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SSD to HDD clone will not boot

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September 14, 2012 5:02:58 PM

My old computer used 64-bit Windows 7 Home and had an internal HDD that was cloned to an external USB HDD using Casper 6.0. The external USB HDD booted.

My new computer used 64-bit Win 7 Professional and has an over-provisioned internal 512 GB Samsung 830 Series SSD that was cloned to that same external USB HDD using that same Casper 6.0. Now, the external USB HDD will not boot.

I'm guessing that there is some issue with the SSD to HDD clone as there was no issue with my old HDD to HDD clone.

What's wrong and how do I resolve it?

More about : ssd hdd clone boot

a c 81 G Storage
September 15, 2012 7:46:41 PM

Check your bios settings if booting from usb is allowed there. And check if the bootloader was included in the cloning.
September 15, 2012 11:02:53 PM

Thanks, noidea, for your reply.

I don't know where to look for the bootloader but I did a search on the SSD to try and find it there first but I couldn't. Where is the bootloader?

This is an Asus board P9X79 WS. It doesn't say anywhere that I can find in the BIOS specifically that USB booting is allowed. What I do is unplug the internal SSD and have nothing in the DVD player. So there is nothing else to assist the boot process except the external USB HDD. It automatically sees and tries to boot from the external USB HDD or I can go into the BIOS and select the USB HDD as a boot option.

Then it starts to boot normally. It shows "Starting Windows" and the colored balls or whatever they are in the middle of the screen are juggling. But that's as far as it goes. A blue screen with a lot of white print flashes for about a quarter of a second, too quick to even read one word, then it reboots and repeats this cycle over and over until I manually turn off the machine.
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September 15, 2012 11:46:25 PM

Are you trying to run a clone copy of windows from one computer on another?
September 16, 2012 8:53:38 AM

Vukodlak said:
Are you trying to run a clone copy of windows from one computer on another?

No. I am running one SSD computer and it has its own cloning to one external USB HDD.
a c 81 G Storage
September 16, 2012 9:26:58 AM

The bootloader is a smal partition at the beginning of the disk. you can see that in disk management in control panel. Anyway, this seems to work, because it boots from your external disk. Next step: right click on the computer symbol on your desktop, got to properties / extended properties in the left menu and selct the extended tab there (hop this is the right way, caus i'm on a german windows :)  ) On this tab you can de-select the automatic restart after system error. Clone the disk again an try to boot. The blue screen should stay now, so you can tell us the error code or google it yourself.
September 16, 2012 11:56:23 AM

noidea_77 said:
The bootloader is a smal partition at the beginning of the disk. you can see that in disk management in control panel. Anyway, this seems to work, because it boots from your external disk. Next step: right click on the computer symbol on your desktop, got to properties / extended properties in the left menu and selct the extended tab there (hop this is the right way, caus i'm on a german windows :)  ) On this tab you can de-select the automatic restart after system error. Clone the disk again an try to boot. The blue screen should stay now, so you can tell us the error code or google it yourself.

Thanks again, noidea, I am now able to read the blue screen. Below is verbatim from that screen.
---

A problem has been detected and Windows has been shut down to prevent damage to your computer.

If this is the first time you've seen this Stop error screen, restart your computer. If this screen appears again, follow these steps:

Check for viruses on your computer. Remove any newly installed hard drives or hard drive controllers. Check your hard drive to make sure it is properly configured and terminated. Run CHKDSK /F to check for hard drive corruption, and then restart your computer.

Technical information:

*** STOP: 0x0000007B (0XFFFFF880009A97E8, 0xFFFFFFFFC0000034, 0x0000000000000000, 0x0000000000000000)
a c 81 G Storage
September 16, 2012 1:02:01 PM

STOP: 0x0000007B means there is a problem with the HDD. Microsoft has a number of reasons for that, but I would start with an error check on the drive. Right click on the drive in explorer, goto properties / tools and run the error checking. If that doesn't help: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324103
September 17, 2012 8:13:10 AM

noidea_77 said:
STOP: 0x0000007B means there is a problem with the HDD. Microsoft has a number of reasons for that, but I would start with an error check on the drive. Right click on the drive in explorer, goto properties / tools and run the error checking. If that doesn't help: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324103

The external USB HDD is a fully enclosed and sealed 500 GB Transcend StoreJet 25 M that I purchased several years ago. Although the Users' Manual that came with this HDD doesn't say this, the revised manual for their current StoreJet 25 drives that I found online says:

Q. I installed an OS onto the StoreJet 25. Why can’t I boot from it?
A. Current USB 3.0 host devices do not support operating system boot up.

I don't know what to make of this. My old computer, where this setup worked perfectly, had only USB 2. This new machine has both USB 2 and USB 3, but I have the HDD plugged into a USB 2 port, so it shouldn't matter?

With the error checking I selected both 'Automatically fix file system errors' and 'Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors.' This took a long time to run. The results are below:
---

[Window Title]
Checking Disk Local Disk (E)

[Main Instruction]
Some problems were found and fixed

[Content]
Any files that were affected by these problems were moved to a folder named "Found" on the device or disk. Your device or disk is now ready to use.

If you removed the device or disk before all files were fully written to it, parts of some files might still be missing. If so, go back to the source and recopy those files to your device or disk.

[^] Hide details [Close]

[Expanded Information]

CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 5)...
219136 file records processed.
File verification completed.
227 large file records processed.
0 bad file records processed.
4 EA records processed.
120 reparse records processed.
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 5)...
304902 index entries processed.
Index verification completed.


CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 5)...
219136 file SDs/SIDs processed.
Security descriptor verification completed.
42884 data files processed.
CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
37522736 USN bytes processed.
Usn Journal verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying file data (stage 4 of 5)...
219120 files processed.
File data verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying free space (stage 5 of 5)...
55917213 free clusters processed.
Free space verification is complete.
CHKDSK discovered free space marked as allocated in the
master file table (MFT) bitmap.
CHKDSK discovered free space marked as allocated in the volume bitmap.
Windows has made corrections to the file system.

450091007 KB total disk space.
225980012 KB in 167016 files.
105740 KB in 42885 indexes.
336399 KB in use by the system.
65536 KB occupied by the log file.
223668856 KB available on disk.

4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
112522751 total allocation units on disk.
55917214 allocation units available on disk.

---
Well, there was no "Found" folder, however the statement that "Some problems were found and fixed" made me hopeful. But no, it didn't happen. I immediately tried booting from the external USB HDD and I got the exact same error message. I cloned again and I'm getting the exact same error message. Microsoft's support site ultimately leads to a grand array of correction possibilities, none of which seems germane.

All this leads me to believe that there is something simple and direct that will solve this problem or at least explain it. Again, this setup works perfectly HDD to HDD but not SSD to HDD. All components otherwise work well. There is some straightforward issue with SSD to a bootable USB HDD cloning that I am missing.
a c 104 G Storage
September 18, 2012 4:18:48 AM

Hi there,

Could you boot up with the internal SSD, then with the USB connected, look in Disk Management, and see if the MSR partition is present (with no Drive letter, but labelled as Active, System, Healthy Partition, and the OS partition has a Drive Letter, is listed as (Boot, CrashDump, PageFile, Healthy Partition)

Also, if this is for a full backup of your system drive, have you considered just using the Win-7 Backup and Restore feature, where it will make an Image (not a clone) of all the partitions of your system, then incrementally back up changed files to an external drive. Then if you have a disaster, you can just restore it back and you are up to date, not just to the date of doing a clone.
September 18, 2012 11:42:23 AM

John_VanKirk said:
Hi there,

Could you boot up with the internal SSD, then with the USB connected, look in Disk Management, and see if the MSR partition is present (with no Drive letter, but labelled as Active, System, Healthy Partition, and the OS partition has a Drive Letter, is listed as (Boot, CrashDump, PageFile, Healthy Partition)

Also, if this is for a full backup of your system drive, have you considered just using the Win-7 Backup and Restore feature, where it will make an Image (not a clone) of all the partitions of your system, then incrementally back up changed files to an external drive. Then if you have a disaster, you can just restore it back and you are up to date, not just to the date of doing a clone.

The following is from Disk Management:

The internal SSD:

Disk 0, Basic, 476.94 GB, Online

System Reserved, 100 MB NTFS, Healthy (System, Active, Primary Partition)

(C), 429.24 GB NTFS, Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)

47.60 GB Unallocated

The external USB HDD with the clone of C:

Disk 1, Basic, 465.76 GB, Online

System Reserved, 100 MB NTFS, Healthy (Active, Primary Partition)

(E), 429.24 GB NTFS, Healthy (Primary Partition)

36.42 GB Unallocated

I've considered alternative backup solutions. But the setup I've had for years, and the goal should an SSD disaster strike, is to have a quick and complete plug-and-play option without any immediate time-consuming restoration procedures (albeit without my most recent work).

I have a trouble ticket in with Casper; we'll see what they say.

Thanks for your efforts John; they are appreciated.
a c 104 G Storage
September 18, 2012 4:59:33 PM

The external USB clone is the same size as the original, but a couple flags are not set.

System Reserved, 100 MB NTFS, Healthy (Active, Primary Partition) --- (Not set as system, normally indicating boot manager files not present)

(E), 429.24 GB NTFS, Healthy (Primary Partition) --- (Not set as boot, crashdump, or page file)

Try setting the Volume Letter to C: on this drive instead of what the OS picked as E: It may be looking for the C drive to boot from. If it doesn't work you can change it back. You should have the internal C: drive disconnected for safety, since you will have 2 C: drives.

Other thing to try is set the legacy USB setting in the BIOS to enabled. It may be the USB ports get temporarily disabled as control switches from the BIOS to the OS, and since you are trying to boot from this USB connection, the OS gets disconnected.

I would guess, if your main C drive failed, and you "cloned" this copy back to a new primary drive, it would work OK. The way it's set up, you can't take the SATA drive out of the USB case and just connect it internally as the primary drive. People who assemble their own USB connected external SATA drives can easily open the case, and place the HDD on an internal SATA port.

Having a "cloned" drive as backup drive is not the best solution. You would have to be cloning it frequently, or you won't have the recent files you most likely were working on and were the important ones. And you have to replace the failed drive in the system anyway.

The backUp and restore image + incrimental backup gives you up to date files. Can be an external HDD.
Another option is to use a mirrored RAID 1 disk where data is simultaneoously stored and synched on two HDD's. Drives have to be the same and the system set up as RAID. Win-8 has this offered as a "storage solution" for backup redundancy. MS obviously realizes the problems in having functional backups available "when" your primary HDD fails.
a b G Storage
September 20, 2012 6:18:46 AM

Did you still have you original system bootable, if that you could re-transfer your system to the SSD, by clone disk or directly migrate OS to SSD with Partition Assistant, these two feature will clone your boot-loader and programs to the SSD without re-installing them, you can download the software from CNET: http://download.cnet.com/Aomei-Partition-Assistant-Home...
!