Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Bulldozer am3+ socket?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
August 25, 2010 5:52:34 PM

since hot chips there have been many new anouncments about bulldozer but the main one i was intrested in was that bulldozer will be in a new socket (AM3+ maby) and this socket will still support old AM3 cpus ...i have found several places that state amd said it would, but it dosent apear everywhere wondered if anyone knew anything on this subject?

More about : bulldozer am3 socket

a b à CPUs
August 25, 2010 6:12:13 PM

If they do go with a new socket, it should support the AM3 CPUs. When AM2+ came out, it supported AM2, so I see no reason why it wouldn't.
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2010 7:41:36 PM

I've heard about a new socket under various names for BD, but nothing has been confirmed about compatability yet.
Related resources
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2010 7:46:07 PM

Its reported here, one of the many articles that popped up yesterday about BD, that it will get a new socket. BD will not install in AM3.
http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2010/08/amd-announces-8-core-...
Quote:
. The bad news is that it won’t be compatible with existing AM3 boards. Instead, AMD says it will introduce a new AM3+ socket. These sockets will be backward compatible with older chips so you could drop a Phenom II X6 in it.


November 5, 2010 10:15:08 PM

Soooo... you can put in the 1090T CPU into the new AM3+ socket but not the Bulldozer CPU into AM3....?
a c 162 à CPUs
November 5, 2010 10:23:47 PM

Thats what it sounds like, which makes sense, if they need to add another power phase then it wont be able to drop into the older boards, but the newer one could pretend to be an older one for the older chips. Guess this means im going to need to upgrade my motherboard and CPU when i want to move up, oh well it was bound to happen.
a b à CPUs
November 5, 2010 10:25:10 PM

mspisz said:
Soooo... you can put in the 1090T CPU into the new AM3+ socket but not the Bulldozer CPU into AM3....?

Yea. They said that it would've hindered Bulldozer's features if they didn't. I say go all out to make it the best performer, backwards compatibility is nice for the enthusiasts that upgrade, but it will help them more in the long run if they have a better performing chip.
a b à CPUs
November 5, 2010 10:42:23 PM

I'd say so.

I guess they could do it in theory.
November 6, 2010 12:50:52 AM

AM3 socket supports AM3 CPUs only
AM3+ socket supports AM3 and AM3+ CPUs

a c 162 à CPUs
November 6, 2010 12:52:00 AM

Well i guess that confirms the AM3+ socket, thanks jf-amd
December 23, 2010 5:13:42 AM

yeah , as I know the new motherboard with am3+ socket will support the am3 and am2 cpu but the bus speed on the am2 cpu will be downgraded to 1000 Mhz fit in am3+ soket but if u put the am2 or am2+ cpu into socket am3+ or soon later am4 the bus speed also drops to 1000Mhz as the am2 cpu put in am3 socket they all will compatible! do not worry guys we are going to be ok!! Guys please be noticed all am2, am2+, and am3 not even am3+ or am4 socket. the all the CPU athlon X2 , athlon II X 2 X4 Phenom 2 X2 X4 X6 or 12 CPU THEY ALL HAVE THE SAME PINS so they will fit up to AM4 socket all compatible but the only difference is the bus speed will decrease if am2 cpu put in am3, am3+ and AM4 socket. and am3 CPU fits am3+ socket the bus speed is fine but if am3 CPU fits AM4 socket the bus speed will be decreased! so you guy all got that?????
December 23, 2010 11:28:19 AM

AM2 processors do not support DDR-3 so my guess is they will not work in an AM3+ board.
December 23, 2010 11:33:44 AM

well... maybe the bulldozer chips will be so cheap (like all AMD cpu's) and upgrading to a new mobo wont be so hard on your wallet/credit card/PayPal/etc/etc
a b à CPUs
December 28, 2010 6:58:16 AM

Bulldozer will run on the AM3+ socket, this socket will support AM3 old CPUs but the AM3 won't support the new Bulldozer... see Wikipedia about that, they got a little info about it.
December 28, 2010 8:16:21 AM

