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travel warning: TSA took my allen wrenches

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Anonymous
December 18, 2004 11:10:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
I've carried these for a couple of years without a
problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
"New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
allen wrenches were banned.

So don't take any tools on board any more.

Roger
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 12:30:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <username@qwest.net> wrote in
message news:41C44860.8000203@qwest.net...
> About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> allen wrenches were banned.
>
> So don't take any tools on board any more.

That is right, the prohibited items list (conveniently available in .pdf
format on the TSA web site) includes tools, but specifically says nail
clippers and safety razors are allowed.

Furthermore, if you attempt to bring Allen wrenches to a checkpoint again,
you can be fined $250 - $1500, because now you are supposed to know better;
you have been flagged. Do it again and they will assume it is intentional.

Perhaps Homeland Security believes that the best way to protect US citizens
is to lock them up on any pretext possible in order to keep them out of
harm's way.

I am firmly convinced that TSA is the best possible argument for learning to
fly. You can carry anything you want on your own airplane.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 3:50:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
want...

Dave


On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 09:30:23 -0800, "C J Campbell"
<christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>That is right, the prohibited items list (conveniently available in .pdf
>format on the TSA web site) includes tools, but specifically says nail
>clippers and safety razors are allowed.
>
>Furthermore, if you attempt to bring Allen wrenches to a checkpoint again,
>you can be fined $250 - $1500, because now you are supposed to know better;
>you have been flagged. Do it again and they will assume it is intentional.
>
>Perhaps Homeland Security believes that the best way to protect US citizens
>is to lock them up on any pretext possible in order to keep them out of
>harm's way.
>
>I am firmly convinced that TSA is the best possible argument for learning to
>fly. You can carry anything you want on your own airplane.
>
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 3:50:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
> want...
>

Bah! Clogging up the roads with yet another automobile, endangering
everybody around you while you in turn are at the mercy of every drunk
driver and vehicle operator who just had a fight with his wife, dodging 18
wheelers on icy roads -- next thing you know you've run into a school bus
full of children, one of whom would have grown up to discover a cure for
cancer, but now he's dead and IT IS ALL YOUR FAULT! Beast. :-)

(I dunno, was that over the top, or what?)

Seriously, I find flying to be very convenient, fast and comfortable. If I
want to visit the grandchildren I can be there in 3 1/2 hours, instead of 11
hours of driving over two major mountain passes in winter. And I get some
great photos out of the trip, too. <Sigh> Even so I still have trouble
finding time to get away.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 4:35:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 10:54:40 -0800, "C J Campbell"
<christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>"Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> want...
>>
>
>Bah! Clogging up the roads with yet another automobile, endangering
>everybody around you while you in turn are at the mercy of every drunk
>driver and vehicle operator who just had a fight with his wife, dodging 18
>wheelers on icy roads -- next thing you know you've run into a school bus
>full of children, one of whom would have grown up to discover a cure for
>cancer, but now he's dead and IT IS ALL YOUR FAULT! Beast. :-)
>
>(I dunno, was that over the top, or what?)

Mebbe, but this is America. A clever lawyer will see your logic
coming a mile away and will point out that the TSA drove him get on
the highway. So it really is the TSAs fault.

>
>Seriously, I find flying to be very convenient, fast and comfortable. If I
>want to visit the grandchildren I can be there in 3 1/2 hours, instead of 11
>hours of driving over two major mountain passes in winter. And I get some
>great photos out of the trip, too. <Sigh> Even so I still have trouble
>finding time to get away.
>

Yeah, flying is fast and convenient. And for some, their livihood
depends on it. But those silly & inconsistent rules, the humiliating
body searches, theft from luggage by the people "protecting" us and
the Gestapo like attitude from the TSA encourage people to drive and
seek other ways to get from here to there. And even more damaging,
undermining confidence in our government. This is one way for the
terrorists to win. They won't have to take us over. We will turn
ourselves into them.

The Afgan Taliban is/was Muslim, the American Taliban will be
Christian.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 4:46:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <username@qwest.net> wrote in
message news:41C44860.8000203@qwest.net...
> About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> allen wrenches were banned.
>
> So don't take any tools on board any more.
>
> Roger
>

TSA's Web site has a list of items you can't carry on. Some people doing
the checking seem to make up their own rules. Feel free to complain.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 4:46:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Marvin Margoshes" <physnospamchem@cloud9.net> wrote in message
news:10s8uo052sgk4d7@corp.supernews.com...
> >
>
> TSA's Web site has a list of items you can't carry on. Some people doing
> the checking seem to make up their own rules. Feel free to complain.
>
>

The list contains disclaimers which allow local examiners to make up their
own rules. If, in the sole opinion of the checker, you are carrying
something that could be used as a weapon, then they can confiscate it, fine
you, or even have you arrested. If you complain, that is a bad attitude,
which automatically doubles your fine and tacks time on your sentence. Read
the guidelines for civil actions. It actually says that.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 5:05:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 12:50:00 -0500, Dave Fouchey <dfouchey@sc.rr.com>
wrote:

