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1155 v 1366

Anyone out there see any review(s) by which they pit the new P67 chipset vs the X58 chipset with performance-level CPUs using the same video card(s) showing gaming performance?

This almost seems like a taboo topic for review sites. Who wouldn't want to know???

I wonder if they lose support from the hardware vendors if they do things like this (God forbid they can't objectively prove the new technology performs better than the old)?
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More about 1155 1366
  1. That bench tells me that one CPU performs some system operations more efficiently than the other and it tells me if I'm using a given CPU at 1680x1050, the 2600K offers better performance with older games.

    Are they using the same GPUs for each test?

    When I compare the 2600k to the Pentium 4 660 th 2600k wins at everything, but you know that can't be comparing apples to apples with the video cards for benchmarking game performance. That performance tool at anandtech is novel, but doesn't give real comparisons.

    Any new reviews out their comparing lets say a 2600k to a 960 with no OC and the same video cards with newer games? Taking a look at what you get out of the box?
  2. Best answer
    Not much, almost everybody tested those only at 1680x1050 in order to trash the Phenom IIs (who are weaker at lower resolutions).

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-core-i7-2600k-core-i5-2500k,2833-18.html

    http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2124156&highlight=sandy+bridge+review

    You can OC the K CPUs easyer.
    Or you can wait until June for the new Bulldozer and then for new Intel high-end socket (that will replace the 1366).
  3. I know for a fact that I've seen reviews where they compare various CPUs at equivalent speeds (if I recall correctly, it was 4.0GHz). For whatever reason, I can't find them now using Google. It's possible that they were video reviews on YouTube -- I didn't check those links.
  4. 1155 owns most of the gaming world.....1366 remains king for big spreadsheets / databases, 3D Rendering, Movie Editing and some other specialized applications. Also, if you want the bandwidth for 3 or 4 GPU's, you're gonna lean 1366.
  5. JackNaylorPE said:
    1155 owns most of the gaming world.....1366 remains king for big spreadsheets / databases, 3D Rendering, Movie Editing and some other specialized applications. Also, if you want the bandwidth for 3 or 4 GPU's, you're gonna lean 1366.

    So the 1366 is best for more than two video cards? Is there any particular reason that you know of?
  6. Yes -- the triple-channel memory bandwidth.

    If you're using two cards at single-monitor resolutions like 2560x1200, 1155 competes well.

    If you're using more than two cards and/or using multi-monitor resolutions like 5760x1200, 1366 wins by a small margin (~7%) in some games. The rest are still virtually tied.
  7. This article has what I'm looking for:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/p67-gaming-3-way-sli-three-card-crossfire,2910-16.html

    The timing couldn't have been better. Sandy bridge processors and the P67 chipset are great, but an overall increase of 2% using Sandy Bridge and one of the most expensive motherboards available for that chipset compared to a 1366 at higher resolutions is not enough for me to consider it an upgrade.

    I'll build another 1366 (since I have many of these parts laying around as a result of upgrades) as a DAW and wait for the end of the year's architecture updates which are supposed to really step up the performance.

    Additionally, I like Intel, but I'm really hoping the Dozer release will make some waves. After all, competition is good for us consumers.
  8. Best answer selected by ubercake.
  9. This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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