Pyroflea said:
If they do go with a new socket, it should support the AM3 CPUs. When AM2+ came out, it supported AM2, so I see no reason why it wouldn't.


it wont, based on two different architecture and the north bridge is no long exist which it will be a huge transition, just like 775 to 1366/1156.
December 28, 2010 8:59:59 AM

disappointing that it looks like we won't see native USB 3.0 with bulldozer according to the new leaked slides.
December 28, 2010 9:07:54 AM

metallifux said:
disappointing that it looks like we won't see native USB 3.0 with bulldozer according to the new leaked slides.


why would you be disappoint when sandy bridge also not support usb 3.0? usb 2.0's bandwidth is more than enough and if you want more bandwidth we can always have pcie port.
a c 123 à CPUs
December 28, 2010 5:13:18 PM

jf-amd said:
AM2 processors do not support DDR-3 so my guess is they will not work in an AM3+ board.


Thats pretty much it. AM2 CPUs only have a DDR2 memory controller where AM2+ and AM3 have both DDR2 and DDR3. But it doesn't explain why BD wont be able to work in a AM3 mobo.

If I were to guess, I would say it most likley the layout of the pins. AM3+ and BD probably have a bit different layout that is only in AM3+. Its almost like with some Intel chipsets that could only support the 65nm Core 2 based CPUs since the 45nm had a bit different pin layout while the more modern Intel chipsets could support both (normally from the 3 series and up although some older 9 series could support the 45nm CPUs).

But thats just a guess.
December 28, 2010 8:35:32 PM

jimmysmitty said:
Thats pretty much it. AM2 CPUs only have a DDR2 memory controller where AM2+ and AM3 have both DDR2 and DDR3. But it doesn't explain why BD wont be able to work in a AM3 mobo.

If I were to guess, I would say it most likley the layout of the pins. AM3+ and BD probably have a bit different layout that is only in AM3+. Its almost like with some Intel chipsets that could only support the 65nm Core 2 based CPUs since the 45nm had a bit different pin layout while the more modern Intel chipsets could support both (normally from the 3 series and up although some older 9 series could support the 45nm CPUs).

But thats just a guess.


simple, conroe/penryn were just a tweaked p6 architecture that glue with p4's quad data pump bus/bandwidth + some sse/instruction support that's all. their output operation weren't had any difference as they're still require a bus control north bridge and dedicate pcie controller and memory controller. since new bulldozer will integrate north bridge which older chipset will not support bd because of it. just like penryn and nehalem.

if nehalem cant place on 775 it won't be different for bulldozer on am3 anyway.
December 28, 2010 9:44:43 PM

Pinout should be the same since both procs can run in an AM3+. There is no change in level of NB integration.

I am not in the client world, but as I understand it, AM3+ delivers better performance and more features; AM3 would have to compromise on those things.
December 28, 2010 10:12:42 PM

Short answer: No.

a b à CPUs
December 29, 2010 1:38:10 AM

Still better than Intel, at least you can buy a AM3 CPU (or if you have a spare), stick it in your old AM2 and upgrade to a better motherboard.

So much nicer than Intel with their concurrently produced LGA 775, 1155, 1156, 1366.
a c 123 à CPUs
December 29, 2010 4:23:16 AM

amdfangirl said:
Still better than Intel, at least you can buy a AM3 CPU (or if you have a spare), stick it in your old AM2 and upgrade to a better motherboard.

So much nicer than Intel with their concurrently produced LGA 775, 1155, 1156, 1366.


LGA775 wasn't bad. If you got a decent mobo in 2005/2006ish you could upgrade all the way to Penryn or if you wanted (not sure why anyone would want to) put a Pentium D into a newer mobo (ewwwwwww).

LGA1156 came out at the wrong time. It only really had 32nm while LGA1366 had 2 gens of CPUs.