>I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>want...
>
>Dave

Plus, you can always stop to see whatever you want.
On a plane, you could theoretically get out to see the world's largest
mud house, but getting back in again is a bitch.
>
>
>On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 09:30:23 -0800, "C J Campbell"
><christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>That is right, the prohibited items list (conveniently available in .pdf
>>format on the TSA web site) includes tools, but specifically says nail
>>clippers and safety razors are allowed.
>>
>>Furthermore, if you attempt to bring Allen wrenches to a checkpoint again,
>>you can be fined $250 - $1500, because now you are supposed to know better;
>>you have been flagged. Do it again and they will assume it is intentional.
>>
>>Perhaps Homeland Security believes that the best way to protect US citizens
>>is to lock them up on any pretext possible in order to keep them out of
>>harm's way.
>>
>>I am firmly convinced that TSA is the best possible argument for learning to
>>fly. You can carry anything you want on your own airplane.
>>

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 5:05:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"C J Campbell" <christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:sYidnWbeQpxv4VncRVn-3Q@wavecable.com...
>
> "Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> want...
>>
>
> Bah! Clogging up the roads with yet another automobile, endangering
> everybody around you while you in turn are at the mercy of every drunk
> driver and vehicle operator who just had a fight with his wife, dodging 18
> wheelers on icy roads -- next thing you know you've run into a school bus
> full of children, one of whom would have grown up to discover a cure for
> cancer, but now he's dead and IT IS ALL YOUR FAULT! Beast. :-)
>
> (I dunno, was that over the top, or what?)
>
> Seriously, I find flying to be very convenient, fast and comfortable. If I
> want to visit the grandchildren I can be there in 3 1/2 hours, instead of
> 11
> hours of driving over two major mountain passes in winter. And I get some
> great photos out of the trip, too. <Sigh> Even so I still have trouble
> finding time to get away.
>
>

Your attitude is exactly right, except you need to tighten up the foil just
a bit. You are getting a bit of leakage.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 6:42:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Denver TSA has always been pretty lame I have a small razor knife that is
the size of a key it has gone thru the screenings dozens of time in my
carryon and in the little tray for keys. However when I tried to use an
expired passport for an ID they said no.
http://custom-studios.com/keytags.htm. I checked the TSA site and could not
find anything as far as ID is concerned

Wayne

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <username@qwest.net> wrote in
message news:41C44860.8000203@qwest.net...
> About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> allen wrenches were banned.
>
> So don't take any tools on board any more.
>
> Roger
>
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:10:24 -0700, Roger N. Clark wrote:
> About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> allen wrenches were banned.
>
> So don't take any tools on board any more.
>
> Roger

I've been through The Illusion Of Security at DIA many times, as well.
Many confiscations are capricious and arbitrary. If you try to
stand your ground, you'll be subjected to a 10-15 search of
yourself and your carry-on luggage. Furthermore, every airport
seems to make up their own "local" rules.

I've had my nail clippers taken, when, as you point out, they
are permitted. And, as for tools, except for the thugs working
for the TSA, all of us have opposable thumbs, and EVERYTHING
is a potential tool.

The Dept Of Homeland Hysteria has been a god-send for the airport
thieves. Now they have multi-million dollar machines with which
to pin-point luggage that contains gold jewelry, expensive cameras,
und so weiter. No more randomly breaking into bags, in the hope
of hitting the jackpot. These thieves are only required to go
through security and metal detectors _on the way in to work_ , not
on the way out -- with their pockets jingling with stolen articles.

So sayeth the voice of several wretched experiences...
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"drwxr-xr-x" <bit-bucket@config.com> wrote in message
news:slrncs8sv8.h1n.bit-bucket@shell.config.com...
>
> The Dept Of Homeland Hysteria has been a god-send for the airport
> thieves. Now they have multi-million dollar machines with which
> to pin-point luggage that contains gold jewelry, expensive cameras,
> und so weiter. No more randomly breaking into bags, in the hope
> of hitting the jackpot. These thieves are only required to go
> through security and metal detectors _on the way in to work_ , not
> on the way out -- with their pockets jingling with stolen articles.
>
> So sayeth the voice of several wretched experiences...

You would be shocked at how many people at TSA have criminal records.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

C J Campbell wrote:
>
> "drwxr-xr-x" <bit-bucket@config.com> wrote in message
> news:slrncs8sv8.h1n.bit-bucket@shell.config.com...
> >
> > The Dept Of Homeland Hysteria has been a god-send for the airport
> > thieves. Now they have multi-million dollar machines with which
> > to pin-point luggage that contains gold jewelry, expensive cameras,
> > und so weiter. No more randomly breaking into bags, in the hope
> > of hitting the jackpot. These thieves are only required to go
> > through security and metal detectors _on the way in to work_ , not
> > on the way out -- with their pockets jingling with stolen articles.
> >
> > So sayeth the voice of several wretched experiences...
>
> You would be shocked at how many people at TSA have criminal records.

Not to mention the airport ground crews, few of which have had complete
background checks, and many of whom have easy access to the passenger
compartments of airplanes. We're not supposed to think about this, just
like the movies suspension of disbelief is essential to enjoying (or
not) the show.

