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Worth the jump?

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April 1, 2011 7:02:08 PM

(since nobody answered me in the ASUS forum i wanna try here)

I've been thinking of changing my motherboard to a newer one,but some people says it's not worth,but they just focus on the hard drive and RAM without looking at the CPU n stuff

Actual PC:

-Motherboard: ASUS P5K-Deluxe
-RAM: 4GB DDR2@667mhz
-CPU: Intel C2D E8400@3Ghz (NO OC)
-GPU: GIGABYTE 460GTX 1GB (NO OC)
-HDD: Western Digital 1TB Caviar Blue SATA3 (6Gbps,thou works 3Gbps)

The components i'm lookin to change

-Motherboard: ASUS P8p67 B3 Revision
-RAM: 8GB DDR3 1033/1066 or something
-CPU: Intel I-5 2400 3,1Ghz

These are the programs and stuff i constantly use:

-Photoshop CS5 64bits
-Adobe Illustrator CS5
-Team Fortress 2
-Any actual game that requires much PC requirements
-Winrar 4? 64bits
-Western Digital My Book Essentials 2TB USB 3.0/2.0
-Pinnacle Studio 12/15 (Used lots)
-Sony Vegas Pro 9/10 64bits
-Windows 7 Home Premium 64bits

Note: i dont like doing overclocking,neither my actual CPU/GPU nor the possible comin one

I hope that with this the W7 start up,games and programs runs fast or produces/renders better without slowdowns with faster processings,also SATA3 6Gbps and USB 3.0

Do you think it's worth the jump or i should stick with my actual PC?...

Thanks in advance

More about : worth jump

a c 109 V Motherboard
April 1, 2011 11:28:55 PM

In my opinion, the hardware you have now is sufficient for the software you use. However, upgrading with the choices you've made will certainly show performance increases.

Are you experiencing any difficulties with your current system while running these programs? If so, explain in detail.
April 2, 2011 6:18:58 AM

Not seein any diffs here,but i tought that upgradin to a new generation of components would help overall and also make better use of 64bits *Shrugs*,and since i'm using 7 and DX11 etc well..

but if it's not that worth just say it,there's no hurries with the upgrade since it's damn hard to find these ASUS boards now (Gigabyte already has B3,but i dun trust it when it comes to MoBo's (thou as you can see i own the 460GTX coz well,XFX didnt made the 400 series GPUs..and an ASUS GPU died on me on first run)
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April 2, 2011 2:53:40 PM

i'm a CHICKEN with the OCs...aka i'm TOTALLY AFRAID of BURNING the CPU...i dont wanna toast something that costs ~170-200€!
April 2, 2011 3:09:23 PM

i would go for a i5 2500K rather than 2400
May 5, 2011 3:15:32 PM

Ok,sorry for not replying in time but ive been busy at job and still thinking with this...

First of all,NO,i still dont have the new rig because of some reasons...

1.I've seen these SSD hard drives...sure,they're lightning fast n stuff..but they "die easily"...also you must touch the BIOS n stuff to make it fully working...and also you must enable AHCI? mode on to work to the max,but then my HDD would NOT WORK,wich's essential...sadly they dont improve performance on games except on loading screens...

2.Will i notice performance on 32bit games (GAMES) on XP tween my E8400 and a 2500 (WITHOUT K,again,no OC'er) as in FPS?...also speed on programs?

3.Same as 2,but with 64bits Windows 7 Home Premium.

4.Will the USB 3.0 ports on the mobo' i've mentioned work on Windows XP with a USB 3.0 device at full speed?,even if i need to put some drivers in it (obviously?)

I've checked the prices of the components i've mentioned of lookin forward (thou 4GB of DDR3 1333mhz RAM + Zalman CNPS10X Extreme or something) and everything on my end costs TOTAL: 415,12€

Help please?
a c 109 V Motherboard
May 6, 2011 8:22:42 PM

In regards to your concerns...

1. The SSDs don't "die easily", rather they have a lower life expectancy because it is flash-based memory. Flash memory is "faster" because of access times reading/writing don't have the movement of arms/discs before the reading/writing begins, as the HDDs do. AHCI is the preferred method for most SSDs, because there are often a lot of IDE setting-related failures when the SSD is in IDE mode.

2. As far as performance goes, the only true benefit, as you already know, is load times. Since the SSD will make all load times quicker, you'll access just about everything sooner. This will improve your efficiency, rather than performance.

3. Like 2, but also note that a 64-bit OS allows for higher memory addressing. A lot of games, FPS included, are GPU and RAM dependant. Because of this, having more RAM density (GB), you'll be able to feed the memory-hungry games/apps. So, the difference between a 32-bit and 64-bit is significant, in terms of RAM and CPU addressing.

4. The USB speed/technology is in the device(s). So, as long as both the mobo and device are 3.0, the data transfer will be up to 3GB/s.
May 6, 2011 8:39:50 PM

1 n 2 n 3. wont buy an SSD then...i'm an XP user more than 7 (7 till i get the new PC components) and IDE will be more active,so it'll have more failures so you say...

