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CPU Shutdown on its own

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May 27, 2010 5:41:48 AM

Hi everyone,

It's been a while since I've come back to tomshardware. The issue I'm having here is, today I was compressing a video file using VirtuaDub, and I was using Ventrilo at the same time. When I cued up my mic to talk in vent, my PC crashed as if someone pulled the cord. I was also ingame, playing Aion at the same time. Then, I load up Aion again, and I checked the GPU temperatures, 76 degrees F before PC shutdown, again. Then...I loaded it again, after installing new drivers.

PC shutoff again. Now, I tried a different game. CS:Source. PC shutdown 15 minutes into it. Didn't see temperatures. When I am not in a game, the PC is fine. If I am watching a graphic intensive movie, its fine. It's only when gaming (and, starting today) where the issue starts to surface.

GEFORCE 8800GTS 320MB
3.75 GB DDR2 RAM
500GB HD (1 month old, new)
CORSAIR 650 PSW (1 month old, new)
CORE 2 DUO 2.4GHZ

I haven't tried any diagnostics. Just trial and error. Last memtest86 I ran was a month ago. Came back fine. I ran the Counter-Strike: Source video stress test, came back at 222 FPS @ 1920X1080 wides creen resolution. Please note I have minor cooling issues, requiring me to leave my side case open...I have reseated everything recently, but I haven't cleaned the PC out as of lately. Doesn't look too bad, minor dust build up...any suggestions?

**Okay, so I think I found my problem. My BIOs has the CPU Shutdown temperature @ 70 degrees C. Now, I don't know what temperature is good/bad for CPU cores...but, it's going above 70 and it shuts down. I can disable it, but don't know if I should. Any advice?

More about : cpu shutdown

a b U Graphics card
May 27, 2010 7:26:38 AM

70 degrees C is bad for the CPU. The automatic shutdown is there for a reason. The most probable cause of CPU's overheat is bad contact with its cooler. You need to remove the cooler, clean the old thermal paste layer and apply a new one.
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May 27, 2010 7:34:11 AM

I'm being told that 70C isn't bad. But, newegg expert chat users say that 100C is considered hot
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a b U Graphics card
May 27, 2010 8:48:42 AM

What are the actual temperatures of your CPU's cores in idle mode and during load? You can use 'Core Temp' to check it out. Temperatures between 70C to 100C isn't bad for a GPU but can cause meltdown to a CPU. For instance, in a room temperature of 27C, my E6850 (C2D @ 3GHz) idles at 30C and rises to 45C during intensive loads such as playing Crysis.
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a c 130 U Graphics card
May 27, 2010 10:04:46 AM

The TDP (Thermal design point) of that chip is 75 so your board is set to shut down 5 degrees before that which seems fair/sensible.

I'm fairly sure that there has to be an issue with the CPU cooler here its either that or the temp isn't being reported properly.
Working from cold, take the side off and start up the PC watch the CPU Cooler fan to see that its running for a start.

It shouldn't have come loose but its possible so check that its clamped down securely as well.


Mactronix

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a b U Graphics card
May 27, 2010 11:28:26 AM

Clean your heat sink and processor and apply a new coat of thermal compound ,Check the temps after that and return here


@nEe$h
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May 27, 2010 8:11:24 PM

Yeah, now everyone I've come across some new information here:

On idle, my CPU temperatures are reporting for each processor: 46C, 45C.
Underload, it goes to 67+, and once it peaks to 74C, it shuts off. I've thoroughly cleaned two of the computer fans and blew out some dust from the heat sink as much as I can without removing it. I just called Best Buy, all they have is a generic thermal compound. Should I use this? I really don't want to order one and wait until Wednesday to get it seeing as how it's 3 day delivery, but not on weekends. :-(

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Dynex%26%23174%3B+-+Thermal...

Should I get this one? Or, is there such a big difference in using something else, that it would save me alot of money in the future if I ordered it from newegg?
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May 27, 2010 9:21:10 PM

Mactronix,

Luckily, I was able to buy that product from Radioshack. They had one left. Now, is there a step-by-step or, removing heatsink/thermal compound and reapplying thermal compound/reinstalling heatsink for dummies guide available? :/ 
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May 27, 2010 9:41:07 PM

First run the computer just to warm it up, you want to soften the old therm compound.
After system is warm, shutdown and unplug from wall.
Remove clips holding down cooler but leave cpu installed/locked in motherboard.
With clips removed slightly rotate cooler to see if comes loose from cpu which should indicate they're not dried together.
Once you can see they haven't become attached remove cooler first and if necessary only remove cpu to clean it.
While there are multiple application methods suggestion: apply pea sized glob in center of cpu, attach heatsink avoiding any movement other than the pressure of locking it down. This will allow the pressure to move the compound outward and avoid any air pockets within it.
Use computer, good luck
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May 28, 2010 4:51:30 AM

Hi guys,

So I bought the Arctic Silver 5 from Radio Shack. I unplugged my computer, removed the heatsink, cleaned everything off with 70% alcohol wipes, thorougly - and applied the compound. Now, I put the heatsink back in, but one of the fasteners broke while clipping in. So now, 3/4 of the heatsink is being put in.