Lisa
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 10:56:33 -0800, "C J Campbell"
<christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>"drwxr-xr-x" <bit-bucket@config.com> wrote in message
>news:slrncs8sv8.h1n.bit-bucket@shell.config.com...
>>
>> The Dept Of Homeland Hysteria has been a god-send for the airport
>> thieves. Now they have multi-million dollar machines with which
>> to pin-point luggage that contains gold jewelry, expensive cameras,
>> und so weiter. No more randomly breaking into bags, in the hope
>> of hitting the jackpot. These thieves are only required to go
>> through security and metal detectors _on the way in to work_ , not
>> on the way out -- with their pockets jingling with stolen articles.
>>
>> So sayeth the voice of several wretched experiences...
>
>You would be shocked at how many people at TSA have criminal records.

Not really. But I would be amused to read any reports or anecdotes
about it.
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Lisa Horton wrote:

>> You would be shocked at how many people at TSA have criminal records.
>
> Not to mention the airport ground crews, few of which have had
> complete background checks, and many of whom have easy access to the
> passenger compartments of airplanes. We're not supposed to think
> about this, just like the movies suspension of disbelief is essential
> to enjoying (or not) the show.

I'm not shocked at all with the number of people that have a "record" in
some form or another. It's what is inside the record that should be taken
into consideration when hiring these people. I don't believe a record
should be instant disqualification for these positions. Probably three
quarters of society have one and you wouldn't even know it. Maybe your
next-door neighbor or your best friend has one? This surely doesn't mean
that they aren't great upstanding members of society and aren't trustworthy.
Just because someone made a mistake, paid their dues, and doing their best
to be a good contributing member of society doesn't give people cart blanc
to look down their noses at them.

Personally, I find it easier and more satisfying to deal with people that
are honest with themselves and have no need to put on a false facade. Scott
Peterson didn't have a record and look what he turned out to be. I wouldn't
want the likes of him rummaging thru my luggage.



Rita
--
http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2003/
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 9:16:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Rita Ä Berkowitz" wrote:
>
> Lisa Horton wrote:
>
> >> You would be shocked at how many people at TSA have criminal records.
> >
> > Not to mention the airport ground crews, few of which have had
> > complete background checks, and many of whom have easy access to the
> > passenger compartments of airplanes. We're not supposed to think
> > about this, just like the movies suspension of disbelief is essential
> > to enjoying (or not) the show.
>
> I'm not shocked at all with the number of people that have a "record" in
> some form or another. It's what is inside the record that should be taken
> into consideration when hiring these people. I don't believe a record
> should be instant disqualification for these positions. Probably three
> quarters of society have one and you wouldn't even know it. Maybe your
> next-door neighbor or your best friend has one? This surely doesn't mean
> that they aren't great upstanding members of society and aren't trustworthy.
> Just because someone made a mistake, paid their dues, and doing their best
> to be a good contributing member of society doesn't give people cart blanc
> to look down their noses at them.
>
> Personally, I find it easier and more satisfying to deal with people that
> are honest with themselves and have no need to put on a false facade. Scott
> Peterson didn't have a record and look what he turned out to be. I wouldn't
> want the likes of him rummaging thru my luggage.
>

Note that I wasn't the author of the "You would be shocked..." line
above, only the lines following that one.

You make a good point though. It depends on what's in the record. A
person busted for pot in their youth is quite a different story than
someone with multiple theft convictions. Alas, both are allowed to work
in airport ground crews at this time.

Lisa
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 10:29:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Last year, I took my 90 year old mother to Oklahoma to visit my sister
and so she could get to see her brand new great-grand daughter.

I guess the fact that I was traveling with my mother marked me as a
suspicious character. They signaled me out for special screening.
This, of course, sent my mother into hysterics. She thought they were
arresting me and taking me away. I kept telling her to go down to the
other end of the security area and I would meet her there. Of course,
she just couldn't understand that. After I cleared the screening, it
took me quite a while to get her calmed back down.

On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
signaled out for special screening. There we went all over again! She
thought that she was being arrested.

So much for the friendly skies!

I just hope things go better on this year's trip!

Gary

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 08:10:24 -0700, "Roger N. Clark (change username to
rnclark)" <username@qwest.net> wrote:

>About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
>Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
>with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
>for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
>These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
>I've carried these for a couple of years without a
>problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
>weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
>taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
>In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
>"New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
>carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
>these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
>less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
>or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
>that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
>allen wrenches were banned.
>
>So don't take any tools on board any more.
>
>Roger
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 1:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

["Followup-To:" header set to rec.photo.digital.]
On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 16:08:32 -0500, Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
> ...... That said, I find it easier to travel as light as
> possible and carry all photography equipment onboard.

