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Please help diagnose PC problem!

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Last response: in CPUs
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August 29, 2010 8:18:22 PM

Hi guys,

I have been having problems with my PC. It will not boot/post or output any display signal. My specs:

i7 920
Asus Rampage 2 Extreme
3Gb corsair ram
Samsung spinpoint 1Tb
GTX 275
Enermax galaxy 1KW
Windows 7 64bit

All drivers/bios up to date.

Things I know it isn't: PSU (tried in friends lga775 pc), GPU (tried in friends lga775 pc).

I can't test the CPU/MB/RAM in another machine, as I dont have access to any other socket 1366 components. I have tried CMOS clearing, removing the cmos battery and waiting/replacing, booting with only 1 ram stick installed, tried all 3 ram sticks separately, tried the different ram slots, different PSU, with/without HD/optical drive - literally everything.

The helpful bios poster that comes with the MB simply counts up from 00:00:00 every time I turn it on. No error message, nothing. All the fans spin fast, then slow down as normal, and then nothing.

Probably a lost cause, but any help would be greatly appreciated, i'm literally at the end of my tether here!

More about : diagnose problem

August 29, 2010 8:22:24 PM

I was just about to post this exact same thing about 12 hours ago but my internet went down. EXACTLY the same problem. GPU works, PSU works. I heard that it could be that your heat sync is loose, Didn't work for me but it might for you.
August 30, 2010 2:17:17 AM

How long has it been showing this behavior? Did you build the system yourself? Are there any configurations in which you get a successful POST? Do you have Integrated video to try just for experimentation`s sake?

emyyhh said:
Hi guys,

I have been having problems with my PC. It will not boot/post or output any display signal. My specs:

i7 920
Asus Rampage 2 Extreme
3Gb corsair ram
Samsung spinpoint 1Tb
GTX 275
Enermax galaxy 1KW
Windows 7 64bit

All drivers/bios up to date.

Things I know it isn't: PSU (tried in friends lga775 pc), GPU (tried in friends lga775 pc).

I can't test the CPU/MB/RAM in another machine, as I dont have access to any other socket 1366 components. I have tried CMOS clearing, removing the cmos battery and waiting/replacing, booting with only 1 ram stick installed, tried all 3 ram sticks separately, tried the different ram slots, different PSU, with/without HD/optical drive - literally everything.

The helpful bios poster that comes with the MB simply counts up from 00:00:00 every time I turn it on. No error message, nothing. All the fans spin fast, then slow down as normal, and then nothing.

Probably a lost cause, but any help would be greatly appreciated, i'm literally at the end of my tether here!

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a c 86 à CPUs
August 30, 2010 2:42:54 AM

If you know the PSU is ok, the vid card is ok, unlikely all the ram is dead, CPU's rarely fail, have re-seated all components, and you have tested it in a bare minimum configuration (cpu and ram in mainboard only outside of the case) I would put my bet on the motherboard.
a c 172 à CPUs
August 30, 2010 3:45:45 AM

Work through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
I mean work through, not just read over it.

Breadboard - that will isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. You do have a case speaker installed, right? If not, you really, really need one. If your case or motherboard didn't come with a system speaker, you can buy one here:
http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to.

You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems.
Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or
CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if
it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should
change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card. Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.
a b à CPUs
August 30, 2010 3:58:33 AM

I am with the Crowe. The most likely candidate is the Motherboard.
August 30, 2010 5:55:23 PM

Firstly, thanks for the great replies. Jsc, I have been through the threads you listed, many thanks. I had already resorted to breadboarding my system, although I don't have a MB speaker.

@tu_illegalamigo, I built the system myself, and it has been working fine for the last 1.5 years. I don't have integrated video and no configurations work thus far.

I've pretty much accepted that my £300+ (originally) motherboard has died on me. A similar thing also happened to an old X38 ROG board as well. Since Intel is releasing a new socket in the not too distant future my thoughts are to sell working parts (cpu, cooler, ram) and go AMD. I simply don't have the cash to invest in a high-end system, and by going AMD I could get a socket AM3 board, probably a hex-core cpu, and 4gb of ram. Which with some overclocking will probably out-perform my i7 chip.

Also, this Sandybridge socket change malarky doesn't leave me feeling all warm inside for Intel. I have never been with AMD, but if they stick to socket AM3 for their bulldozer architecture, then they can have my cash.

August 30, 2010 10:28:08 PM

I think they`re going to make a modified socket to support the new bulldozer stuff, so either way you`re probably looking at a socket change in 2011, but probably not RAM or other stuff like that. That`s too bad such a high end board died on you, no warranty? Electricity is a very "uncertain" mistress.
!