It's best to just use GPRS. I use a

Not accurate for GPS phones. You can't use an analog modem signal over
a GPS voice link. GPS data mode involves a pure-digital connection to
the carrier, and the carrier has an analog modem bank which is used to
establish a connection to the remote modem.

It assumes the carrier, phone and cellular service plan all support
the feature.

GPS "modems" for GPS phones (as opposed to standalone GPS "modems")
are not actually modems. They merely tell the phone to go into data
mode, physically interface the host PC to the phone's micro, and
provide Hayes emulation so the PC can control dialing, SMS, etc.
Oftentimes these days, the "modem" functionality is either built into
the phone's firmware, or emulated in software on the host PC.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 5:07:52 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Lewin A.R.W. Edwards wrote:
>>If you aren't going to use GPRS, then you can't use the phone as a
>>modem. You have to use the phone as a phone (what a concept), and use
>>another modem hooked up to it. It's best to just use GPRS. I use a

> Not accurate for GPS phones. You can't use an analog modem signal over
> a GPS voice link. GPS data mode involves a pure-digital connection to
> the carrier, and the carrier has an analog modem bank which is used to
> establish a connection to the remote modem.

> It assumes the carrier, phone and cellular service plan all support
> the feature.

I believe that's what they call CSD (Circuit-Switched Data) mode for
GSM. Best speed for CSD is 14400bps and as you say, it must be supported
by your provider.

You *can* use an analog modem over any cellphone, you just won't get
faster than 2400bps (typically) throughput. It is painfully slow, but it
works when all else fails. Still, as I said before, it's best just to
use GPRS.

> GPS "modems" for GPS phones (as opposed to standalone GPS "modems")
> are not actually modems. They merely tell the phone to go into data
> mode, physically interface the host PC to the phone's micro, and
> provide Hayes emulation so the PC can control dialing, SMS, etc.
> Oftentimes these days, the "modem" functionality is either built into
> the phone's firmware, or emulated in software on the host PC.

GPS is Global Positioning System. We were talking about GSM/GPRS...

--
-- Howard Chu
Chief Architect, Symas Corp. Director, Highland Sun
http://www.symas.com http://highlandsun.com/hyc
Symas: Premier OpenSource Development and Support
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 5:29:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

larwe@larwe.com (Lewin A.R.W. Edwards) wrote:
>Not accurate for GPS phones.

When youu say "GPS" here (6 times in one message), I assume you mean
"GSM"?
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 28, 2004 9:14:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Howard Chu <xyz.hyc@highlandsun.com> wrote:
>I believe that's what they call CSD (Circuit-Switched Data) mode for
>GSM. Best speed for CSD is 14400bps and as you say, it must be supported
>by your provider.

Dunno if it's phone or carrier limited, but my Sony Ericcson T68i has
never done better than 9600 on T-Mobile. Usable, but not very browser
friendly...

>Still, as I said before, it's best just to
>use GPRS.

GPRS costs an additional $30/month here, and I don't use data services
that much...
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 29, 2004 6:43:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> >Not accurate for GPS phones.
>
> When youu say "GPS" here (6 times in one message), I assume you mean
> "GSM"?

Yes, sorry people, it was a very long day yesterday.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
October 31, 2004 11:56:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 13:07:52 -0700, Howard Chu
<xyz.hyc@highlandsun.com> wrote:
>
>I believe that's what they call CSD (Circuit-Switched Data) mode for
>GSM. Best speed for CSD is 14400bps and as you say, it must be supported
>by your provider.

In fact, there's also High-Speed CSD (CSD), which is 28.8 to 43.3
kbps, if supported by your hand-set (eg. Nokia 6310,
http://www.nokia.com/support/tutorials/6310i/english/gt...)
and your operator (see
http://www.gsmworld.com/technology/hscsd/index.shtml).

>You *can* use an analog modem over any cellphone, you just won't get
>faster than 2400bps (typically) throughput. It is painfully slow, but it
>works when all else fails. Still, as I said before, it's best just to
>use GPRS.

It depends. In some situations (for instance when abroad), it can be
more cost-effective to dial-up a local number with CSD/HSCSD than to
do GPRS-roaming (often slow, unreliable and prohibitively expensive).

-Dominique
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 1, 2004 12:34:21 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> >You *can* use an analog modem over any cellphone, you just won't get

>
> It depends. In some situations (for instance when abroad), it can be

In the case of GPS, it doesn't "depend". Analog modems will not work
through the linear-predictive GSM codec. It is designed for speech. It
is occasionally possible to squeeze a V.21 (300bps) connection through
the codec, but it is extremely unreliable.
!