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First purchase need help

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July 1, 2010 5:57:46 AM

Hey Everyone, i just joined the forums today, and i was wondering if anyone can help me put together a computer that is made specifically for gaming. This is my first computer i have ever made and it has to be prebuilt. Here are some details that could help you guys understand where im coming from. Thanks in advance for anyone that gives some advice or suggestions.

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: n/a

BUDGET RANGE: around 1000 if anything 1200

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: high-end gaming

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Mouse, Keyboard, Monitor

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS:Newegg & any other reliable hardware distributor

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: USA

OVERCLOCKING: i would like to keep the option open, crossfire etc.

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 18 inch LCD (getting a better one soon)

More about : purchase

July 1, 2010 11:05:12 AM

Your biggest problem is that few prebuilts allow overclocking, especially at your price point.

If you absolutely need prebuilt, check the Dell site. They will practically build to order.

But why not build your own? Go to the home page of this site and look for the "Build your own" articles. For an entry level computer, you cannot do better than prebuilt, because you just cannot compete with economies of scale. But at your budget, things are different. You can do better than prebuilt.
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July 2, 2010 3:25:16 AM

jsc said:
Your biggest problem is that few prebuilts allow overclocking, especially at your price point.

If you absolutely need prebuilt, check the Dell site. They will practically build to order.

But why not build your own? Go to the home page of this site and look for the "Build your own" articles. For an entry level computer, you cannot do better than prebuilt, because you just cannot compete with economies of scale. But at your budget, things are different. You can do better than prebuilt.


Well, he's posting in this forum because he's unable to build his own computer, if he could, he'd have been posting in a different section. Anyway, Dell's a decent distributor, but even so, with that budget, prebuilt computers are typically more expensive now a days, and yes, you'll get a lot more bang for your buck building, but seeing as how your experience with computers is entry-level, I'd look into buying a machine that can be easily upgraded. Some computers just aren't easy to work with, so Dell may be a decent option since they have such a large variety.
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July 2, 2010 9:55:01 AM

khubani said:
Well, he's posting in this forum because he's unable to build his own computer, if he could, he'd have been posting in a different section. Anyway, Dell's a decent distributor, but even so, with that budget, prebuilt computers are typically more expensive now a days, and yes, you'll get a lot more bang for your buck building, but seeing as how your experience with computers is entry-level, I'd look into buying a machine that can be easily upgraded. Some computers just aren't easy to work with, so Dell may be a decent option since they have such a large variety.



Hey, Khubani i your correct on most of what you say, but there is one reason i posted mainly. i wanted someone to put together a prebuilt one and respond back to me so i have the gist of what to be looking at pertaining to gaming. From there i could make changes from more research i do. If anyone can put one together that's really nice fitting my budget that would be well appreciated. Any good reliable provider would be appreciated. thanks for anyone that helps in my quest for a good computer.
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July 2, 2010 11:00:54 AM

You will be wanting no less than an i5 750, 4gb of decent RAM (ideally 1600mhz, CL7) at least a Radeon 5850 Graphics card, you need a high end motherboard to have Crossfire and ideally USB3.0 SATA 6gb/s. All this is attainable with $1000-$1200 if building your own, the question will be how close you can get to that with a bought one.

i5 750 - $199.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Asus P7P55D-E PRO - $189.99 (6gb/s, 3.0 USB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G Skill 4GB 2x2GB RAM - $109.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX Radeon HD 5850 1GB GDDR5 - $289.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 500gb 7200RPM 16MB Cache - $54.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX 650W - $99.99 ($79.99 after rebate)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HAF 922 - $89.99 + $9.99 shipping
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Any optical drive, cost about $20.

The problem is, with a prebuilt you likely wont get to choose the brand of RAM, the Powersupply or the hard drive - and possibly not even the mobo, that and the overcharging. But at a glance, this are the kind of things you will be looking for.