This is leading me to believe that since the heatsink is not evenly pressed against the surface of the CPU, it's causing issues, and it did. Once I booted up, it immediately turned itself off right when I got to my desktop. The readings, just in BIOs, was at 71C. I'm guessing it's because the fastener broke and the heatsink isn't in there properly. Since then, to prevent damage I've not turned on the computer.

Agree/Disagree on my guess here? Suggestions or comments?
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a c 130 U Graphics card
May 28, 2010 8:32:23 AM

Yes you cant run it with a broken fastener, looks like its time for a new heatsink.

Mactronix
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a b U Graphics card
May 28, 2010 9:28:41 AM

Just to assure your theory, start the computer up whilst pushing the heatsink down. If it's a generic heatsink that came with the CPU, push it down with your fingers on the outside portion of the fan's brackets (thick area so that the brackets aren't pushed down that it stops the fan from spinning). You can also push down on the heatsink itself but make sure you let the CPU and heatsink cool down and that you don't have any static in you. Best thing to do is definitely place your fingers on the fan's bracket. Use a decent amount of force, especially towards the region with the broken pin. If the temps drop down dramatically, then yes, the pin is to blame for your temperature issues. If you're worried about attempting this, don't. I'm 98% sure it's due to the broken pin anyway and not improper thermal pasting. Either way, having a broken pin is never good for your heatsink. It's not even safe for temporary use. Replace the heatsink asap.
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a c 130 U Graphics card
May 28, 2010 9:38:16 AM

skolpo said:
Just to assure your theory, start the computer up whilst pushing the heatsink down. If it's a generic heatsink that came with the CPU, push it down with your fingers on the outside portion of the fan's brackets (thick area so that the brackets aren't pushed down that it stops the fan from spinning). You can also push down on the heatsink itself but make sure you let the CPU and heatsink cool down and that you don't have any static in you. Best thing to do is definitely place your fingers on the fan's bracket. Use a decent amount of force, especially towards the region with the broken pin. If the temps drop down dramatically, then yes, the pin is to blame for your temperature issues. If you're worried about attempting this, don't. I'm 98% sure it's due to the broken pin anyway and not improper thermal pasting. Either way, having a broken pin is never good for your heatsink. It's not even safe for temporary use. Replace the heatsink asap.



Do not do this, if you push to hard you could damage something. Its a pointless piece of advice as the pin is broken. End of story.
It is physically impossable to get a decent contact with a broken pin so do yourself a favour and just get a new heatsink.

Mactronix
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a b U Graphics card
May 28, 2010 9:39:41 AM

mactronix said:
Do not do this, if you push to hard you could damage something. Its a pointless piece of advice as the pin is broken. End of story.
It is physically impossable to get a decent contact with a broken pin so do yourself a favour and just get a new heatsink.

Mactronix


You're right. I completely agree. It's something I personally do and some other people I know that does it, but we know what we're doing. Don't do it. It's definitely the pin that's causing the heat issues.
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May 28, 2010 8:17:06 PM

Alright. Thankfully, I haven't done that. Thank you all for your advice. I'm now contacting Micro Center to help me find a new heat sink. Which one would you guys recommend? Money isn't too much of an issue, but as anyone, I would like to save where possible while getting a heat sink that is not considered to be a temporary fix. Currently, I have the E6600 2.4GHZ Core 2 Duo processor, and an ABIT IL9 PRO motherboard. While I am looking, would anyone take the time to suggest a good heat sink that is cost effective?

Thanks,
Ricky
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June 4, 2010 7:50:01 AM

Hi guys,

Just thought I'd post an update. I took it to best buy. They installed my new heatsink. It worked out alright. Also, my computer kept hanging before it booted to Windows. It was the CMOS battery causing that issue, too. My PC is no longer overheated. Thank you for your help, all.
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a c 130 U Graphics card
June 4, 2010 8:33:26 AM

Glad we could help, enjoy you nice working PC.

Mactronix :) 
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