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Dropped HDD, but still worked. Having problems now...

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September 11, 2012 2:11:57 AM

So, while making my first build, I had some trouble with getting my HDD into the Case because of some crappy brackets. I dropped the HDD maybe 2-3 times on its back, corner, etc. Anyway, It still worked.

A week later, being last night, The computer all of a sudden starts taking forever booting into Windows, and after assuming it was a registry issue or a virus, I wiped the HDD clean and tried re-installing windows. After the install, I got a quick, .25 second flash of a BSOD and now my HDD isn't recognized by my computer. PERIOD. Not in BIOS, not anywhere.

Now, is this a problem with a sata port or did dropping it finally take its toll?

I'm only asking this now because Even after falling 3 times, it still worked so I didn't think it could progressively get worse and stop working over time after dropping it. If that's the case, please tell me because I can still send it in to amazon to get it replaced.

Also, it's a WD 500gb 7200 RPM HDD.
a b G Storage
September 11, 2012 3:12:39 AM

You could try connecting it to a different computer to see if it's detected there.

But if it's not your best option is to return it for a replacement.

When a drive is dropped unpredictable things can happen and I would not trust it.
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a b G Storage
September 11, 2012 4:14:15 AM

Yeah, easy fix is to report the drive as DOA and return it for a replacement.

Don't feel bad about doing that - dropping it may have had nothing to do with its failure. Computer equipment typically has a bathtub failure curve, with most of the failures happening during the first few days or weeks of use. It's unrealistic for a manufacturer to test every drive for weeks to weed these out.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathtub_curve

So manufacturers just ship all the drives they make, and RMA the 1% or so which suffer infant mortality in the hands of users. It's cheaper that way. (System builders like Dell and HP run their systems through a few days of burn-in to help weed these out. That's part of what you're paying for when you buy from them.)

If you're dying of curiosity as to what failed, you can grab a utility which will read the SMART data. The drive writes any unusual or out-of-spec events to the SMART flash memory, so you can see if it's suffered from overheating, excess sector failures, whatever. But you said it's not even showing up in the BIOS so it's probably dead beyond this point.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.M.A.R.T.
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