My bet is that LGA1155 and LGA1355 or 2011 (or whatever Intel uses) will also support 2 generations while the next step after Ivy bridge, Haswell, will probably sport a new socket and possibly boast DDR4 since Intel said thats about when DDR4 should hit.

I mean major mArch changes, new memory tyes and all kinds of things can make it near impossible to use the same socket. Thats the reason, most likley, why AMD is not supporting BD in older sockets so they can really push it to be better than Phenom II.
a b à CPUs
December 29, 2010 6:07:46 AM

jimmysmitty said:
LGA775 wasn't bad. If you got a decent mobo in 2005/2006ish you could upgrade all the way to Penryn or if you wanted (not sure why anyone would want to) put a Pentium D into a newer mobo (ewwwwwww).

LGA1156 came out at the wrong time. It only really had 32nm while LGA1366 had 2 gens of CPUs.

My bet is that LGA1155 and LGA1355 or 2011 (or whatever Intel uses) will also support 2 generations while the next step after Ivy bridge, Haswell, will probably sport a new socket and possibly boast DDR4 since Intel said thats about when DDR4 should hit.

I mean major mArch changes, new memory tyes and all kinds of things can make it near impossible to use the same socket. Thats the reason, most likley, why AMD is not supporting BD in older sockets so they can really push it to be better than Phenom II.


Thing is, all these sockets will be sold in 2011.

Intel isn't ending LGA 775 until Q2 2011.
December 29, 2010 6:11:32 AM

cheesesubs said:
why would you be disappoint when sandy bridge also not support usb 3.0? usb 2.0's bandwidth is more than enough and if you want more bandwidth we can always have pcie port.


that makes no sense, just cause intel isn't pushing USB 3.0 doesn't mean AMD shouldn't take the lead?
a b à CPUs
December 29, 2010 6:31:55 AM

I was reading some hints at the boards using Quad-Channel RAM. Apparently AMD already has a Quad-Channel controller for its Opteron 6100 series and it might let that design trickle down to the bulldozer. That would be something to see for sure.
http://www.amd.com/us/products/embedded/processors/opte...
December 29, 2010 10:52:09 AM

Avro Arrow said:
I was reading some hints at the boards using Quad-Channel RAM. Apparently AMD already has a Quad-Channel controller for its Opteron 6100 series and it might let that design trickle down to the bulldozer. That would be something to see for sure.
http://www.amd.com/us/products/embedded/processors/opte...


sorry dude i'm pretty sure just 2 channel has already been confirmed
December 29, 2010 11:48:25 AM

AMD has quad channel on the Opteron 6100 series because there are 2 dies with 2 memory controllers, so you get 4 total channels.

You will not see 6100 series infrastructure in client products, it just won't happen.
a b à CPUs
December 29, 2010 2:53:45 PM

Well it's not that big of a deal really, I'm perfectly happy with dual-channel RAM. It's just that AMD wants this to be its halo product, the sexy one that outperforms anything in Intel's arsenal. This is supposed to be AMD's new image product and I think that they should have a pie in the sky part similar to the 980X just to be able to say "We're faster than Intel". Just remember when ATi was all but dead and then the 4870 came out. The performance matched the GTX 260. When the 4870x2 came out, for the first time in YEARS ATi was able to claim to be #1. That turned their fortunes around because it gave them market credibility regardless of the fact that the 4870x2 wasn't the hottest seller of all time. People just wanted to know that the part they were buying was from a company that could be #1 at least some of the time. It makes them think it's a quality product (a perfect example of common human ignorance). Without that, ATi (and possible AMD) would be dead in the water right now. Instead, it made people like ATi more and with the release of the 5xxx series, it solidified ATi's position as not only the market leader, but the market owner. I used to see ATi as generally inferior to nVidia (which it was) before I really started looking at things in-depth. Most people don't get the chance to do that but when there's a wind of change like the one that the HD 4870 brought, the total feel becomes different. Salesmen actually speak of the product as a serious item rather than as an alternative to a serious item. People subconsciously pick up on that. For the first 2 generations of the HD series (HD 2xxx and HD 3xxx) ATi was unable to compete with the GeForce 8800 GPU, similar to AMD trying to compete with Nehalem. AMD is going to have to "Slay the beast" with Intel just as ATi had to with nVidia in order to create that wind of change that they need so badly. Having Quad-Channel RAM would have been at least something good to talk about just like tri-channel was with the LGA 1366 Nehalems. It screams "technology advancement" whether the benefit is huge or not. How many guys went out and bought i7's for genital compensation? More than we probably think and the Quad-Channel RAM would probably have had a similar effect. :sol: 
December 30, 2010 5:07:40 AM

