Why does my quad core motherboard use 24 and 2 x 4 atx connectors

Hello, i have a quad core that i use for gaming and i wanted to know why do i need the extra 4 pin power connector next to the atx it boots up and i have no problems with runnning games with it disconnected do you think i should connect it or would it cause long term damage to my board or possibly burn it out
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  1. Your motherboar most likely supports both 4-pin ATX and 8-pin ATX, as most board do, since not all PSU have a 8-pin ATX connector.

    It isn't required but if you PSU and motherboard have the ability, it is recommended. You won't really see any issues until you start overclocking your system, which at that point it might become unstable.
  2. tecmo34 said:
    Your motherboar most likely supports both 4-pin ATX and 8-pin ATX, as most board do, since not all PSU have a 8-pin ATX connector.

    It isn't required but if you PSU and motherboard have the ability, it is recommended. You won't really see any issues until you start overclocking your system, which at that point it might become unstable.


    hello and thanks for the response and ill explain i have a gigabyte m68m-s2p motherboardand it has a 24 pin axt power connecter then it has space for 4pins extra and then a seperate 4 pin for my quad processor. the processor is an amd athlon II X4 620 2.60ghz graphics are nvidia 9600gt sli 1 gb pci-e 4gb nvidia sli ram 2gb x 2 do you think i need more power for everything to run smooth i have a 500w power supply
  3. If you have a High overclock on a 95 W proc, or have a 125 W proc then you should use the 8 Pin connection.

    Myself, if you have the 8 Pin connector from the PSU, I would use the 8 Pin even though the 4 Pin is fine. It decreases the loss by placing additional paths in parallel.

    Purely hypothetical, But explains the reasoning: Assume a 1 ft Wire had 0.1 ohm resistance and you had 10 Amps flowing. If the PSU voltage as 12 V. You would lose 1 Volt and only have 11 Volts at the load. Now if you used two wires (same 1 Amp, same 12 V) then the two Wires would now only be 0.05 ohms and you would only lose 0.5 V and have 11.5 V at the Load. My wire resistance is way high (usually in milliohms) but illustrates the concept.
  4. 2nd question, is 500 Watts enough.

    I have a I5-750 @ 3.2 Ghz (mild OC), ATI 5770 GPU, 1 SSD, 2 HDD, 1 DVDR, 1 Blu-ray writer, 4 gigs ram and I only draw approx 300 Watts. I would not feel uneasy using a 400 Watt corsair PSU, But would lose sleep if it was a 500 W low quality PSU.

    You should check reviews on your PSU, Only use good quality PSUs. There is a chart that ranks (in a tier system), but do not have the link.
  5. RetiredChief said:
    2nd question, is 500 Watts enough.

    I have a I5-750 @ 3.2 Ghz (mild OC), ATI 5770 GPU, 1 SSD, 2 HDD, 1 DVDR, 1 Blu-ray writer, 4 gigs ram and I only draw approx 300 Watts. I would not feel uneasy using a 400 Watt corsair PSU, But would lose sleep if it was a 500 W low quality PSU.

    You should check reviews on your PSU, Only use good quality PSUs. There is a chart that ranks (in a tier system), but do not have the link.


    thanks again for the help and quick response i have a Thermaltake TR2 500W ATX12V & EPS12V Power Supply do you think i should switch it up or keep it. i mean it gets the job done but i will take the advice because it never hurt to listen to a person who knows what they are talking about and thank you for the help
  6. @RetiredChief: Here is the link that you referred to... http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/278567-28-ranked-list-guide
  7. tecmo34 - thanks, good Reading.

    Alfredo:
    It looks like the TR2 is in tier 4, Just one level above "Don't Buy/Junk". I try to by nothing below tier 2. The Corsair's are very good, and newegg often has a sale on them.
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=108088

    if you have the cash go for. You will sleep better knowing you have an excellent PSU
    450 Watt Corsair $81 - $20 MIR http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139003
    550 Watt corsair $86 - $10 MIR http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139004


    Two Pointers.
    1) Look at your +12V and +5 V. I use CPUID HWMonitor. It shows current Voltage as well as Min/Max. Look at the difference between Min and mak as you go from Idle to running a taxing program - I use Furmark or Prime 95 to load system. Your 12 V should not go below 11.6 V (Spec is min = 11.4V) and + 5 should not drop below 4.75V. If Voltages are way out like 12 V is 15 or 10 V then software is not reporting it correctly. Same for +5, if it comes up as +3.xx it is incorrect.
    HWMonitor: http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html

    2) Buy one of the Power meters to determine your real power. The calculators error on the high side. Very easy to use. Plug it into your outlet, Plug your Computer (only computer) into meter. Turn computer on, This will be the idle current. Run furmark to load the computer. This is what you base your PSU requirement on. Say it reads 350 Watts, add 20 % 350 +70 = 420 Watts - this is your minium for current configuration. Also try to include future upgrades, like adding a 2nd Video card for SLI/Xfire.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882715001&cm_re=Watt_meter-_-82-715-001-_-Product
    FurMark Link: http://www.ozone3d.net/benchmarks/fur/

    Also Handy and easy to use: A digital voltmeter is also a good investment. (1) Tells you that the software is reporting the voltages correctly. Black meter lead to black wire at a molex connector, red meter lead to ethier end of molex connector for +5 and +12 V. Meters come in very handy for the car (ie check the voltage output of the alternator - should be greater than 13.6 V with headlight on), For check AA/D cell batteries, and other around-the-house uses. Can get cheap one at autostore, or possibly walmart - Radioshack, only if one sale at half price.
  8. wow you have been a great help RetiredChief ill make sure ill get 550 Watt corsair monday looks and sound like a great investment
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