The government functionaries running the Illusion Of Security
won't be happy until we show up naked -- without luggage --
and with a RFID chip in our shoulder.
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 2:44:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<<On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
signaled out for special screening.>>
of course, little old ladies are the perfect 'mules' to carry on pounds of
C4 onto the flight in their hollowed canes. those who are travelling with
walkers are especially dangerous because of all the C4 that can fit in the
tubes. and little old ladies are especially effective terrorists because they
do not care if they end their life after 80+ years on the planet already.
team the little old lady with someone who can shove a ballpoint pen into
someone's rectum (those Allen wrenches do an only fair job in a pinch, in spite
of what TSA may think about Allen wrenches as weapons!), and you have a
terrorism team for certain who both must be checked.
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 3:22:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

I used to work for the TSA, I was surprised at the stuff they took from
people! They would even take toy ray guns from kids!
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 3:53:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
> want...
>
> Dave
>

I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any other
interstate highway....please help!
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 4:52:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 00:53:12 GMT, "Gene Palmiter"
<palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote:

>
>"Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> want...
>>
>> Dave
>>
>
>I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
>Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any other
>interstate highway....please help!
______

I think you have to go through Canada.

Marshall
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 6:03:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <ym0xd.3759$RH4.1867@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
"S." <noemail770@noemail.com> wrote:

> Someday our congrssmen will get the balls to
> force sensible screening legislation.
>
What are you smoking?
--
?
?
?
?
LOL
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 6:04:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <3t09s0lc86a9lms7poh8ntqch5a7fp38gt@4ax.com>,
Gary Edstrom <gedstrom@pacbell.net> wrote:

> I just hope things go better on this year's trip!
>
> Gary

Did you vote republican?
--
?
?
?
?
LOL
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 10:35:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital, rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

>
> As I recall, US law requires all US citizens to enter the country on
a
> US passport.

When a passport is required for entry then yes,
it must be a US passport. There's an exception
for young children who can enter the US if listed
in a parent's foreign passport and if other proof
of US citizenship is provided, but it's not used
frequently, especially since many countries
require everyone to have their own individual
passport.

> It doesn't matter that you are a dual national. They must
> have made an administrative exception in your case.

More than likely they just didn't realize that
the person in question was also a US citizen.
A person born abroad whose US citizenship is
via parentage would have nothing listed
in his non-US passport to indicate that
he might be a US citizen.

> > The State Department doesn't really care if you are a dual national

> > - their rules allow it - but Homeland Security sure DOES take an
> > interest...
>
> State department rules only tolerate dual nationality.

If you mean that there's no law saying that dual
nationality is allowed, that's true. But that's
the way it is in most countries. Most countries
don't legislate to specifically allow dual
nationality. Dual nationality results when
there are no laws prohibiting dual nationality.

> It used to be against the law but the supreme court
> ruled that people could have dual nationality.

More precisely, they ruled that performing certain
actions could not automatically cause loss of
US nationality. This nullified the laws that
caused automatic loss of citizenship.

> Now the state department simply considers dual
> nationals as US citizens, and ignores any other
> nationality claim.

That's what most other countries do also. They
consider dual nationals as being one of their
citizens and they ignore any other nationality
claim. They apply their laws that same way
as they do to a person who only holds
that country's nationality. I hold US, Canadian,
and British citizenship. US considers me as a
US citizen, Canada considers me as a Canadian
citizen, and Britain considers me as a British
citizen. None of these countries will treat
me as a foreigner.

> > Special Agent Fulla Bluster would like to ask you a few
questions..."
> > YUP!...and especially about that old Cuban immigration stamp in my
(other
> > country)passport, I bet)
>
> That's a violation of US law. Everyone who is subject to US
> jurisdiction, like dual nationals living in another country, are
> prohibited from travelling to Cuba. (Actually, the prohibition is
> against spending money) Of course the functionaries will be
interested.
> Surprised you didn't get reported to the department that oversees the
> "trading with the enemy act". You might have, actually.
>
> > ROTFLMAO The closest I intend to get to the US in future (or will
probably
> > even be allowed to) is Canada, Mexico...
>
> Simply renounce US citizenship to reduce your grief with passports,
> etc. It's a simple process that you can do at any consulate.

It used to be easy. Now they give you a bit of a hard
time about it.

Stephen Gallagher
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 12:31:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 00:53:12 GMT, "Gene Palmiter"
<palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote:

>
>"Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> want...
>>
>> Dave
>>
>
>I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
>Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any other
>interstate highway....please help!
>
Buy your own boat; it's just like driving!

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 12:44:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Gene Palmiter wrote:
> "Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>
>>I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>>want...
>>
>>Dave
>>
>
>
> I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
> Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any other
> interstate highway....please help!
>
>

Well, the H1, H2 and H3 are all connected, but none leave Oahu,
and none of the other islands have "interstate highways".
Because they are labeled "H" they are Hawaii state highways,
not interstate. Interstates are labeled with "I."

I suppose you could visit via the information superhighway ;-)
If you want to physically follow the information superhighway,
it leaves Oahu at Hunama Bay: divers use it to guide them
beyond the reef (I've done that many times, snorkeling).
But to make it all the way to California, you would need
a very large air tank! ;^)

Roger
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 1:08:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com>, Dave Fouchey
<dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote:

> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
> want...

How is that drive from Hawaii to Colorado (per OP)?