Avro Arrow said:
Well it's not that big of a deal really, I'm perfectly happy with dual-channel RAM. It's just that AMD wants this to be its halo product, the sexy one that outperforms anything in Intel's arsenal. This is supposed to be AMD's new image product and I think that they should have a pie in the sky part similar to the 980X just to be able to say "We're faster than Intel". Just remember when ATi was all but dead and then the 4870 came out. The performance matched the GTX 260. When the 4870x2 came out, for the first time in YEARS ATi was able to claim to be #1. That turned their fortunes around because it gave them market credibility regardless of the fact that the 4870x2 wasn't the hottest seller of all time. People just wanted to know that the part they were buying was from a company that could be #1 at least some of the time. It makes them think it's a quality product (a perfect example of common human ignorance). Without that, ATi (and possible AMD) would be dead in the water right now. Instead, it made people like ATi more and with the release of the 5xxx series, it solidified ATi's position as not only the market leader, but the market owner. I used to see ATi as generally inferior to nVidia (which it was) before I really started looking at things in-depth. Most people don't get the chance to do that but when there's a wind of change like the one that the HD 4870 brought, the total feel becomes different. Salesmen actually speak of the product as a serious item rather than as an alternative to a serious item. People subconsciously pick up on that. For the first 2 generations of the HD series (HD 2xxx and HD 3xxx) ATi was unable to compete with the GeForce 8800 GPU, similar to AMD trying to compete with Nehalem. AMD is going to have to "Slay the beast" with Intel just as ATi had to with nVidia in order to create that wind of change that they need so badly. Having Quad-Channel RAM would have been at least something good to talk about just like tri-channel was with the LGA 1366 Nehalems. It screams "technology advancement" whether the benefit is huge or not. How many guys went out and bought i7's for genital compensation? More than we probably think and the Quad-Channel RAM would probably have had a similar effect. :sol: 



here here
a b à CPUs
December 30, 2010 6:22:07 AM

Sandy Bridge socket LGA2011 will have quad channel RAM, I believe.
December 30, 2010 6:30:00 AM

Avro Arrow said:
Well it's not that big of a deal really, I'm perfectly happy with dual-channel RAM. It's just that AMD wants this to be its halo product, the sexy one that outperforms anything in Intel's arsenal. This is supposed to be AMD's new image product and I think that they should have a pie in the sky part similar to the 980X just to be able to say "We're faster than Intel". Just remember when ATi was all but dead and then the 4870 came out. The performance matched the GTX 260. When the 4870x2 came out, for the first time in YEARS ATi was able to claim to be #1. That turned their fortunes around because it gave them market credibility regardless of the fact that the 4870x2 wasn't the hottest seller of all time. People just wanted to know that the part they were buying was from a company that could be #1 at least some of the time. It makes them think it's a quality product (a perfect example of common human ignorance). Without that, ATi (and possible AMD) would be dead in the water right now. Instead, it made people like ATi more and with the release of the 5xxx series, it solidified ATi's position as not only the market leader, but the market owner. I used to see ATi as generally inferior to nVidia (which it was) before I really started looking at things in-depth. Most people don't get the chance to do that but when there's a wind of change like the one that the HD 4870 brought, the total feel becomes different. Salesmen actually speak of the product as a serious item rather than as an alternative to a serious item. People subconsciously pick up on that. For the first 2 generations of the HD series (HD 2xxx and HD 3xxx) ATi was unable to compete with the GeForce 8800 GPU, similar to AMD trying to compete with Nehalem. AMD is going to have to "Slay the beast" with Intel just as ATi had to with nVidia in order to create that wind of change that they need so badly. Having Quad-Channel RAM would have been at least something good to talk about just like tri-channel was with the LGA 1366 Nehalems. It screams "technology advancement" whether the benefit is huge or not. How many guys went out and bought i7's for genital compensation? More than we probably think and the Quad-Channel RAM would probably have had a similar effect. :sol: 


