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July 13, 2010 7:10:38 PM

I'm looking to build a computer, but I need some input from more knowledgeable computer experts.

APPROX PURCHASE DATE: Two weeks

SYSTEM USAGE: Video, photos, and internet multiplayer games

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Monitor keyboard

PREFERED WEBSITE FOR PARTS: New Egg Microcenter

PART PREFERENCES: Full Tower

OVERCLOCKING: No, Maybe Crossfire

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1920X1200


Below is a list of parts I have chosen for the computer I would like to build. I would appreciate any comments or suggestions. Thanks in advance


TOWER: Cooler Master HAF 932 or Antec 1200

PROCESSOR: Intel I-7 930 1366 socket

MOTHERBOARD: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R? or an Asus

PSU Corsair CMPSU-850HX

MEMORY: Mushkin Redline 6GB (3x2gb) DDR3-1600 (PC3-12800) #998805

HARDDRIVE: Samsung Spinpoint F-3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200rpm sata 3.0GB

GPU: XFX-HD5870-ZNFC Radeon 1GB 256Bit DDR5

OPERATING SYSTEM: Windows 7 Pro 64bit

DVD/BURNER open?

COOLER: Noctua NH-C12P?

COOLER BRACKET?



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Best solution

July 13, 2010 7:17:15 PM

Drop the case to the HAF 922. It's a lot cheaper and basically the same size. It also has a lot of really good features like dust filters.

Go with the Gigabyte board.

Instead of the Mushikin sticks (I'm assuming they're the CAS Latency 6 ones), grab some G.Skill Trident 3x2 GB 2000 mhz CAS Latency 9. Once you set them to run at 1600 mhz, they'll be faster.

For the optical drive, get the cheapest SATA burner out there.

Everythign else looks great.
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July 13, 2010 7:51:18 PM

Yes the Mushkin is cas Latency 6, timing 6-8-6-24. I have no idea how to set the G skill to 1600. I was just hoping to install the Mushkin without making any settings.

I will look at the Haf 922. Will everything fit comfortably inside?

Thanks
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July 13, 2010 8:21:27 PM

You'd need to set everything in the BIOS anyway. The motherboard's manual will give you details.

Yes. The 922 is actually larger than the Antec 1200. It may be classified as a mid tower, but it's really the size of a full tower.
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July 13, 2010 8:42:32 PM

I also see another motherboard that maybe better than the one I listed. What do you think of an Asus P6X58D premium LGA 1366 Intel X58 Sata 6gb/s usb 3.0 ATX Intel?
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July 13, 2010 8:48:28 PM

I'm getting really tired of correcting this lowrider. I hope you actually read the posts instead of blinding spamming the card that was just reviewed...

The 460 is a not a good choice. It performs like the 5830, which isn't in a good spot. It's too expensive and underpowered. The 5870 absolutely blows away the 460 (and the 465 and the 470 and sometimes the 480). As for the Intel/nVidia thing, it's a misconception caused from the very old days where all computers were using Intel chips and ATI had driver issues. These issues (long gone I might add) were incorrectly linked to one another.

The Asus Premium is overpriced. Stick with the Gigabyte.
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July 13, 2010 8:56:50 PM

Mad Admiral thanks for the response. I read his post, and I was totally confused. I'm glad you responded because I thought I was nuts.

I understand the Asus is more money, but it seems to have less issues than the Gigabite. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I maybe placing to much emphasis on the reviews that I have read.
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July 13, 2010 8:59:10 PM

You are placing too much emphasis on the reviews. Tom's did a comparision a while back with both the Gigabyte, Asus Premium and a cheaper Asus (and some others) and gave the Gigabyte their recommended buy. I can't justify spending more to get any other board.
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July 13, 2010 8:59:15 PM

^+1 The 460 is a very good GPU but isn't a contender for the 5870.

Another option is the P6X58D-E with very similar features that the P6X58D Premium but with fewer price.

