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Newbie seeking Raid 0 Help!

Tags:
  • NAS / RAID
  • Hard Drives
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
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September 14, 2012 1:28:41 PM

Hi ive got a custom gaming rig and i was wondering now that my 300gb hdd is close to being full should i buy 1 2tb hdd or 2 1 tb hdd's? Im also curious if my mobo can use raid 0 since i cant seem to find it in my user guide, its a Asus P8Z77-M. Ive also read that the samsung spinpoint f3 is the best hdd i can buy so any opinions on that would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :) 

More about : newbie seeking raid

September 14, 2012 1:52:57 PM

Thanks that helped with the Raid 0 question!
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a c 99 G Storage
September 14, 2012 1:57:57 PM

1 2tb or 2 1tb with raid0, raid 0 will be faster, but if one of the drive fail all data will be lost. So if you go that route, remember to backup.
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September 14, 2012 1:59:11 PM

rgd1101 said:
1 2tb or 2 1tb with raid0, raid 0 will be faster, but if one of the drive fail all data will be lost. So if you go that route, remember to backup.


So what do you suggest?
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a c 99 G Storage
September 14, 2012 2:19:23 PM

It your call. Do you want more performance or a safer route. Although either way, you should always backup important data.
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a b G Storage
September 14, 2012 2:20:16 PM

bigguytom1031 said:
So what do you suggest?



If you are looking for speed, get 2x1TB and RAID0, if you are looking for fault tolerance, then 2x2TB in RAID1 (mirroring) this way if one drive fails, the second drive in the array will be accessible. However some systems will format all data once the failed drive has been replaced, so in essence you should still have a backup to any array regardless.

The misconception that people have is that having a RAID system is for backup purposes but it is not.

RAID is short for redundant array of independent (or inexpensive) disks.
It is a category of disk drives that employ two or more drives in combination for fault tolerance and performance.
A good practice is to have a backup to a RAID system.

I have 2x1TB drives as RAID0 within a RAID enclosure, but all the data on the RAID0 is backed up to 2 external 2TB drives, that is how much my data is of value to me.


Hope this helps.
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September 14, 2012 2:27:58 PM

no one has mentioned this but you need to make sure that you have either windows professional or ultimate to run a raid 0 array, windows home will only run raid 1 and JBOD.

I have a raid 0 data drive on my computer and only keep things that are backed up against a cloud or that i have a disk for (aka my steam library and things like that)

just some things to keep in mind
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September 14, 2012 2:28:31 PM

Thanks guys also what would be a good program for cloning my current disk?
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a b G Storage
September 14, 2012 3:44:23 PM

Elmo is right, but to few people know what fault tolerance means.

I suggest neither. Get a nice fast SSD for speed, and a large 2TB for room. Best of everything and no RAID drivers to get hosed.
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a b G Storage
September 19, 2012 3:43:11 PM

I also vote for a speedy SSD and/or a single 2TB HDD.

I am glad that ELMO is out busting the myth that RAID is a backup solution!

Another RAID myth is that RAID 0 will speed up everything you do...

RAID or no RAID you are still limited by the access times of the HDD (which have always been slow), small files see very little advantages from RAID 0. You start seeing speed advantage for large files (movies, photo editing and video editing). So if you are expecting RAID 0 to decrease your boot times or speed up checking your email or playing games, you may want to rethink your reasons for doing a RAID.
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