--
--Chip
remove dots in prefix to fix email address
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 1:13:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <zIKdnYQLLuH-41ncRVn-jg@wavecable.com>, C J Campbell
<christophercampbellNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote:

> The list contains disclaimers which allow local examiners to make up their
> own rules. If, in the sole opinion of the checker, you are carrying
> something that could be used as a weapon, then they can confiscate it, fine
> you, or even have you arrested. If you complain, that is a bad attitude,
> which automatically doubles your fine and tacks time on your sentence. Read
> the guidelines for civil actions. It actually says that.

I would like to see that tested in court. I don't see it standing up to
the cold light of day. There are ways to appropriately complain, and if
treated incorrectly then there will be large succesful law suits.

--
--Chip
remove dots in prefix to fix email address
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 3:21:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Gary Edstrom" <gedstrom@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:3t09s0lc86a9lms7poh8ntqch5a7fp38gt@4ax.com...
> Last year, I took my 90 year old mother to Oklahoma to visit my sister
> and so she could get to see her brand new great-grand daughter.
>
> I guess the fact that I was traveling with my mother marked me as a
> suspicious character. They signaled me out for special screening.
> This, of course, sent my mother into hysterics. She thought they were
> arresting me and taking me away. I kept telling her to go down to the
> other end of the security area and I would meet her there. Of course,
> she just couldn't understand that. After I cleared the screening, it
> took me quite a while to get her calmed back down.
>
> On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
> signaled out for special screening. There we went all over again! She
> thought that she was being arrested.
>
> So much for the friendly skies!
>
> I just hope things go better on this year's trip!
>
> Gary
>
-------------

You don't know what real fun is... Try:

....being a dual national of the US + another country but travelling to the
US on the non-US (other country's) passport. [Not with us? Must be with them
ungodly 'forn terrorists!]

Nowadays, the fun starts in the consular [visa] section of the US Embassy...
[Err...why exactly won't you [didn't you] renew your now long expired US
passport? unspoken subtext: You ungrateful, unpatriotic, bastard] but it
continues throughout your journey. The State Department doesn't really care
if you are a dual national - their rules allow it - but Homeland Security
sure DOES take an interest... boy, do they ever! "Step over here, sir...
Special Agent Fulla Bluster would like to ask you a few questions..."
YUP!...and especially about that old Cuban immigration stamp in my (other
country)passport, I bet)

Even more fun and games can be had by disclosing your occupation as
"journalist" but even if you are travelling on a non-working / non-business
visit. Them: "Is that a camera. sir? Do you intend on taking pictures while
in the Unites States?" Me: "Err... no I just carry that as 'mugger bait.'"

ROTFLMAO The closest I intend to get to the US in future (or will probably
even be allowed to) is Canada, Mexico... or maybe another assignment to
Cuba. There's a whole world out there, so who needs the f**king grief?

Journalist
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 4:02:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Journalist-North wrote:
>
> ...being a dual national of the US + another country but travelling to the
> US on the non-US (other country's) passport. [Not with us? Must be with them
> ungodly 'forn terrorists!]

As I recall, US law requires all US citizens to enter the country on a
US passport. It doesn't matter that you are a dual national. They must
have made an administrative exception in your case.

> The State Department doesn't really care if you are a dual national
> - their rules allow it - but Homeland Security sure DOES take an
> interest...

State department rules only tolerate dual nationality. It used to be
against the law, but the supreme court ruled that people could have dual
nationality. Now the state department simply considers dual nationals
as US citizens, and ignores any other nationality claim.

> Special Agent Fulla Bluster would like to ask you a few questions..."
> YUP!...and especially about that old Cuban immigration stamp in my (other
> country)passport, I bet)

That's a violation of US law. Everyone who is subject to US
jurisdiction, like dual nationals living in another country, are
prohibited from travelling to Cuba. (Actually, the prohibition is
against spending money) Of course the functionaries will be interested.
Surprised you didn't get reported to the department that oversees the
"trading with the enemy act". You might have, actually.

> ROTFLMAO The closest I intend to get to the US in future (or will probably
> even be allowed to) is Canada, Mexico...

Simply renounce US citizenship to reduce your grief with passports,
etc. It's a simple process that you can do at any consulate. Of
course, that might open up a whole new set of questions and suspicions
when you enter the country.
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 7:17:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

sgallagher@rogers.com wrote:
>
> >
> > As I recall, US law requires all US citizens to enter the country
> > on a US passport.
>
> When a passport is required for entry then yes,
> it must be a US passport.

Thank you for pointing that out.

US regulations do not require US citizens to have a passport if they are
entering from a country in the Americas, only proof of citizenship and a
photo ID. Since most countries other than Canada, Mexico, and a couple
of Caribbean countries require US citizens to have passports, the
concept is somewhat moot for anyone traveling elsewhere.
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 9:37:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <41C44860.8000203@qwest.net>, username@qwest.net says...
> About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> allen wrenches were banned.
>
> So don't take any tools on board any more.
>
> Roger

Time to write the congressman, I suppose.
--
http://www.pbase.com/bcbaird/
Anonymous
December 19, 2004 9:37:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Brian C. Baird" wrote:
>
> In article <41C44860.8000203@qwest.net>, username@qwest.net says...
> > About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> > Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> > with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> > for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> > These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> > I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> > problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> > weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> > taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> > In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> > "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> > carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> > these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> > less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> > or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> > that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> > allen wrenches were banned.
> >
> > So don't take any tools on board any more.
> >
> > Roger
>

Just be aware that the only way they'll pay attention is if your note is
written on a check.

