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Core i5 760 or Core i7 870

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September 11, 2010 9:52:58 AM

Hi friends
I want to build a system. I want to build a normal gaming system. I also run visual studio.net , Ms Office Application, Browsing and winrar. I want to keep new system for at least 5 years. I have two choices one is core i5 760 second one is core i7 860 and third is core i7 870. I want to know about the performance difference between these cpu in single threaded applications. I know that core i5 760 lacks hyper threading. I can afford i5 price wise easily. Kindly guide me in this regards. What is the difference in i5 and i7 speed other then hyper threading in running applications like antivirus winrar games.


Thanks in Advance

Asad Naqvi

More about : core 760 core 870

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September 11, 2010 10:21:32 AM

Well the difference between the i5-7xx and the i7-860/870 is visible only in apps like Photoshop, 3DS Max, CAD etc. 'cause of hyperthreading. For your needs i'd get the i5-760, there is really little difference in games between these 3 CPU's.

i7-875k is a different story 'cause it's unlocked, but you aren't considering this CPU anyway.
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September 11, 2010 6:57:53 PM

Have you actually tried looking at benchmarks that compare these processors, or are you just being a wee bit lazy?

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/109?vs=107

OK, it's an i5-750 (760 is not in the list) compared to the i7-870 but the results are good enough I think.

Based on those figures I don't think Hyperthreading in this case makes enough of a difference to justify the price premium.

I'd go i5-760.
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September 11, 2010 8:04:00 PM

id also go for the i5 760, but why are you not looking into the i7 930 it is $199 at microcenter, just suggested it as lga 1366 has a better upgrade path as in the future when prices go down you can upgrade to a hexacore, but thats even if the i7 980x goes down in price enough to afford it and so on, also as lga 1366 mobos have 2 x16 lanes (not that makes such a huge difference though) just wanted to say if you definitely want to go for an i7 i would rather go for the lga 1366 option, but honestly for your needs i would go for an i5 760
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September 11, 2010 8:08:54 PM

Actually the upgrade path is gone for LGA 1366, once Sandy bridge comes out its done because Sandy bridge offers Quad channel memory while LGA 1366 only offers Tri-Channel memory. It may not be "done" though in the sense people will still use them. But i'd expect Intel to stop releasing as much i7 1366 chips as they used to =P just a guess though. I'd actually just stick to the 1156 =P 8x compared to 16x is a huge difference as he stated. The only difference in CF or SLI performance is 2% (tested by bit tech)
September 11, 2010 8:58:13 PM

intel has stopped poducing cpus for both sockets im just saying that if he goes with lga 1366 he can upgrade to a i7 980x when it gets cheaper and it is a hexacore
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September 11, 2010 9:37:00 PM

gordon_81 said:
intel has stopped poducing cpus for both sockets im just saying that if he goes with lga 1366 he can upgrade to a i7 980x when it gets cheaper and it is a hexacore


Who says Intel have stopped producing chips for the current sockets? The 990X is due soon and the top-end Sandy Bridge with Quad-channel memory won't see the light of day until this time next year.

And the Extreme Edition processors never officially get cheaper, so he'd never be able to get a new 980X for less than the $1,000 it retails for now.


In any case, this is going far off topic - the OP won't see any benefit going higher than i5-760.
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September 11, 2010 10:11:09 PM

Yea. It's true Extreme series chips never get cheap. There Q series extreme edition chips are still pretty much what they were when they were released.

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a b à CPUs
September 12, 2010 12:25:06 AM
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Let me take a slightly different approach . . . if spending a little more for the 8XX won't force you to compromise on other parts of your system, go for it. It will perform slightly better all around.

However, if you were to game with the 750 for 6 months, then upgrade to the 8xx, you wouldn't notice the difference.

Either will game very well when paired with the right vid card(s). If your screen resolution is less than 1920 (and will remain so over the next 5 years), they might well both be overkill.

Also keep in mind that Asus/Giga/Other mobo makers include OCing software that allow applying a mild overclock with one mouse click. EG, a 2.66GHz 750 will go to 3.0GHz, and run fine on the stock cooler. While not totally ideal, its highly workable. So you don't need to be a "pro" to get a boost if needed.
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September 12, 2010 2:27:19 AM

The AMD "Extreme" chips eventually went down in price (FX-60), but then again by then they weren't very extreme anymore.
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September 12, 2010 3:50:13 AM

eVGA has refurb X58 mobos real cheap on the company webstore (http://www.evga.com/products/prodlist.asp?switch=20). If you can find a deal on a i7 930 from Fry's or Microcenter, its win/win.

Otherwise, buy a i5 760 and spend the money on SSD or a better video card. The big performance difference between the 8xx and 7xx is in video coding and in 3d rendering.
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September 12, 2010 4:56:59 AM

Refurb = fail. To be honest, I dislike refurbished things, you have that chance it will fail again. Usually once it fails, the company's tech support sucks. So i would stay away from open box items, refurb items, etc.
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September 12, 2010 8:17:29 AM

aznshinobi said:
Refurb = fail. To be honest, I dislike refurbished things, you have that chance it will fail again. Usually once it fails, the company's tech support sucks. So i would stay away from open box items, refurb items, etc.


+1
September 16, 2010 12:06:55 AM

+2
a b à CPUs
September 16, 2010 12:14:11 AM

aznshinobi said:
Refurb = fail. To be honest, I dislike refurbished things, you have that chance it will fail again. Usually once it fails, the company's tech support sucks. So i would stay away from open box items, refurb items, etc.

However Refurb > Used, at least you get basic support of items. $100 for a X58 board is a nice deal.
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September 16, 2010 12:29:59 AM

Well that's obvious, but refurbs also mean "re-fixed" They still have the same likely-hood to break again. Although yes 100$ is a good deal for an X58
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September 16, 2010 2:11:32 AM

As LePhuronn stated, the i5 760 is better than the i7 870 for your needs.

I have to say that I too was contemplating those two CPUs as well, at least until I was notified that my responsibilities at work was being re-deployed to someone else down south in North Carolina (i.e. I will soon be unemployed).

I play some games, but games don't really take advantage of hyperthreading. However, I like to encode my movie collection using the x.264 codec which does use hyperthreading. I was contemplating if that alone was worth paying the extra $$$ for the i7 860.

Needless to say my company made the decision for me... I will not be upgrading.
September 23, 2010 3:51:23 AM

Best answer selected by asadmcs.
September 23, 2010 3:52:52 AM

I am going for core i5 760. Thank you all for my help and providing me best guide line.
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September 23, 2010 6:49:56 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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