Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Asus vs Gigabyte, P67 boards what is big differences between the two?

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
March 31, 2011 9:59:33 AM

Hello

I am going to buy a Asus or Asrock board for SB build, but wanted to know if Gigabyte is any good and if I should look at there stuff?
a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
March 31, 2011 1:43:14 PM

Yes, Gigabyte's products are of quite high quality, generally comparable to ASUS' products.
m
0
l
March 31, 2011 1:47:57 PM

outlw6669 said:
Yes, Gigabyte's products are of quite high quality, generally comparable to ASUS' products.


So which brand would be good to get for P67? I will oc the cpu and gpu also.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
March 31, 2011 1:55:17 PM

My preference is towards ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards.
As to which specific board, you really need to compare the price and features offered between the available models.
m
0
l
March 31, 2011 2:00:14 PM

outlw6669 said:
My preference is towards ASUS and Gigabyte motherboards.
As to which specific board, you really need to compare the price and features offered between the available models.


How about Asrock?
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
March 31, 2011 2:04:06 PM

I have had no first hand experience with ASRock motherboards.
Seeing as they are a low cost spin off from ASUS, I would consider their products to be a solid value alternative.
They may not have all the bells and whistles of a more expensive board but I hear they are quite stable and cost effective.
m
0
l
March 31, 2011 2:09:06 PM

outlw6669 said:
I have had no first hand experience with ASRock motherboards.
Seeing as they are a low cost spin off from ASUS, I would consider their products to be a solid value alternative.
They may not have all the bells and whistles of a more expensive board but I hear they are quite stable and cost effective.


What do people mean by bells and whistles of more expensive boards? They all seem to have either little pci-e 16 slots or many.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
March 31, 2011 2:21:12 PM

Dual Gigabit LAN, PCIe slots that can switch to 8x/8x for multi-GPU's (as compared to 16x/4x), a better sound CODEC, better power stages (helps with overclocking and overclocked stability), more robust cooling of onboard components, better layouts, eSATA port(s), USB3 and SATA III controllers, etc.

Basically, the bells and whistles are items that are not strictly required for system operation but can be quite nice to have.
It is really up to your specific needs if you should get a less expensive board or one with more features.

For example, if you are going to run a CrossFire or SLI setup you would want a motherboard that supports 8x/8x PCIe switching while if you wanted to use a next generation SSD having a SATA III controller on board would probably be beneficial.

As there are quite a few different P67 boards out there, your best option would be to first define how much you wish to spend on one.
From there you can directly compare all models at that price point or below to see which fits you best.
Share
March 31, 2011 4:06:19 PM

outlw6669 said:
Dual Gigabit LAN, PCIe slots that can switch to 8x/8x for multi-GPU's (as compared to 16x/4x), a better sound CODEC, better power stages (helps with overclocking and overclocked stability), more robust cooling of onboard components, better layouts, eSATA port(s), USB3 and SATA III controllers, etc.

Basically, the bells and whistles are items that are not strictly required for system operation but can be quite nice to have.
It is really up to your specific needs if you should get a less expensive board or one with more features.

For example, if you are going to run a CrossFire or SLI setup you would want a motherboard that supports 8x/8x PCIe switching while if you wanted to use a next generation SSD having a SATA III controller on board would probably be beneficial.

As there are quite a few different P67 boards out there, your best option would be to first define how much you wish to spend on one.
From there you can directly compare all models at that price point or below to see which fits you best.


Oh ok.

How do I know if the sound codec is a good one or not? How do I check the power stages and how do I know if it is good or not?
m
0
l
April 1, 2011 3:50:48 AM

Best answer selected by g335.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
April 4, 2011 12:43:34 PM

Generally speaking, having more power stages available will allow you to give more/more stable power to your CPU, especially when heavily overclocked.
If it is not listed in the specs you can determine how many stages are available by counting the ferrite chokes around the CPU socket.


As for the sound CODEC's, there are not so many reviews out there on the different designs so it can be a bit hard to compare them directly.
There are however some motherboards that offer visibally better options in the form of a riser sound card.
These generally contain a higher quality CODEC along with some discrete hardware that helps to control noise.
To be honest though, if having the best quality sound is important, you would probably be better off getting a discrete ASUS Xonar Dx or D1..
m
0
l
!