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PCMCIA USB 2.0 Speed?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 6, 2004 4:19:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Since just about the time I got this laptop, I just don't use my desktop,
except for its USB 2.0 card (my laptop has USB 1.1). That change in my
desktop from USB 1.1 to 2.0, decreased DVD burning (USB external DVD drive)
from 90 minutes to 14 minutes. I see that I can get the D-Link 2 port USB
2.0 PCMCIA delivered for $39, but can I expect the same speed improvement
on my laptop with this?

If so, I could pass my desktop on to another family member.

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm

More about : pcmcia usb speed

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 6, 2004 5:07:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Tom McCune wrote:

> Since just about the time I got this laptop, I just don't use my desktop,
> except for its USB 2.0 card (my laptop has USB 1.1). That change in my
> desktop from USB 1.1 to 2.0, decreased DVD burning (USB external DVD drive)
> from 90 minutes to 14 minutes. I see that I can get the D-Link 2 port USB
> 2.0 PCMCIA delivered for $39, but can I expect the same speed improvement
> on my laptop with this?

Sure. The interface you'll be using (32-bit Cardbus) is very similar to
PCI (as in your desktop) - and the bandwidth is very similar.

But one thing you need to watch out for a bit is powering arrangements.
If you want to use any bus-powered devices _at all_ (and that includes
silly things like mice) - you have to get 5V DC _into_ the adapter.
Thats means a AC adapter (which is not helpful when you're on the move
running the laptop on battery) or a PS/2 or USB power-pass-thru cable
(which is fiddly, and may not supply enough for some devices like
external HD's.
But not a problem really if your laptop just lives indoors as a
space-saving measure.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 6, 2004 5:56:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Martin Slaney <slaz@dsl.NIET_SPAMpipex.com> wrote in news:c7udnWC5y-
wMRxHcRVnygg@pipex.net:

> Sure. The interface you'll be using (32-bit Cardbus) is very similar to
> PCI (as in your desktop) - and the bandwidth is very similar.
>
> But one thing you need to watch out for a bit is powering arrangements.
> If you want to use any bus-powered devices _at all_ (and that includes
> silly things like mice) - you have to get 5V DC _into_ the adapter.
> Thats means a AC adapter (which is not helpful when you're on the move
> running the laptop on battery) or a PS/2 or USB power-pass-thru cable
> (which is fiddly, and may not supply enough for some devices like
> external HD's.
> But not a problem really if your laptop just lives indoors as a
> space-saving measure.

Thank you very much for the helpful reply. The only USB devices I use that
do not have their own power supply are USB flash drives. Since one of them
has a capacity of 1GB and does support USB 2.0, that should show some good
improvement in speed also.

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
Related resources
November 6, 2004 7:14:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Martin Slaney <slaz@dsl.niet_spampipex.com> wrote:
: But one thing you need to watch out for a bit is powering arrangements.
: If you want to use any bus-powered devices _at all_ (and that includes
: silly things like mice) - you have to get 5V DC _into_ the adapter.

I have the D-link USB 2.0 PC Card adaptor, and it does not even have
the ability to be powered with an adaptor. However, thusfar this has
not been a problem for any device I have tried. I have used mice and CF
card readers (all powered from the USB port) without any problem as
well as self-powered devices like DVD burners and external hard
drives. I'm guessing the only problem would be devices that draw
significant power from the USB port.

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 6, 2004 9:36:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com (Andrew) wrote in
news:crkrfyrkr28564645662209@bizaveMYSHOES.com:

> I have the D-link USB 2.0 PC Card adaptor, and it does not even have
> the ability to be powered with an adaptor. However, thusfar this has
> not been a problem for any device I have tried. I have used mice and CF
> card readers (all powered from the USB port) without any problem as
> well as self-powered devices like DVD burners and external hard
> drives. I'm guessing the only problem would be devices that draw
> significant power from the USB port.

Thanks Andrew.

I just tested DVD ripping speed of my desktop and laptop internal DVD ROM
drives. Unfortunately, the laptop only has about 70% of the desktop's
ripping speed, so I need to think further on this. I'm not sure what is
the most important factor in the slower ripping: 5400rpm laptop hard drive
vs. 7200rpm desktop hard drive; the DVD ROMs themselves; or since a high
level of compression was used, whether the desktop P4 at 1.7ghz vs. the
laptop P4M at 2.0ghz. On one DVD, the laptop was 4 minutes slower, and 15
minutes slower on another.

