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Help?Which side?

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August 26, 2010 2:33:16 PM

I have the Lancool Dragonlord PC-K62 and Hec Cougar 700w psu (non-modular). Just wanted to know which way of mounting would be more, i don't know, "effective." I currently have it having the fan facing downwards where it was i guess made to be put since there is a dust filter present. I just wanted to know if it would effectively be cooler or more efficient if i had the fan facing inside the case rather than the bottom. Thanks in advance.

~drex

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a c 243 ) Power supply
August 26, 2010 2:48:30 PM

drexeus said:
I just wanted to know if it would effectively be cooler or more efficient if i had the fan facing inside the case rather than the bottom.
Think about it, if it's drawing in warm case air would it be cooler than when drawing in fresh air from outside the case ?
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August 26, 2010 3:01:50 PM

hahaha, yeah that would be the case but seeing as its facing the floor with minimal space beneath would it actually be drawing in more air unlike if it was facing the inside? The air would be more or less be a bit warmer than outside but technically hot air rises right? So with the front fan blowing in wouldn't it be cooler? Just random questions to get the most of the system. Thanks mate! =P
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a c 91 ) Power supply
August 26, 2010 6:56:42 PM

For a bottom mounted fan, the ideal setting is when it draws cooler air from outside and pushes it inside the case.. If its set in a reverse order, chances are that It'll draw out the cooler air brought in by the front intake fans thereby creating an imbalanced airflow setup.. If there is not much ground clearance to breath in, my suggestion would be to get rid of the bottom mounted fan..
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a c 248 ) Power supply
August 26, 2010 8:26:02 PM

I just happen to have the Lancool Dragonlord PC-K60 for my own personal pc.

As others have suggested you can mount the psu in the bottom of the case so that the psu pulls in fresh air from the opening in the bottom of the case and exhausts hot air out the rear panel. It will work providing several conditions are met.

1. The case must rest on a flat surface such as a desk, stand, or wooden floor. There has to be sufficient clearance for air intake. Placing the case on a carpeted floor will block air flow.

2. There must be sufficient ventilation, airflow, and cooling for other components. For example, if the video card is located immediately above the psu and running hot, then the psu fan could be used to help exhaust the hot air from the video card.

Here is an example of a few minor changes I made to my Dragonlord case to improve ventilation, airflow, and cooling:

http://www.johnnylucky.org/dragon-lord/index.html

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August 26, 2010 8:27:56 PM

Good rule of thumb: Front Bottom Back Top. The front fans are intake at the bottom of the case pulling in cool air. The back fans are exhaust at the top of the case pushing out hot air. Things get a little tricky with a bottom mounted PSU exhausting air out the bottom of the case.

In your situation your likely have a big honking GPU in there so your air flow is somewhat segmented. The GPU acts as a shelf separating the air around the CPU from the bottom of the case. In this way your PSU (fan facing up twards the GPU) will help exhaust air from the the GPU out the back/bottom of the case. The top rear fan will exhaust air from your CPU out the back of the case.

Ideally you have to front fans mounted one on top of the other. The lowest would feed cool air to the GPU/PSU area and the top would send air over the top of the GPU into the top of the case.
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a c 144 ) Power supply
August 26, 2010 11:16:05 PM

runningbot said:
Things get a little tricky with a bottom mounted PSU exhausting air out the bottom of the case.

You are talking about a bottom mounted PSU sucking air in from the bottom and exhausting it out the back.

I have Antec 900 cases with the bottom mounted PSU, fan facing up. It doesn't seem to have affected my temps. Exhaust air from the PSU is about 3 C over ambient as measured with an electronic cooking thermometer.

I tried mounting the PSU, fan down, on one of my systems. I figured that if it significantly affected CPU and GPU temps, I'd mod the case by cutting a hole in the base. I saw no significant change in temps. I try to operate my PSU's at 50% - 60% of capacity. So that may have changed things.
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August 27, 2010 1:27:14 AM

jsc said:
You are talking about a bottom mounted PSU sucking air in from the bottom and exhausting it out the back.

I have Antec 900 cases with the bottom mounted PSU, fan facing up. It doesn't seem to have affected my temps. Exhaust air from the PSU is about 3 C over ambient as measured with an electronic cooking thermometer.

I tried mounting the PSU, fan down, on one of my systems. I figured that if it significantly affected CPU and GPU temps, I'd mod the case by cutting a hole in the base. I saw no significant change in temps. I try to operate my PSU's at 50% - 60% of capacity. So that may have changed things.


I think he should mount the PSU as intended. Fan top, exhausting into the PSU unit and out the back. If I'm correct in my understanding you measured the temp of the air coming out the back. This doesn't really tell you anything. The PSU is pulling in hot air off the GPU above it. It's then running that hot air into the PSU, which also has hot air, and then exhausting all the air out the back. You can't measure the effect the PSU exhaust is having on the GPU by checking the temperate of the air coming out of it. Rather you should record the temp of the GPU without the PSU in the bottom and then with the PSU in the bottom to accurately determine how much it reduces, or increases due to proximity of another heat source, GPU temps.
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