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New 1.25 V G.Skill Sniper DDR3 memory better to OC ?

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  • Memory
  • G.SKILL
  • DDR3
  • Product
Last response: in Memory
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April 1, 2011 8:19:40 PM

Good day lads !

I was shopping for Ripjaws X memory 1600Mhz 1.5 V on G.Skill website and I stumbled on that new Sniper 1600Mhz 1.25 V DDR3 :

www.gskill.com/products.php?index=390

Since I am noob in OCing and this will be my first experience on my new 2500k system, is it safer to OC with 1.25 V memory modules to avoid frying anything ?

It should lower the internal temperature as well right ? Since I am not going to watercool my system should I look more seriously to that lower voltage memory, or should I spend the same money on lower latency memory with higher voltage ?

Should I consider 4 x 2 Gb or 2 x 4 Gb for OCing and better Stability on my ASUS P8P67 DELUXE mobo ??

Thank you so much for your time !

Alex

More about : skill sniper ddr3 memory

a c 347 } Memory
April 1, 2011 8:44:09 PM

I've read about them and the only thing that I can agree with is lower voltage is, duh, lower power consumption {90% or 10% less}, but the heat of 1.65 or in particular 1.50v is NOT a problem -- at all even 4GB sticks. However, in now rare 8GB sticks sure 1.25v is a plus.

To add, the1.50v RAM with efficient SB CPU is a lesser burden for the SB CPU IMC, and so I only recommend 1.50v DDR3 with SB. I've also found smaller 'nm' RAM, lower voltage are often more efficient, but also slower. ;) 
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a b } Memory
April 2, 2011 1:11:44 AM

The reason that low-voltage memory is coming out is that the next generations of CPUs will require it (Intel's anyway, don't know about AMD). Sandy Bridge "E", Ivy Bridge, and beyond will need the lower-voltage RAM. They are simply releasing them early and testing them out on current CPUs and chipsets.

RAM is independent of the overclocking on Sandy Bridge systems. You keep the RAM at stock and overclock the CPU itself.

Just get some standard 1.5v memory. DDR3-1600 CL9 is plenty fast for current Sandy Bridge processors. You can get CL8 or CL7 memory, but in my opinion it's a waste of money.
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April 2, 2011 3:35:11 AM

I see ...

would you suggest 1 kit of dual 4 Gb or 2 pairs of dual 2 Gb 1.5 V to get to 8 Bb ? What is more efficient and stable when OCing ?

Thanks

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a c 347 } Memory
April 2, 2011 4:15:07 AM

I'm a big fan of the G.SKILL Ripjaws X series, and I agree with @Leaps-from-Shadows about 1600 CAS 9. Nice article -> http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

Sold out:
$99 1600 CAS 9-9-9-24 @ 1.5v F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If you need something now:
$129 1600 CAS 8-8-8-24 @ 1.5v Model F3-12800CL8D-8GBXM http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$105 1333 CAS 7-7-7-21 @ 1.5v Model F3-10666CL7D-8GBXH http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b } Memory
April 2, 2011 6:53:15 AM

I have 12GB of Ripjaws X 1600 CL9 (one 2x4GB kit and one 2x2GB kit) so I know Sandy Bridge is rock-solid stable while overclocking with all four slots filled. Because you won't actually be overclocking the RAM on a Sandy Bridge system, either 2x4GB or 4x2GB is fine. Just for future upgrade purposes though, 2x4GB is better.
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April 2, 2011 1:10:44 PM

Thank you for your relplies Leaps & Jaquith, I will stick to my first choice, Ripjaws X 1600 CL9 2 x 4GB and I'll add a second kit before they vanish from the market.

Your help is appreciated.

Alex
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April 11, 2011 2:44:28 AM

Best answer selected by alexandrelegrand.
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