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How many times can I do a clean install of Win 7 on same computer?

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November 1, 2011 12:36:17 PM

Hello,

I upgraded from Vista to 7 on my old motherboard which was successful. I then upgraded to a new motherboard so a clean installation had to be done by calling up Microsoft which was also successful. Both 32 bit versions.

Now I want to do a clean install to 64 bit to take advantage of the extra RAM. Can I do this many installs? I still have the upgrade disc and product key.

Also, with a previous clean install, all my old folders were compressed into a folder in the new install. Will this also happen when moving it to 64 bit? No changes to the hardware has been made.

Additionally, what happens to all the old drivers? Does the clean install just remove them or are they there in the background? Should I un-install everything before doing the clean install?

Thanks in advance.

Vic
November 1, 2011 4:28:04 PM

nikorr said:
What do u have OEM? Upgrade or Retail DVD?

Windows 7 Versions [Explained]
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/23305-63-windows-vers...


Hello,

I brought a PC with Vista installed on it which I assume would be OEM and then brought the upgrade pack to upgrade it to Windows 7 Premium.

Does that help?

Thanks

Vic
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November 1, 2011 4:33:41 PM

You will have to do a clean install going from 32 bit to 64 bit, which means you have to backup your data. You have to re-install all your programs. If you have an issue witht eactivation, you should try to activate over the internet and if that fails call Microsoft and tell them you are re-installing on the same computer.
November 1, 2011 4:52:24 PM

viclaw said:
Hello,

I brought a PC with Vista installed on it which I assume would be OEM and then brought the upgrade pack to upgrade it to Windows 7 Premium.

Does that help?

Thanks

Vic


Regarding activation: As far as I know, you can install Win 7 as many times as you like (provided you have a valid upgrade path, which you do in this instance), on one machine at a time.
Usually, you get 5 auto-activates via internet; after the 5th you'll have to call Microsoft each time you reinstall.

Upgrading from 32 --> 64 is much the same as upgrading from Vista to 7; run a custom install, don't destroy or format any partitions, and you should see your Windows.old folder on the new 64-bit install as well.

You will have to reinstall all your programs.

Driver support shouldn't be a problem if your current 32-bit Win 7 installation had a driver for everything. 64-bit support has gotten much better with 7, and I'm fairly certain most of the standard MS drivers have 64-bit counterparts.
!