@MadAdmiral: Can u send me the other threads with the same info that ur reported?
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July 13, 2010 9:04:04 PM

Mike 06, can you name an exact budget on your build?
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July 13, 2010 9:09:59 PM

@saint: Sent them to you in a PM. I may have exaggarated on the number...
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July 13, 2010 9:20:11 PM

Blackhawk $1,800.00 to $2,000.00 US
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July 13, 2010 9:41:42 PM

Okayer for $2,000 here is what i'd get:

CPU: i7 930
GPU: GTX 480
PSU: 850TX
Case: HAF 942
MB: GIgabyte UD5
Ram: OCZ platinum 6GB Tripled
ODD: whichever you want
OS: windows 7 most likley...? Should fit your budget!
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July 13, 2010 9:47:33 PM

Stick with the advice I listed above, but drop in the HD 5970 instead of the 5870. That would blow away the GTX 480.

Some things to point out about blackhawk's build above: 1.) There is no such thing as the HAF 942. The 922 would be ideal.

2.) The UD5 is a waste of money. Stick with the UD3R.

3.) OCZ RAM has compatibility issues with many boards. This is especially true with Intel builds. I'd avoid it at all costs.
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July 13, 2010 10:01:37 PM

^+1

Be sure that the UD3R is the Rev. 2 or u can have problems with USB 3.0 and Crossfire or SLI in the future.
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July 13, 2010 10:12:21 PM

MadAdmiral said:
Stick with the advice I listed above, but drop in the HD 5970 instead of the 5870. That would blow away the GTX 480.

Some things to point out about blackhawk's build above: 1.) There is no such thing as the HAF 942. The 922 would be ideal.

2.) The UD5 is a waste of money. Stick with the UD3R.

3.) OCZ RAM has compatibility issues with many boards. This is especially true with Intel builds. I'd avoid it at all costs.


oh so cooler master made a case and named it the haf 942 in my dream...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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July 13, 2010 10:42:00 PM

^ :lol: 

That's better know as the CM HAF X :lol: 
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July 13, 2010 10:54:59 PM

Oh I see. Its just that with the HAF 932, the series is named 932. However the model is RC-932-KKN1-GP, with the HAF 942...the series is called HAF X while the specific model is known as the RC-942-KKN1. Madadmiral, you can look for yourself on cm website and newegg. Moreover in the search bar when you type haf 942, the haf x comes up.
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July 13, 2010 11:23:37 PM

Thank you for all responses.

Saint that is good advice for that mother board. I will have to call New Egg and see if they can verify.
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July 13, 2010 11:28:12 PM

Mad Admiral I really hate to spend that much extra for the 5970.

How does the 5870 rate compared to the 480?
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July 13, 2010 11:31:05 PM

The 480 is between the 5870 and 5970 but bear in mind that the 5870 use less power and produces less heat.
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July 14, 2010 12:03:39 AM

The 5970 is technically two 5870s in Crossfire. So you're really paying $700 for $800 worth of graphics muscle.

Most people tend to think that the 480 isn't worth it. It's just barely better performing than the 5870, yet costs 25% more. That and the excess heat and massive power needs make it undesireable.

My bad on the HAF 942. I only knew it as the HAF X. The other HAFs are known for the model number, while that one isn't. Regardless, there is absolutely no reason to pay $200 for a case. I can think of five off the top of my head that are as good or better than that for less (HAF 922, Antec 902, Antec 1200, HAF 932, Coolermaster Cosmos).
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July 14, 2010 11:33:28 AM

Doing a little more research I would like to know if I can drop down to a Corsair CMPSU 750HX from the 850HX while running a 5970?

It is a minor savings initially on the purchase of the PSU, but possibly a better savings with the electric bills over the next few years.
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July 14, 2010 12:23:07 PM

You can drop to the 750W, but only if you don't want to Crossfire later. You could actually drop to a 650W.

I will point out that computing power usage from the wall and power usage for the build are slightly different. Each PSU operates at different efficiencies. To get how much power you'll actually need to draw from the wall (how much you pay for), you need to take the total wattage use of the build and divide by the efficiency of the PSU. 80+ Certified units are tested to meet certain efficiency standards. Generally, the larger the PSU, the higher the efficiency. Larger, more efficient PSUs can sometimes use the same amount of power from the wall as smaller ones, yet actually provide more power to the build.

Also, PSUs are most efficient when they're at 50% of max load. That means if you buy too big of a unit, you pay more for the power. If you buy too small, you also pay more for the power.
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July 14, 2010 4:57:02 PM

Thank you Mad Admiral.
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July 14, 2010 4:57:48 PM

Best answer selected by mike 06.
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