4. 3GB/s is the max for XP,or is there more when it comes to 7 32/64bits?.The device i'm talking about is a "Western Digital My Book Essentials USB 2.0 + 3.0" (new new)

Sides of that,another load of questions related to P8P67 B3 board:

1.I've seen people saying they got their P8P67 B3 boards "Dead on Arrival" or dying after 2 weeks of use...what would be the reason of it?,it's kinda recent

2.I've seen people saying they were not able to access the EFI BIOS with a Logitech G15 keyboard / G15 Mouse (Logitech too)..does it means the BIOS has a huge problem when it comes to USB devices???..coz i've got my KBoard and Mouse into USB mode and i dun have the PS/2 adapter (i dunno if there's one to be bought separatedly)....Is it true?,does it happens on the default BIOS it comes with the board or do you have to change your keyboard or something? (that's a huge worry if i have to change the AHCI default to IDE for XP/7)

3.Any other things i should know about this board,like recent problems or things to do after installing the board or whatever?...

Thanks for the reply btw
May 9, 2011 10:56:51 AM

*BUMP*
May 19, 2011 3:54:45 PM

Don't bump posts
May 19, 2011 3:57:06 PM

it was getting old and nobody replied to the question,so i tought i would remind them about it ^^;
a c 109 V Motherboard
May 19, 2011 6:20:42 PM

DV2 said:
1 n 2 n 3. wont buy an SSD then...i'm an XP user more than 7 (7 till i get the new PC components) and IDE will be more active,so it'll have more failures so you say...


IDE is old technology. Even if you're comfortable with it, consider learning about the benefits of SATA, becasue IDE is phasing out. In a few years, you won't be able to find IDE interface devices.

DV2 said:
4. 3GB/s is the max for XP,or is there more when it comes to 7 32/64bits?.The device i'm talking about is a "Western Digital My Book Essentials USB 2.0 + 3.0" (new new)


The USB speed is relative to the device, not software. Meaning XP has no control over how fast (or slow) your data transfers, save for any indirect effects, such as data corruption. USB devices communicate via USB host. The host controller directs traffic flow to devices, so no USB device can transfer any data on the bus without an explicit request from the host controller. In USB 2.0, the host controller polls the bus for traffic, usually in a round-robin fashion. The slowest device connected to a controller sets the bandwidth of the interface. For SuperSpeed USB (defined since USB 3.0), connected devices can request service from host. Because there are two separate controllers in each USB 3.0 host, USB 3.0 devices will transmit and receive at USB 3.0 data rates regardless of USB 2.0 or earlier devices connected to that host. Operating data rates for them will be set in the legacy manner.


DV2 said:

Sides of that,another load of questions related to P8P67 B3 board:

1.I've seen people saying they got their P8P67 B3 boards "Dead on Arrival" or dying after 2 weeks of use...what would be the reason of it?,it's kinda recent
This really depends on several factors:
1. Manufcaturer - Do you know if the people who said their boards were DOA bought the same manufacturer's product? If so, it could've been a bad lot.

Similarly, mobo manufacturers outsource their builds to several other manufacturing plants; whom rely on several other manufacturer's parts to complete the mobo build. For example, let's say Company A is the manufactuer (name) on the mobo; however, they outsource to Company B to actually put the boards together (make). Company B uses Company C for parts and buys in bulk. Typically, when companies buy in bulk, they buy in lots. Each lot consists of X amount of product. So, in this example, let's say that Company C manufactured bad capacitors (a common problem, actually). These bad capacitors were sold and sent to Company B. Company B, not knowing the capacitors were bad, finished their manufacturing process and sent completed mobos back to Company A.

Now enter The Retailer. The Retailer stocks mobos from Company A, and it just so happens that they received a lot of mobos made with bad capacitors. Customers who want the latest tech, or just simply want to build a new system because their current system is old and dysfunctional, purchase these poorly constructed mobos. Upon use, these customers discover the problem with the capacitors (let's say they leak or pop), clearly these new mobos are well within their warranty window, so the customers contact The Retailer and request an RMA. The Retailer, unaware of the bad lot of mobos, sends out a replacement (same make, model, and revision number).

When the above mentioned problem happens to too many customers, it "raises a red flag" and then The Retailer looks into the problem. After learning that of the 400 mobos in the lot, 350 have blown capacitors (example), The Retailer will contact Company A to make them aware of the problem. This is when a new version of the model will be researched and developed.

To sum this all up, mass production of anything is motivated by one simple equation: Time equals money. This equation can loosely be translated into "the faster a product is manufactured, the faster it can be sold." However, with mass production, templates or molds are used; and if something goes wrong with the mold/template while production is in progress, it is likely that everything made from those molds/templates will have an adverse effect. In the case of your concern, DOA mobos.

DV2 said:
2.I've seen people saying they were not able to access the EFI BIOS with a Logitech G15 keyboard / G15 Mouse (Logitech too)..does it means the BIOS has a huge problem when it comes to USB devices???..coz i've got my KBoard and Mouse into USB mode and i dun have the PS/2 adapter (i dunno if there's one to be bought separatedly)....Is it true?,does it happens on the default BIOS it comes with the board or do you have to change your keyboard or something? (that's a huge worry if i have to change the AHCI default to IDE for XP/7)
Again, this is subjective. To say that any P67-based mobo will not work with the Logitech G15 is a stretch. The problem with a keyboard and mouse are relative to the current hardware and software being used in conjunction with said keyboard and mouse. Although, I can certainly appreciate the concern. Best you can do if you run into this problem is to use a different mouse/keyboard combo. If the concern is duplicated, contact Logitech for assistance.

DV2 said:
3.Any other things i should know about this board,like recent problems or things to do after installing the board or whatever?...
All-in-all, building a computer is always a game of chance. There is no guarantee anyone (not even manufacturers) can give you that your system will work flawlessly; be it on initial boot, or subsequent boots. This is why RMA and warranties exist.

DV2 said:
Thanks for the reply btw

!