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Any device to connect home wired Ethernet to outside 802.1..

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 7, 2004 10:58:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Is there any wireless device (802.11 type. compatible with WiFi
hot spots) that would interface to the outside WiFi network and
connect local devices with Ethernet cable, i.e. it would act as a
router, firewall for local wired dekstops/laptops and provide access
to Internet through a single 802.11 port. It would be a *reverse* of
the popular Linksys wireless router that connects to Internet through
a wired port.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 7, 2004 10:58:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

MMM42 wrote:

>
> Is there any wireless device (802.11 type. compatible with WiFi
> hot spots) that would interface to the outside WiFi network and
> connect local devices with Ethernet cable, i.e. it would act as a
> router, firewall for local wired dekstops/laptops and provide access
> to Internet through a single 802.11 port. It would be a *reverse* of
> the popular Linksys wireless router that connects to Internet through
> a wired port.

It's not clear what exactly you're looking for that a Linksys, Netgear,
Belkin, or other brand of WAP with switch doesn't provide.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 8, 2004 2:33:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 15:05:28 -0500, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>MMM42 wrote:
>
>>
>> Is there any wireless device (802.11 type. compatible with WiFi
>> hot spots) that would interface to the outside WiFi network and
>> connect local devices with Ethernet cable, i.e. it would act as a
>> router, firewall for local wired dekstops/laptops and provide access
>> to Internet through a single 802.11 port. It would be a *reverse* of
>> the popular Linksys wireless router that connects to Internet through
>> a wired port.
>
>It's not clear what exactly you're looking for that a Linksys, Netgear,
>Belkin, or other brand of WAP with switch doesn't provide.
>

Are you saying that I can take a wireless router like Linksys WRT54G
that mentions only one interface to backbone Internet through its
wired Ethernet port and then use it in reverse, i.e. use its wireless
interface for backbone Internet and connect a laptop to the router
with an Ethernet cable. Manual does not mention such a setup.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 8, 2004 2:33:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

MMM42 wrote:

> On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 15:05:28 -0500, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>>MMM42 wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Is there any wireless device (802.11 type. compatible with WiFi
>>> hot spots) that would interface to the outside WiFi network and
>>> connect local devices with Ethernet cable, i.e. it would act as a
>>> router, firewall for local wired dekstops/laptops and provide access
>>> to Internet through a single 802.11 port. It would be a *reverse* of
>>> the popular Linksys wireless router that connects to Internet through
>>> a wired port.
>>
>>It's not clear what exactly you're looking for that a Linksys, Netgear,
>>Belkin, or other brand of WAP with switch doesn't provide.
>>
>
> Are you saying that I can take a wireless router like Linksys WRT54G
> that mentions only one interface to backbone Internet through its
> wired Ethernet port and then use it in reverse, i.e. use its wireless
> interface for backbone Internet and connect a laptop to the router
> with an Ethernet cable. Manual does not mention such a setup.

Connect the laptop to one of the switch ports. The WRT54G has four of them.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 8, 2004 8:13:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 19:25:22 -0500, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:


>
>Connect the laptop to one of the switch ports. The WRT54G has four of them.
>

It has also one port for power supply!??%^*^??
Frankly, leave the subject to folks who know more about wireless.
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 8, 2004 8:13:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

MMM42 wrote:

> On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 19:25:22 -0500, "J. Clarke"
> <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>Connect the laptop to one of the switch ports. The WRT54G has four of
>>them.
>>
>
> It has also one port for power supply!??%^*^??
> Frankly, leave the subject to folks who know more about wireless.

I'm not sure I understand what point you think you are making about having a
port for the power supply. The device in question, if you will be kind
enough to go to the Netgear site and look at the datasheet, is a
multipurpose device combining a four port Fast Ethernet switch, an 802.11g
WAP, and a NAT router with some other bells and whistles providing a fifth
Ethernet port. He can connect his laptop to any of the four ports of the
Fast Ethernet switch and it will be able to access devices connected via
802.11g.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 8, 2004 3:10:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

"MMM42" <MMM42@nospam2.com> wrote in message
news:418e7aa9.261502718@news-server.cfl.rr.com...
>
> Is there any wireless device (802.11 type. compatible with WiFi
> hot spots) that would interface to the outside WiFi network and
> connect local devices with Ethernet cable, i.e. it would act as a
> router, firewall for local wired dekstops/laptops and provide access
> to Internet through a single 802.11 port. It would be a *reverse* of
> the popular Linksys wireless router that connects to Internet through
> a wired port.
>
>
What you want is a wireless bridge. Linksys, DLink, and I would bet many
others make them. The ideal one would be one that is the same manufacturer
as the WAP of the originating network.
!