...genital compensation? do you mean 'overcompensating'?
a b à CPUs
December 30, 2010 11:09:15 AM

LGA 2011 is a server socket.

Wouldn't be surprised if it did.

Nom nom nom.

LGA 1155 is for us regular folks.
December 30, 2010 1:18:00 PM

There is no such thing as a "halo product".

There are 2 types of buyers, processor aware and processor unaware. Processor unaware people don't know what is in their PC, they have a Dell, they have an HP, but they have no idea what powers it. They are probably 80% of the market. Knowing that one processor is a "halo product" won't convince them to buy one product over another because they don't know/care about the processors, it is just one more component. So a halo product doesn't work.

The processor aware (the other 20%) know and care about processors. They buy the best performance for their budget. You won't see them comparing 2 processors in their price range and selecting the slower one because of some halo product. So halo products don't work here either.

Where does the halo product work? AFTER the sale. The processor aware guy who chose the best processor for his budget that also happens to be the same brand as the halo feels better about his choice because of the halo.

So, the moral of the story is that halo brands don't work because most of the market doesn't know their processor, and those that do will not be fooled into buying the wrong thing based on some high end processor that they are not buying.
a c 123 à CPUs
December 30, 2010 5:05:48 PM

Avro Arrow said:
I was reading some hints at the boards using Quad-Channel RAM. Apparently AMD already has a Quad-Channel controller for its Opteron 6100 series and it might let that design trickle down to the bulldozer. That would be something to see for sure.
http://www.amd.com/us/products/embedded/processors/opte...


As jf-AMD said, their quad channel is specifically for the specific server area.

I think the first single CPU quad channel memory setup will be LGA2011.

Quote:
That's Ivy Bridge and I think they're all gonna be Server chips on release


No Ivy Bridge is the 22nm die shrink of Sandy Bridge. LGA2011 is the entry level and high end server for Sandy Bridge, it will have up to 8 cores and will be released either Q2 or Q3 of 2011. Ivy Bridge is still set for the end of 2011/beginning of 2012.

Quote:
And 80% of that 80% don't know that their chips are made in Asia ?


Actually its not quite like that. For CPUs its different per company. AMD had a fab in Germany. The dies were diffused there and then packaged in Malaysia. With the GlobalFoundries I am not sure if it has changed now.

Intel has multiple FABs here in the US. One in Oregon, one in Colorado and one in Chandler, AZ. The CPUs are produced here and then, as well, packaged in Malaysia.

Of course as Intels CEO states that may change in the US Government doesn't change the uber taxation.
a b à CPUs
December 30, 2010 5:57:11 PM

amdfangirl said:
LGA 2011 is a server socket.

Wouldn't be surprised if it did.

Nom nom nom.

LGA 1155 is for us regular folks.

Well, from most of what I've read, it will also be high-end desktop and workstation as well. I have seen incredibly little about this "LGA1356" (I think) that some say will replace 1366.
December 30, 2010 10:14:55 PM

AMD is developed in California, Texas, China and India. Fabrication is done in Dresden, Germany with some in Singapore. Packaging happens in Malaysia. Test and marking happens in Singapore.

That is pretty much how global companies work. I would be surprised to see it any other way.
a c 123 à CPUs
December 31, 2010 12:17:16 AM

jf-amd said:
AMD is developed in California, Texas, China and India. Fabrication is done in Dresden, Germany with some in Singapore. Packaging happens in Malaysia. Test and marking happens in Singapore.

