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Wireless card

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July 8, 2010 4:22:59 PM

Hi guys, hopefully i can get a bit of advice on this, as i'm unsure what to do.

I currently enjoy using an i7 930 machine (sorted out and finalised in the new build section of this forum)

I am running a Gigabyte X58A-UD3R mobo with a 5850 GPU installed.

My wireless card is an Edimax PCI Wireless N unit

http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/Edimax-EW-7727In-150mbps....

The problem i have is that i want to add another 5850 (come into some money & on the way to owning a bigger res monitor).
The wireless card sits in the only PCI slot on the mobo, which is fine atm, but will be covered by the new GPU i'm adding.
The GPU wont go in the last slot on the board as there is not a dual gap clearance between the slot and the PSU.

My questions are:
1. Is there any way i can buy an adapter or something to get the wireless card into any of the PCIe x1 lanes at the top of board?

2. Or is it not possible and i need to buy a USB wireless adapter (not a fan of them) or buy a PCIe x1 card

Any help would be greatly appreciated#
Cheers

More about : wireless card

a c 84 B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2010 4:49:52 PM

I'm sure an adapter exists, but chances are that it'll be more expensive than either a new card or USB adapter. I'd personally just get a USB adapater since that can easily be moved from computer to computer.
July 8, 2010 5:13:35 PM

^+1 for a usb adapter
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2010 5:36:38 PM

I'd personally get the PCI-e x1 card. I'd think that you'd get a better signal from the antennae that those have. It's also for one particular system anyway.

But that's just out of those 2 options. I'd really go for preferably hardwired or powerline LAN if possible.
July 8, 2010 5:45:23 PM

Yeah, i really prefer internal pci cards, they always seem to deliver really strong signals (and on a purely physics level, long antenna usually mean better/stronger/stable signal), and cant be easily removed from the system, less to break off etc.
The only problem is that pcie x1 adapters seem to cost loads (double the price)

How does the signal strength compare between usb adapters and pci cards?

It also seems a real shame to get rid of my current adapter, which has done a really good job, and isnt very old :( 
July 8, 2010 5:46:55 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:


But that's just out of those 2 options. I'd really go for preferably hardwired or powerline LAN if possible.


Yeah, i really do prefer hardwired, buy my current locations distance to the cable router (downstairs) makes running an ethernet cable really impractical
a b B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2010 7:07:34 PM

Then you should look up the lan over power lines thing I mentioned. If it works on your house wiring, it would definitely be preferred.

http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategor...

I'd also just add that card to a spare parts stockpile instead of tossing it. I've had all sorts of stuff find a new use.
July 9, 2010 12:50:19 PM

Ouch! Those powerline adapters are a bit pricey. I'll stick with the wireless i think(or painstakingly run a long cable upstairs).

My previous question still stands, how do internal pci adapters compare with usb ones in terms of signal stability, speed and strength? Cos i dont mind spending a bit more on a decent adapter.

Would the antenna on something like this
http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/Edimax-EW-7711Uan-Worlds...
make the difference over something like this?
http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/Edimax-EW-7711UMN-150mbp...

Cheers
a b B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2010 4:15:52 PM

I personally have not used those USB ones at all. In fact the only computers using wireless right now are laptops (and that's only because of their location would make any wires more than a little silly) and those are using just the internal wireless.

I know one guy who is using a USB wireless thing, but the router is literally 6 feet away. I have no idea why the crap he isn't using a cable.

There should be benchmarks of some kind somewhere, if not directly one type against another just look for specific real reviews of a few of both kinds.
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2010 4:20:25 PM

I'm using a USB adapter on my laptop (the internal wireless died and it's ancient) and I get good reception pretty much anywhere. I haven't noticed any difference from the internal wireless that it used to have.
July 9, 2010 6:49:21 PM

Cool, so the general consensus is that they're not too bad..
Yeah i wish i could run a cable, but we just had virgin media installed, and they only ran the fibre cable through the wall downstairs, so unfortunately that's where the router is, miles from my bedroom
Any ideas on whether is should pay a touch more for one with a long antenna?
a b B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2010 7:35:55 PM

If it were me I'd go for the internal anyway.