Lisa
December 19, 2004 9:37:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

Lisa Horton wrote:

>
> "Brian C. Baird" wrote:
>
>>In article <41C44860.8000203@qwest.net>, username@qwest.net says...
>>
>>>About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
>>>Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
>>>with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
>>>for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
>>>These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
>>>I've carried these for a couple of years without a
>>>problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
>>>weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
>>>taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
>>>In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
>>>"New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
>>>carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
>>>these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
>>>less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
>>>or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
>>>that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
>>>allen wrenches were banned.
>>>
>>>So don't take any tools on board any more.
>>>
>>>Roger
>>
>
> Just be aware that the only way they'll pay attention is if your note is
> written on a check.
>
> Lisa


....or in the border of several large bills.

--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 12:12:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <41C44860.8000203@qwest.net>, change username to rnclark
<username@qwest.net> wrote:

>SNIP<
> I was flagged for carrying a potential
> weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> these wrenches.
>SNIP<

See
http://www.redrat.net/work/photographic/homeland_securi...
for more information on Homeland Security.

Phil

--
Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip@
http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 7:25:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:Yh4xd.687$Ff3.387@trndny04...
>
> "Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> want...
>>
>> Dave
>>
>
> I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
> Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any
> other
> interstate highway....please help!
>

Where is Darwin when we need him?

S.
>
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 7:50:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital, rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

> > > As I recall, US law requires all US citizens to enter the country

> > > on a US passport.
> >
> > When a passport is required for entry then yes,
> > it must be a US passport.
>
> Thank you for pointing that out.
>
> US regulations do not require US citizens to have a passport if they
are
> entering from a country in the Americas, only proof of citizenship
and a
> photo ID. Since most countries other than Canada, Mexico, and a
couple
> of Caribbean countries require US citizens to have passports, the
> concept is somewhat moot for anyone traveling elsewhere.

No problem. I pointed it out, only because
my experience when posting on this topic has
shown that if you just say that a US passport
is required for entry, someone will counter
that a passport isn't required when entering
from (Canada, Mexico, etc....)

Interestingly enough, a US passport would be
required when entering from one of those
countries IF the traveller had entered that
country directly from an area outside of the
Americas. So, a US citizen travelling from Europe
to Canada and then into the US is supposed to
present a US passport (and not just proof of
citizenship plus photo ID). How can US immigration
discern that you are entering from "further abroad"?
Sometimes they can and sometimes they can't.

Lastly, it should be pointed out that a passport
is considered to be both proof of citizenship AND
photo ID. I remember a recent thread where people
were arguing that because the requirement to enter
from Canada was to have proof of citizenship AND
photo ID, they were interpreting it to mean that a
US citizen using a passport to enter from Canada
would have to present both a US passport AND a separate
piece of photo ID. Separate photo ID is only required
when the document proving citizenship has no built-in
photo ID.

Stephen Gallagher
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 1:01:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital, rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

They took my PDA stylus. It had come loose and was at the bottom of
the bag. They told me if it was in the PDA it wouldn't have been a
problem - the fact that it was on its own was the problem. Didn't
matter that I showed them that it belonged to the PDA by slotting it
back in - they said it was too late. Ironic thing I also had a full
size pen/stylus combo in my bag! Where is the logic?

wayne wrote:
> Denver TSA has always been pretty lame I have a small razor knife
that is
> the size of a key it has gone thru the screenings dozens of time in
my
> carryon and in the little tray for keys. However when I tried to use
an
> expired passport for an ID they said no.
> http://custom-studios.com/keytags.htm. I checked the TSA site and
could not
> find anything as far as ID is concerned
>
> Wayne
>
> "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <username@qwest.net>
wrote in
> message news:41C44860.8000203@qwest.net...
> > About two weeks ago I left for Hawaii from the
> > Denver airport. I was carrying a small photo backpack
> > with my usual gear, including 2 small allen wrenches
> > for the screws on my Wimberly mounting plates.
> > These are small, ~1 mm and ~2 mm, allen wrenches.
> > I've carried these for a couple of years without a
> > problem. I was flagged for carrying a potential
> > weapon, my bag went through secondary screening, including
> > taking it all apart to find the wrenches.
> > In discussing the issue with TSA, they said there is a
> > "New" rule that says no tools of any kind are allowed as
> > carry-on. A TSA guy said you could poke someone with
> > these wrenches. I pointed out how much smaller and
> > less effective small allen wrenches were than keys
> > or nail clippers (which are allowed). His answer was
> > that the higher ups know more than we do, and the
> > allen wrenches were banned.
> >
> > So don't take any tools on board any more.
> >
> > Roger
> >
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 2:32:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"S." wrote:
>
> "Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:Yh4xd.687$Ff3.387@trndny04...
> >
> > "Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
> > news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
> >> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
> >> want...
> >>
> >> Dave
> >>
> >
> > I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
> > Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any
> > other
> > interstate highway....please help!
> >
>
> Where is Darwin when we need him?
>