That is pretty much how global companies work. I would be surprised to see it any other way.


Not saying its bad. I understand from a price perspective. Its cheaper that way. By development, I would imagine you men actually working out the architecture and not actual development of the parts. Then the Dresden FAB works it out into silicon and then Malaysia packages it.

Intel is somewhat the same only Core and Core 2 came from Israel while Nehalem came from Oregon. I think SB does too.

Has it changed from Dresden yet or will it remain there until GF has a chance to open more FABs for CPUs?

I would imagine Dresden will remain for a while at least, or until it becomes too expensive I would assume.
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2010 12:46:52 AM

SB will have been designed in Israel: they take turns. Also, SB's old codename was Hebrew.
December 31, 2010 2:09:41 AM

My next upgrade will be a AM3+ mobo with USB 3.0 :D 
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2010 4:11:24 AM

I want to replace my current computer with Brazios' successor.
December 31, 2010 10:08:47 AM

jimmysmitty said:
Not saying its bad. I understand from a price perspective. Its cheaper that way. By development, I would imagine you men actually working out the architecture and not actual development of the parts. Then the Dresden FAB works it out into silicon and then Malaysia packages it.

Intel is somewhat the same only Core and Core 2 came from Israel while Nehalem came from Oregon. I think SB does too.

Has it changed from Dresden yet or will it remain there until GF has a chance to open more FABs for CPUs?

I would imagine Dresden will remain for a while at least, or until it becomes too expensive I would assume.


Dresden is converted over to 32nm. They are doing 65nm, 45nm and 32nm full-scale production begins in 2011. 90nm is being done at the old Chartered fabs in Singapore.

I haven't been to Dresden in a few years but passed by on vacation this summer. Not really involved in the manufacturing side of things since I moved from the product group to marketing.
a c 123 à CPUs
January 2, 2011 8:22:20 PM

jf-amd said:
Dresden is converted over to 32nm. They are doing 65nm, 45nm and 32nm full-scale production begins in 2011. 90nm is being done at the old Chartered fabs in Singapore.

I haven't been to Dresden in a few years but passed by on vacation this summer. Not really involved in the manufacturing side of things since I moved from the product group to marketing.


Thats interesting. I am suprised they push so much out of one FAB.

Its too bad AMD didn't get to open the New York FAB. Would have helpped to ease the production a bit. But I guess GF should be good enough for that.
February 14, 2011 7:49:36 PM

PreferLinux said:
Sandy Bridge socket LGA2011 will have quad channel RAM, I believe.

hi huy amd socket am3+ have quad cjannel memori with ddr3 1866 but intel only ddr3 1600 :)  when you upgrade am3 to am3+ you can decite 2variants of mobo am3+ with dual channel memori (support am3 cpu) or am3+ with quad channel memori ( support only am3+ cpu )
February 14, 2011 7:52:55 PM

and amd have only max 2 sockets am3 and am3+ , intel have 4 with socket 2011 (1155, 1156 and 1366) - bad
when u want to upgrade sandy i5 or not sandy i5.. need to buy new mobo for new socket for i7 :) 

sorry for bad english ! :( 
a b à CPUs
February 14, 2011 8:16:36 PM

l3okorlevy said:
hi huy amd socket am3+ have quad cjannel memori with ddr3 1866 but intel only ddr3 1600 :)  when you upgrade am3 to am3+ you can decite 2variants of mobo am3+ with dual channel memori (support am3 cpu) or am3+ with quad channel memori ( support only am3+ cpu )

Wikipedia (Bulldozer):
Quote:
Dual Channel DDR3 Integrated Memory Controller (Support for PC3-15000 (DDR3-1866)) for Desktop, Quad Channel DDR3 Integrated Memory Controller (support for PC-12800 (DDR3-1600) and Registered DDR3)[9] for Server/Workstation (New Opteron Valencia and Interlagos)

Only dual-channel for AM3+ as the server/workstation versions will be a different socket. Also still only DDR3 1600 memory with quad-channel, the same as Intel.
February 14, 2011 8:28:01 PM

jf-amd said:
There is no such thing as a "halo product".

