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Old PSU + new mobo

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  • Asus
  • Motherboards
  • Product
Last response: in Motherboards
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April 7, 2011 4:56:02 PM

Hello,

Would like to take the time to introduce myself. My name is Blake and I'm an amateur computer builder who's always been onboard with ASUS, excuse the pun.

Anyways, just bought my AMD Phenom II X6 3.2ghz, the M4A89GTD board and 4gb of some corsair ddr3 1600mhz memory. Upgrading from AMD Anthlon X2 6400, 2gb of ddr2 and the ASUS M2N32 deluxe.

Went to install all my parts, plugged everything in correctly and cannot for the life of me get a display, BIOS, windows, or anything. My monitor light blinks like its a bad GFX connection.

Eliminated the possibility of my card cause I'm using right now on my old mobo. My main concern is that my PSU is about 5 years old, Rosewill 600W. I am wondering, is it possible that my PSU is too old for this mobo. It appears there is an 8-pin power connector right by the CPU, which is why I am curious.


I tried plugging two 4-pins into where the 8 pin should go (right next to the blue Hybrid Technology heatsink or w/e it is)

http://usa.asus.com/websites/Global/products/eCWbkolMf0...

If you look at the top right where I reference, you can see that there is a little black piece that pulls off half the connector revealing a perfect spot for an 8-pin power connector. Here is a list of the more explicit specs so you all know I have actually done my research before I bought a bunch of stuff.

Phenom IIX6 1090T(HDT90ZFBK6DGR),3.2GHz,125W,rev.E0,SocketAM3,6-Core

M4A89GTD PRO/USB3

CORSAIR Vengeance 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 Desktop Memory Model CMZ4GX3M2A1600C9
**Designed with overclockers in mind, Corsair Vengeance DDR3 memory modules use carefully selected RAMs to enable excellent overclocking results on current and future generation Intel and AMD platforms**

ATI Radeon 5770

Any help appreciated.

More about : psu mobo

a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
April 7, 2011 5:32:23 PM

While any PSU will experience 'electrolytic capacitor aging' the 600W should still be able to power the MOBO, but WHAT do you mean by "plugging two 4-pins into where the 8 pin should go" ** You only want to use 4+4-pin ATX12V/EPS12V Connector.

4-Pin ATX12v splitter - $5 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
April 7, 2011 7:39:25 PM

The output type should be labeled. My point is, you cannot use any old 4-pin to power the CPU. Like a PCIe 4-pin =BAD=> CPU 4/4-pin. http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.... If you did I don't know the consequences.

Please provide a link to your correct PSU.
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April 16, 2011 2:47:24 AM

what brand/model is the PSU?
I'm just thinking that if the 4-Pin is daisy chained, or the wrong 4-Pin connector (ie PCIe) that you could be missing the required power needed.
The above splitter/converter is not recommended for use as you might not be supplying enough power to all the proper connections.

Also are you getting any post messages/beeps?
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April 16, 2011 6:59:22 AM

Hey man,just go with Cyber-Freak. :pt1cable: 
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 156 V Motherboard
April 16, 2011 2:25:01 PM

jaquith said:
While any PSU will experience 'electrolytic capacitor aging' the 600W should still be able to power the MOBO, but WHAT do you mean by "plugging two 4-pins into where the 8 pin should go" ** You only want to use 4+4-pin ATX12V/EPS12V Connector.

4-Pin ATX12v splitter - $5 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://images10.newegg.com/NeweggImage/ProductImageCompressAll300/12-201-005-02.jpg

That adapter is a waste of money. Whether the motherboard uses 4 pins or 8, that adapter will not increase the amount of current that the PSU can provide.

The 4 pin CPU power plug will handle the 125 watt TDP of your CPU.

Your concern shouldn't be the age of your PSU. It should be the quality.

So let's start troubleshooting your system.

I have tested the following beep patterns on Gigabyte, eVGA, and ECS motherboards. Other BIOS' may be different, but they all use a single short beep for a successful POST.

Breadboard - that will help isolate any kind of case problem you might have.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU.

Make sure you plug the CPU power cable in. The system will not boot without it.

I always breadboard a new build. It takes only a few minutes, and you know you are putting good parts in the case once you are finished.

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to. You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems. Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU. Remember, at this time, you do not have a graphics card installed so the load on your PSU will be reduced.

If no beeps:
Running fans and drives and motherboard LED's do not necessarily indicate a good PSU. In the absence of a single short beep, they also do not indicate that the system is booting.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU of around 550 - 600 watts. That will power just about any system with a single GPU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

A way that might be easier is to use the main power plug. Working from the back of the plug where the wires come out, use a bare paperclip to short between the green wire and one of the neighboring black wires. That will do the same thing with an installed PSU. It is also an easy way to bypass a questionable case power switch.

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

If the system beeps:
If it looks like the PSU is good, install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card.

Silence, long single beeps, or series of short beeps indicate a problem with the memory. If you get short beeps verify that the memory is in the appropriate motherboard slots.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.
At this point, if the system doesn't work, it's either the video card or an inadequate PSU. Or rarely - the motherboard's PCIe interface.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step. It's possible that you can pass the POST with a defective video card. The POST routines can only check the video interface. It cannot check the internal parts of the video card.

And my thoughts on "capacitor aging":
Comments on capacitor aging:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/300392-10-capacitor...

jaquith, I seem to be in a really contrary mood today. Apologies.
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a c 207 Ĉ ASUS
a c 717 V Motherboard
April 16, 2011 3:09:15 PM

jsc said:
That adapter is a waste of money. Whether the motherboard uses 4 pins or 8, that adapter will not increase the amount of current that the PSU can provide.

The 4 pin CPU power plug will handle the 125 watt TDP of your CPU.

Your concern shouldn't be the age of your PSU. It should be the quality.

It depends on the MOBO, the MOBO's with 'capped' 4 of 8 pins it's a lesser issue. However, the MOBO's with 'open' 8 pins it is and can be a problem to run/activate the phases on the MOBO.

That was the straight from ASUS.
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