Due to the cost of prebuilt, sacrifices will no doubt have to be made, but if going Intel do not settle for less than i5 750. If AMD then a 955 Phenom X4.
Do not get a weaker card than the 5850 Radeon either. Having a cheaper motherboard would not be the end of the world, you may lose Crossfire as an option but that just means you need a decent single graphics card (I always just keep a powerful single card and never Crossfire)
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July 3, 2010 7:27:13 AM

asteldian said:
You will be wanting no less than an i5 750, 4gb of decent RAM (ideally 1600mhz, CL7) at least a Radeon 5850 Graphics card, you need a high end motherboard to have Crossfire and ideally USB3.0 SATA 6gb/s. All this is attainable with $1000-$1200 if building your own, the question will be how close you can get to that with a bought one.

i5 750 - $199.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Asus P7P55D-E PRO - $189.99 (6gb/s, 3.0 USB)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

G Skill 4GB 2x2GB RAM - $109.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX Radeon HD 5850 1GB GDDR5 - $289.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 500gb 7200RPM 16MB Cache - $54.99
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

XFX 650W - $99.99 ($79.99 after rebate)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HAF 922 - $89.99 + $9.99 shipping
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Any optical drive, cost about $20.

The problem is, with a prebuilt you likely wont get to choose the brand of RAM, the Powersupply or the hard drive - and possibly not even the mobo, that and the overcharging. But at a glance, this are the kind of things you will be looking for.

Due to the cost of prebuilt, sacrifices will no doubt have to be made, but if going Intel do not settle for less than i5 750. If AMD then a 955 Phenom X4.
Do not get a weaker card than the 5850 Radeon either. Having a cheaper motherboard would not be the end of the world, you may lose Crossfire as an option but that just means you need a decent single graphics card (I always just keep a powerful single card and never Crossfire)


doesn't he want a computer that's going already built when it's purchased? these individual parts may indicate that you're suggesting that he builds his own computer, unless i read your post wrong, then i apologize in advance. gkriplani, try customizing setups on dell's website, and i do agree with what's been said in regards to the video cards - one strong video card can just about out do 2 weaker cards - it's really quality over quantity...so long as you know what cards are the better ones, you'll be able to determine what card is appropriate. a video card plays a huge role in the computer building process - it determines how much RAM you may need to add/remove, it even may play a role in what type of processor you want. try to think of a computer as a car, one component works off the other, and they all depend on each other to function properly - if one part isn't functioning correctly, it may bottleneck (in other words, decrease) performance...but, it is up to you.
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July 4, 2010 7:16:35 PM

gkriplani, your best bet is to build your own computer based on asteldian's recommendations. Get help from a friend and also from this site. There are plenty of excellent guides on how to build a new computer.

Dells are cheap crappy computers, adequate for word processing, emails, and surfing the internet. Don't expect good tech support from them.

The majority of computer builders are very knowledgeable and helpful people, and are willing to help. Spend some time at computer hardware/parts stores such as MicroCenter, CompUSA (TigerDirect), Fry's, and listen to some of the folks there.
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July 4, 2010 10:34:29 PM

Ubrales said:
gkriplani, your best bet is to build your own computer based on asteldian's recommendations. Get help from a friend and also from this site. There are plenty of excellent guides on how to build a new computer.

Dells are cheap crappy computers, adequate for word processing, emails, and surfing the internet. Don't expect good tech support from them.

The majority of computer builders are very knowledgeable and helpful people, and are willing to help. Spend some time at computer hardware/parts stores such as MicroCenter, CompUSA (TigerDirect), Fry's, and listen to some of the folks there.


Why are you trying to convince him to build his computer? At the current time, he's posted in this forum, in this section, because he's seeking advice on what prebuilt computer would best suit his needs. He's not looking for persuasion into building a PC, he's looking to make an investment into one through a company. Let's just give him some ideas as to how to go about looking for one he can purchase through a retailer.
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July 4, 2010 10:50:49 PM

khubani said:
Why are you trying to convince him to build his computer? At the current time, he's posted in this forum, in this section, because he's seeking advice on what prebuilt computer would best suit his needs. He's not looking for persuasion into building a PC, he's looking to make an investment into one through a company. Let's just give him some ideas as to how to go about looking for one he can purchase through a retailer.


When I don't believe in any of the pre-built computers, it is prudent to point out some of the latent defects in pre-built computers. People make decisions based on facts and data - let's provide facts and data - not opinions!
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