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Windows OS Unable to Find Drivers/HDD (Serious Pro. Help Wanted!)

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September 8, 2012 3:55:04 AM

Hey Everyone,

I recently built a computer for a friend and after setting the entire thing up I went about installing the OS only to encounter a problem. This computer is freshly built with NOTHING installed on it currently. Thus when I went about doing a fresh "custom" install I had problems. It said It was unable to find the drivers, although it IS listed in my bios menu as being connected.

Some things to note:
1. The drivers do appear when I go in and select them in the browse feature, BUT they only show if I uncheck the box that says "hide all incompatable drivers" (It's close to that wording)
2. Bios picks it up, but not OS.
3. Motherboard: Here.
4. HDD: HDD here.
5. After googling I found some people reporting this error has to do with a bad DVD install disc. After my friend's disc didn't work I attempted to use my dad's install disc. Nothing changed between the discs.
6. I didn't attempt to boot from a USB because I didn't have time tonight.
7. The motherboard instructions said to install the OS first before the drivers. (I tried to put in the mobo disc but it just brings up some xpressrecover menu, and not an install driver menu)
8. The Existing Guide says this: "But your OS does not see it. You do have an already running OS, don't you? If not, well, I haven't written that part yet." So I posted my own topic! So don't think I didn't do some peaking around.
9. Full System Specs:


Any Help?
a b G Storage
September 8, 2012 4:07:52 AM

you do not need drivers for a standard HDD, the driver selection during OS load is for RAID drivers, meaning it would be to load a driver for a RAID card in order to see your HDDs on the other end.

Reset the BIOS, make sure that your HDDs are set up in AHCI or IDE mode, try again.

While you should not have to, you may want to put the drive into another system to give it a partition and format it. You will want to do it again during the windows setup, but sometimes the drive is not clean, and needs something done to it for Windows to really see it.
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September 8, 2012 5:37:47 PM

CaedenV said:
you do not need drivers for a standard HDD, the driver selection during OS load is for RAID drivers, meaning it would be to load a driver for a RAID card in order to see your HDDs on the other end.

Reset the BIOS, make sure that your HDDs are set up in AHCI or IDE mode, try again.

While you should not have to, you may want to put the drive into another system to give it a partition and format it. You will want to do it again during the windows setup, but sometimes the drive is not clean, and needs something done to it for Windows to really see it.

Ok...

1. I attempted to change the bios settings to both AHCI and IDE and neither worked (AHCI was default I believe).
2. I put the harddrive into my own computer and did the following:
--Attempted to install windows 7 on it on that working computer. The same thing occurred. This leads me to believe one of two things. Either hardrive is bad or windows 7 install will simply not recognize it.
--After that I kept it on MY computer not the new one. I was able to access the drives and put files onto them from inside my own booted computer. From there after I established it was able to store things I formatted the drive and partitioned it.
-----After doing all of that the Partitoned sections DID SHOW UP in the windows 7 install disc's device menu.
---------Now I installed this on my computer because it actually showed up. So my goal was to just install the windows 7 onto the harddrive and then transfer the harddrive to the new computer. After doing this; however, NO BOOT would work. I put it in the new computer and ended up getting a black screen with a random garble of numbers/symbols after the bios screen.

Does anyone know what in the world is going on?
As I see it the drive is operational because I can access it when on a system with windows 7 already installed. And the bios on the new system does register it....
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a b G Storage
September 9, 2012 12:05:48 AM

a windows install is tied in some ways to the motherboard (specifically the north-bridge chipset). You cannot simply install Windows, move the drive to another box, and then expect it to work unless it is a very similar bit of hardware.

However, now that we have the drive paritioned and happy, try installing windows on the current machine and see if it will work for you now.

If this does not work, try running the install via a flash drive. You will need a free tool called "Windows 7 USB DVD Download Tool" which will copy your install image from the DVD to a USB drive, which will be boot able in the new system. This would prevent any DVD read errors that may be happening due to a faulty DVD drive.

However, now that the HDD is initialized my bet is that it will behave nice for you.
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September 17, 2012 8:39:26 PM

Best answer selected by ElysianWhip.
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