Keeping an eye on erratic SUV drivers in the rain :) 

Lisa
December 26, 2004 1:27:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 11:32:06 -0800, Lisa Horton
<Lisa091704@lisahorton.net> wrote:

>
>
>"S." wrote:
>>
>> "Gene Palmiter" <palmiter_gene@verizon.net> wrote in message
>> news:Yh4xd.687$Ff3.387@trndny04...
>> >
>> > "Dave Fouchey" <dfouchey@sc.rr.com> wrote in message
>> > news:fcr8s0hv3escbqj2ig16q23l8oap0ko51g@4ax.com...
>> >> I drive, saves an awful lot of trouble and I get to carry anything I
>> >> want...
>> >>
>> >> Dave
>> >>
>> >
>> > I want to take photos in Hawaii...and I too would rather drive. I know
>> > Hawaii has an interstate highway...but I can't find where it joins any
>> > other
>> > interstate highway....please help!
>> >
>>
>> Where is Darwin when we need him?
>>
>
>Keeping an eye on erratic SUV drivers in the rain :) 
You mean the ones talking on their cell phones?

Around here the rain is normally pretty solid this time of year.
Right now it's about a foot deep, but it's supposed to make 40 F
Wednesday so the stuff should melt.

Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
(N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
www.rogerhalstead.com
>
>Lisa
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 3:02:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <username@qwest.net> wrote in
message news:41C5B006.70803@qwest.net...
>
> Well, the H1, H2 and H3 are all connected, but none leave Oahu,
> and none of the other islands have "interstate highways".
> Because they are labeled "H" they are Hawaii state highways,
> not interstate. Interstates are labeled with "I."

Wrong! They are not state highways, interstates are not always labeled with
"I", and surely you've noticed that the H-1, H-2, and H-3 markers are the
standard red, white, and blue shields that are used for all interstate
markers. They don't need to leave Oahu because the neighbor islands don't
have similarly large military bases. For more info:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_highway


--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 4:20:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In my previous posting on this subject which appears following this
update, I said that I hoped things would go better this year. That was
certainly wishful thinking.

Once again, exactly one year later, we left from Burbank airport in
California for Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is very convenient to where we live.
We checked in and took our bags over to security screening. They swipe
the bags with a small cloth which they then place in a scanner. My
mom's bag passed just fine. When they came to my bag, I really wasn't
paying attention, but all of a sudden two additional security guards
came over to me. They had detected high explosives on my bag. So now
they did an extremely detailed search and scan of the inside of the bag
and of myself. They also registered me in their database of security
violations.

Of course, all of this sent my elderly mother into hysterics again. She
thought that they were going to arrest me. Finally, they asked me if I
worked near any construction site. I told them that the building across
the street from where I work had been undergoing major renovations.
They said that the site was probably using explosives and that the
residue of some explosions had probably settled in my car. When I laid
the bag in the trunk of my car, it probably picked up the residue and
that that was probably what set off their alarm.

I was on my way at last!

So much for the friendly skies!

Gary

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 19:29:04 GMT, Gary Edstrom <gedstrom@pacbell.net>
wrote:

>Last year, I took my 90 year old mother to Oklahoma to visit my sister
>and so she could get to see her brand new great-grand daughter.
>
>I guess the fact that I was traveling with my mother marked me as a
>suspicious character. They signaled me out for special screening.
>This, of course, sent my mother into hysterics. She thought they were
>arresting me and taking me away. I kept telling her to go down to the
>other end of the security area and I would meet her there. Of course,
>she just couldn't understand that. After I cleared the screening, it
>took me quite a while to get her calmed back down.
>
>On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
>signaled out for special screening. There we went all over again! She
>thought that she was being arrested.
>
>So much for the friendly skies!
>
>I just hope things go better on this year's trip!
>
>Gary
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 4:50:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Gary Edstrom writes:

>
>Of course, all of this sent my elderly mother into hysterics again. She
>thought that they were going to arrest me. Finally, they asked me if I
>worked near any construction site. I told them that the building across
>the street from where I work had been undergoing major renovations.
>They said that the site was probably using explosives and that the
>residue of some explosions had probably settled in my car. When I laid
>the bag in the trunk of my car, it probably picked up the residue and
>that that was probably what set off their alarm.
>
>I was on my way at last!
>
>So much for the friendly skies!

Heh. I can just see my now deceased Mom in such a situation. She could be
downright cruel when dealing with idiots.

Friendly skies. More like the early '70s cartoon of "Fly united" with two
ducks positioned as you might guess. And you can bet, Joe Average Traveler is
the bottom duck.

Charlie Self
"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder
respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." George Orwell
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 4:50:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 27 Dec 2004 13:50:44 GMT, charliediy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self)
wrote:

>Gary Edstrom writes:
>
>>
>>Of course, all of this sent my elderly mother into hysterics again. She
>>thought that they were going to arrest me. Finally, they asked me if I
>>worked near any construction site. I told them that the building across
>>the street from where I work had been undergoing major renovations.
>>They said that the site was probably using explosives and that the
>>residue of some explosions had probably settled in my car. When I laid
>>the bag in the trunk of my car, it probably picked up the residue and
>>that that was probably what set off their alarm.
>>
>>I was on my way at last!
>>
>>So much for the friendly skies!
>
>Heh. I can just see my now deceased Mom in such a situation. She could be
>downright cruel when dealing with idiots.