So yeah, I'd also go with the bigger antenna. Just have it plugged into the back, of course, and it shouldn't be too annoying.
July 9, 2010 8:45:22 PM

Cheers for the help guys, i think i'll try and find a cheap internal Pcie x1 card for starters, an then if not, get a large antenna usb one

Very helpful as always!

Thanks
a b B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2010 8:55:05 PM

I have an internal PCI-E adapter for my new build (apartment, heavily trafficked area between router & computer, don't play many fps games), and a USB adapter for a Tivo that's in the same A/V cabinet as the router (no ethernet port...wtf?).

The one thing I would suggest is that if you end up getting a USB adapter, make sure that it supports whatever encryption you use on your wireless network. The USB adapter I have on the Tivo is older and only supports WEP, which is a little annoying (from a security perspective).

As others have said, my impression is that with an internal card with a substantial antenna, you'll get better signal. That may result in increased speed, but probably won't make a huge difference.

The (obvious) upside to a USB adapter is that it's easy to transfer to another device (XBOX, Tivo, whatever) if you end up wiring the computer at a later date.
July 9, 2010 9:24:10 PM

coldsleep said:
I have an internal PCI-E adapter for my new build (apartment, heavily trafficked area between router & computer, don't play many fps games), and a USB adapter for a Tivo that's in the same A/V cabinet as the router (no ethernet port...wtf?).

The one thing I would suggest is that if you end up getting a USB adapter, make sure that it supports whatever encryption you use on your wireless network. The USB adapter I have on the Tivo is older and only supports WEP, which is a little annoying (from a security perspective).

As others have said, my impression is that with an internal card with a substantial antenna, you'll get better signal. That may result in increased speed, but probably won't make a huge difference.

The (obvious) upside to a USB adapter is that it's easy to transfer to another device (XBOX, Tivo, whatever) if you end up wiring the computer at a later date.


Oh yeah, cheers for the heads up on encryption, didn't even cross my mind.

Its not so much speed of the wireless connection i'm worried about, its more the range and stability, I had to upgrade to an 802.11n dual band router, purely because i live in a victorian house, and i swear the walls are lead lined or something, cos the signal really drops off, even when you are not that far away.
Modern houses have it better lol!

Thanks
a b B Homebuilt system
July 10, 2010 12:07:30 AM

You realize of course that that means modern houses are possibly flimsier right? lol.

The implications of that on the house power wiring would probably stop the powerline adapters from working. They can be a bit of a gamble because they depend on the way it's set up. They should have better latency than wireless and at the least have 200 megabits of speed in ideal conditions. Way faster than wireless, which is why I'd do it and then return the stuff if it didn't work.

But I have a line run such that there's plugs in the wall in two places; one in the computer room and one it my room. It has the ethernet running outside the house. But that was originally done in the days of wireless b or lower...

WEP can be popped in a few minutes. You more or less have to be running linux to do it, and be lucky on your own adapter being able to do the commands required. So you definitely want to be using WPA2-AES.
July 10, 2010 2:09:27 PM

False_Dmitry_II said:
You realize of course that that means modern houses are possibly flimsier right? lol.

The implications of that on the house power wiring would probably stop the powerline adapters from working. They can be a bit of a gamble because they depend on the way it's set up. They should have better latency than wireless and at the least have 200 megabits of speed in ideal conditions. Way faster than wireless, which is why I'd do it and then return the stuff if it didn't work.

But I have a line run such that there's plugs in the wall in two places; one in the computer room and one it my room. It has the ethernet running outside the house. But that was originally done in the days of wireless b or lower...

WEP can be popped in a few minutes. You more or less have to be running linux to do it, and be lucky on your own adapter being able to do the commands required. So you definitely want to be using WPA2-AES.


Yeah, i think i did look into the powerline things when i forst moved in, and found that upstairs and downstairs were on two different ring mains,, or something which meant the adapters wouldnt work.

God, i envy your fully wired house, would be sweet to be able to plug a big desktop in anywhere.

Yeah, you gotta be stupid to run a WEP wireless network now, especially seeing as all routers for a long time support wpa2 etc.

Right, looks like i'm gonna try and hunt for a Pcie x1 card, :pfff: 
!