There are 2 types of buyers, processor aware and processor unaware. Processor unaware people don't know what is in their PC, they have a Dell, they have an HP, but they have no idea what powers it. They are probably 80% of the market. Knowing that one processor is a "halo product" won't convince them to buy one product over another because they don't know/care about the processors, it is just one more component. So a halo product doesn't work.

The processor aware (the other 20%) know and care about processors. They buy the best performance for their budget. You won't see them comparing 2 processors in their price range and selecting the slower one because of some halo product. So halo products don't work here either.

Where does the halo product work? AFTER the sale. The processor aware guy who chose the best processor for his budget that also happens to be the same brand as the halo feels better about his choice because of the halo.

So, the moral of the story is that halo brands don't work because most of the market doesn't know their processor, and those that do will not be fooled into buying the wrong thing based on some high end processor that they are not buying.



JF I couldnt DISAGREE more with your view.... While AMD makes nice chips they really need a HALO chip. Intels Halo product worked on me b4 the sale....Since you are a server guy maybe you dont really see what avro arrow is getting at? I would venture to guess that most people looking at these forums know a thing or too about cpus and as such can see the value of an awsome, technologicaly advanced chip, even if its out of reach for most people. Intels halo chip proves to prospective customers that they have the pedigree and brains to make a killer chip, and I like that. For me there definatly is a HALO product and Intel has it and I hope amd will too...All you have to look at is how much more Intel is making than AMD...you can talk about bang for your buck and all that but when it comes down to it. Intel is making much more than AMD...For me having that halo product solidfys Intels dominance. I really want AMD to take back the crown, settling for 2nd best is a sign of weakness. Amd needs A Killer chip, A Halo chip.

For me this is AMD's final act...I have waited along time for Bulldozer and if it cant perform then I will continue with Intel. I think there are alot of others on these forums that can agree.
a b à CPUs
February 15, 2011 12:05:46 AM

Quote:
^ I thought hiring humans instead of monkyes for ur marketing department would help ur company's business more than a halo product?

When AMD was dominating, a lot of people were still buying Intel Pentium 4s and Ds.
admittedly, I was one as well

Agreed, back during the P4 days I was only about 10 years old, and I liked tech but didn't know much about it. My parents got a P4 over an Athlon 64 just because the clockspeed was higher; that's when you need marketing to sell your product.

I never see an AMD commercial on cable, but there are plenty of Intel commercials.
February 15, 2011 1:21:05 AM

Quote:
^ I thought hiring humans instead of monkyes for ur marketing department would help ur company's business more than a halo product?

When AMD was dominating, a lot of people were still buying Intel Pentium 4s and Ds.
admittedly, I was one as well


LOL true, Im not saying that marketing isnt part of the equation. Yet, at least to me a halo product makes you feel like you own part of somthing great, even if what I own is a watered down version??... all I know is that I like knowing that my companys chip has the fastes even if I cant buy it....
February 15, 2011 2:11:01 AM

Halo products: So, if AMD had a $1500 processor that beat Intel's $1000 processor, then when you walked into the shop with your $500 to buy the processor that the rest of the world needs, would you buy the $500 AMD that was 10% slower than the $500 intel? If so, then I agree that maybe a halo product would work. But I have never seen an enthusiast pay more money for a slower product because of a halo.

As for the processor unaware, they don't buy CPUs, they buy full systems, so they don't really track the $1000 processor market, they are spending $500 for their entire computer.

As for TV ads, would enthusiasts be prone to buy that same slower $500 AMD processor over a faster intel $500 processor if we ran TV ads?

I am guessing not.

People who are "processor aware" buy the best product for their budget, period. You guys are smart people that don't get swayed by benchmarks on products you aren;t buying or ads on tv. Give yourselves some credit.
!