Just out of curiosity, what idiots are you referring to?
The ones who are doing their jobs, who did the required test, came up
with a positive result for explosives, and took the required steps?
Those idiots? The ones who, when they found no danger, sent you on
your way? Those idiots?
I wonder what you'd be thinking about the system if your plane were in
pieces, with you still seatbelted into your seat as it hurtled towards
the ground, after being blown apart by a bomb that wasn't noticed
because the inspectors were afraid of being called idiots.

>
>Friendly skies. More like the early '70s cartoon of "Fly united" with two
>ducks positioned as you might guess. And you can bet, Joe Average Traveler is
>the bottom duck.
>
>Charlie Self
>"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder
>respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind." George Orwell

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"
December 27, 2004 6:10:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"Gary Edstrom" <gedstrom@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:cq20t09rpujcf6md7cbl4vvooj9jr225p7@4ax.com...

> They said that the site was probably using explosives and that the
> residue of some explosions had probably settled in my car. When I laid
> the bag in the trunk of my car, it probably picked up the residue and
> that that was probably what set off their alarm.
>
> So much for the friendly skies!

I understand the hassle and the anxiety that goes with all that - I travel
on business and sometimes carry items that set off alarms, so I know what
you've been thru. But I'd rather have that situation than the result of not
detecting such things.

I guess the bottom line in these cases is whether you make your plane.
Getting erroneously caught in the detection system and missing your plane
before TSA relents would be a very different situation.

Bob in Las Vegas
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 8:31:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 19:29:04 GMT, Gary Edstrom <gedstrom@pacbell.net>
wrote/replied to:

>Last year, I took my 90 year old mother to Oklahoma to visit my sister
>and so she could get to see her brand new great-grand daughter.
>
>I guess the fact that I was traveling with my mother marked me as a
>suspicious character. They signaled me out for special screening.
>This, of course, sent my mother into hysterics. She thought they were
>arresting me and taking me away. I kept telling her to go down to the
>other end of the security area and I would meet her there. Of course,
>she just couldn't understand that. After I cleared the screening, it
>took me quite a while to get her calmed back down.
>
>On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
>signaled out for special screening. There we went all over again! She
>thought that she was being arrested.
>
>So much for the friendly skies!

You Americans keep the hell out of other countries' business and we'd
all have less hassles. Oh ya, and make friends with the Arabs fer geez
sakes.

--
Jim Davis, Nature Photography:
http://jimdavis.oberro.com/
Motorcycle Relay Kits:
http://www.easternbeaver.com/
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 8:31:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

"James B. Davis" <jbdavis@hkg.odn.ne.jp> wrote in message
news:7b62t0l93fthmavdeb384t6h52s4bkeke6@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 19:29:04 GMT, Gary Edstrom <gedstrom@pacbell.net>
> wrote/replied to:
>
>>Last year, I took my 90 year old mother to Oklahoma to visit my sister
>>and so she could get to see her brand new great-grand daughter.
>>
>>I guess the fact that I was traveling with my mother marked me as a
>>suspicious character. They signaled me out for special screening.
>>This, of course, sent my mother into hysterics. She thought they were
>>arresting me and taking me away. I kept telling her to go down to the
>>other end of the security area and I would meet her there. Of course,
>>she just couldn't understand that. After I cleared the screening, it
>>took me quite a while to get her calmed back down.
>>
>>On the way back home, the situation was reversed: SHE was the one
>>signaled out for special screening. There we went all over again! She
>>thought that she was being arrested.
>>
>>So much for the friendly skies!
>
> You Americans keep the hell out of other countries' business and we'd
> all have less hassles. Oh ya, and make friends with the Arabs fer geez
> sakes.
>

Death to all Arabs and their sympathizers.
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 8:31:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

In article <WucAd.11121$RH4.803@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
"S." <noemail770@noemail.com> wrote:
>
> Death to

*Plonk*

One more dipshit.
--
Is this a feeble attempt at a troll? Since its cross posted 9 out of 10
people would say yes. In my book its another pointless post from another
nameless nobody. I hope it made you feel better.
--
LOL.
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 8:37:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital,rec.photo.technique.nature (More info?)

On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 13:20:27 GMT, Gary Edstrom <gedstrom@pacbell.net>
wrote/replied to:

>They had detected high explosives on my bag. So now
>they did an extremely detailed search and scan of the inside of the bag
>and of myself. They also registered me in their database of security
>violations.

Wait a sec, are you saying that you violated some regulation? It
doesn't sound like you did to me. If not, then why would you be
registered in their database of violations? You're kidding, right?

Maybe you'll make it to Cuba after all :-)


--
Jim Davis, Nature Photography:
http://jimdavis.oberro.com/
Motorcycle Relay Kits:
http://www.easternbeaver.com/
!