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 6, 2004 9:36:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Tom McCune wrote:
> usenetMYSHOES@bizaveMYSHOES.com (Andrew) wrote in
> news:crkrfyrkr28564645662209@bizaveMYSHOES.com:
>
>> I have the D-link USB 2.0 PC Card adaptor, and it does not even have
>> the ability to be powered with an adaptor. However, thusfar this has
>> not been a problem for any device I have tried. I have used mice
>> and CF card readers (all powered from the USB port) without any
>> problem as well as self-powered devices like DVD burners and
>> external hard
>> drives. I'm guessing the only problem would be devices that draw
>> significant power from the USB port.
>
> Thanks Andrew.
>
> I just tested DVD ripping speed of my desktop and laptop internal DVD
> ROM drives. Unfortunately, the laptop only has about 70% of the
> desktop's ripping speed, so I need to think further on this. I'm not
> sure what is the most important factor in the slower ripping: 5400rpm
> laptop hard drive vs. 7200rpm desktop hard drive; the DVD ROMs
> themselves; or since a high level of compression was used, whether
> the desktop P4 at 1.7ghz vs. the laptop P4M at 2.0ghz. On one DVD,
> the laptop was 4 minutes slower, and 15 minutes slower on another.

IMO, that type of desktop/laptop performance is rather typical.
Desktops have all the bells and whistles in RAM, memory bus, PCI bus,
mainboard design, disk performance/cacheing, etc., and when each little
bit gets added, laptops do "just about as well" as desktops. I would be
concerned if the ratio were 25%, but 70% is in the lower ballpark of
"equivalent" performance. There are also a rather large performance
differences among different OEM DVD implementations at the same
advertised speed with some well-known brands trailing the pack.
www.anandtech.com has a good review of dual-layer drives that
illustrates just how irrelevant advertised read/write speed can be.

Q
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 7, 2004 1:15:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in news:ILqdnZBI4ocYtRDcRVn-
ow@comcast.com:

> IMO, that type of desktop/laptop performance is rather typical.
> Desktops have all the bells and whistles in RAM, memory bus, PCI bus,
> mainboard design, disk performance/cacheing, etc., and when each little
> bit gets added, laptops do "just about as well" as desktops. I would be
> concerned if the ratio were 25%, but 70% is in the lower ballpark of
> "equivalent" performance. There are also a rather large performance
> differences among different OEM DVD implementations at the same
> advertised speed with some well-known brands trailing the pack.
> www.anandtech.com has a good review of dual-layer drives that
> illustrates just how irrelevant advertised read/write speed can be.

Thanks Q,

I really love the portability of my laptop, but also love power and speed.
My comparisons above were both for current usage, and with thinking toward
future purchase. Probably the greatest benefit of a laptop for me, is that
it is a lot gentler on my ears.

--
Tom McCune
My PGP Page & FAQ: http://www.McCune.cc/PGP.htm
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 7, 2004 1:29:07 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Andrew wrote:
> Martin Slaney <slaz@dsl.niet_spampipex.com> wrote:
> : But one thing you need to watch out for a bit is powering arrangements.
> : If you want to use any bus-powered devices _at all_ (and that includes
> : silly things like mice) - you have to get 5V DC _into_ the adapter.
>
> I have the D-link USB 2.0 PC Card adaptor, and it does not even have
> the ability to be powered with an adaptor. However, thusfar this has
> not been a problem for any device I have tried. I have used mice and CF
> card readers (all powered from the USB port) without any problem as
> well as self-powered devices like DVD burners and external hard
> drives. I'm guessing the only problem would be devices that draw
> significant power from the USB port.

Really ? I must be out of date then. AFAIK - for the adapter to be able
to supply _any_ 5V at all, it must be getting 5V from the PCMCIA
connector (obviously 5V is present on that connector for 16-bit 5V PC
cards) - but that would, strictly speaking, break the Cardbus spec I
think. But certainly it seems sensible where a just a few mA is reqd.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 7, 2004 3:57:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Martin Slaney <slaz@dsl.NIET_SPAMpipex.com> wrote:
>
> Really ? I must be out of date then. AFAIK - for the adapter to be
> able
> to supply _any_ 5V at all, it must be getting 5V from the PCMCIA
> connector (obviously 5V is present on that connector for 16-bit 5V PC
> cards) - but that would, strictly speaking, break the Cardbus spec I
> think. But certainly it seems sensible where a just a few mA is reqd.

Don't forget that Cardbus slots are backwards compatible with PCMCIA 16BIT
cards and have the provision for supplying 5V.

--
Regards,

James

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