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My emachine wont boot

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April 22, 2011 3:12:22 PM

Hello, when i insert the restore disk it wont start the computer has not been in use for a while

More about : emachine wont boot

a c 108 V Motherboard
April 22, 2011 5:47:00 PM

When you press the power button, do either of these scenarios happen:

1. System powers up, but no display on the monitor
2. System powers up for a brief moment, then shuts down
3. System seems to power up, but no fans are spinning
4. System does not power up at all

If any of the above scenarios are what you experience, please indicate which one. Also, if there is a combination of scenarios, please describe.
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July 4, 2011 9:16:26 AM

4.System does not power up at all
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a c 108 V Motherboard
July 5, 2011 5:57:39 PM

Eddy,

There are several reasons why the PC won't power up:

1. Bad Power Supply Unit (PSU) - use a paperclip to jump the green wire with any of the black wires on the P1 (20/24-pin) connector. If this powers up the PSU, reconnect the PSU to the mobo, and then press the power button. Now, get yourself a digital multimeter to check the voltages from the P1 connector. The black lead/probe can be touched against any black wire on the P1, or any bare metal spot on the PC case. The red lead/probe will have to be touched against the following wires:

Red = +5V
Yellow = +12V
Orange = +3.3V
Blue = -12V
Purple = +5V
Brown = +3.3V
Gray = 0 to 5 V when the power switch is turned on.
The tolerances can be +/- 5%.

2. Dead CMOS battery. CMOS is what stores all the boot info for the BIOS, and its memory is saved by a CR2032 battery. These batteries have a typical life span of 3-4 years, sometimes longer, if the computer isn't used very often. You can pick up a new battery from just about anywhere batteries are sold, and they're fairly inexpensive.

3. Cables - One of the most common overlooked steps in a diagnosis is checking the power cable(s). Although it is uncommon to fail, it can happen. Consider checking the power cables by swaping them out. For example, if your monitor can power on, turn it off and then unplug it. Use the power cable that you unplugged from the monitor to power up the PC.

4. Electrical Source - Like the power cables, the electrical source is often overlooked as a possible reason for the PC not powering up. If using a wall outlet, simply test it by removing the PC power, and then plugging something else in the place of the PC power cable. If using a surge protector, verify that it hasn't failed (or plug the PC directly into the wall). If using a UPS, ensure that it isn't on battery mode.

5. Motherboard - Just like any other component, the mobo is not immune to failure. If there has been any recent power spikes or surges, your mobo could have suffered some damage. Also, some motherboards are quite sensitive to the way CMOS is cleared (some require you to disconnect both the P1 and the P4 connectors), if using the jumper method. Breadboard your system to eliminate possible shorts between the mobo and the case. Click on the link in my signature for more help, including jsc's guide to breadboarding.
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July 27, 2011 10:34:43 AM

T_T said:
Eddy,
Hey Eddie, I have an emachines W3105 that has been in a box for awhile and now when I hit the power button it fires up okay but revs high and no signal to the monitor. Got any ideas?
Thanks,

Shipfixer.

There are several reasons why the PC won't power up:

1. Bad Power Supply Unit (PSU) - use a paperclip to jump the green wire with any of the black wires on the P1 (20/24-pin) connector. If this powers up the PSU, reconnect the PSU to the mobo, and then press the power button. Now, get yourself a digital multimeter to check the voltages from the P1 connector. The black lead/probe can be touched against any black wire on the P1, or any bare metal spot on the PC case. The red lead/probe will have to be touched against the following wires:

Red = +5V
Yellow = +12V
Orange = +3.3V
Blue = -12V
Purple = +5V
Brown = +3.3V
Gray = 0 to 5 V when the power switch is turned on.
The tolerances can be +/- 5%.

2. Dead CMOS battery. CMOS is what stores all the boot info for the BIOS, and its memory is saved by a CR2032 battery. These batteries have a typical life span of 3-4 years, sometimes longer, if the computer isn't used very often. You can pick up a new battery from just about anywhere batteries are sold, and they're fairly inexpensive.

3. Cables - One of the most common overlooked steps in a diagnosis is checking the power cable(s). Although it is uncommon to fail, it can happen. Consider checking the power cables by swaping them out. For example, if your monitor can power on, turn it off and then unplug it. Use the power cable that you unplugged from the monitor to power up the PC.

4. Electrical Source - Like the power cables, the electrical source is often overlooked as a possible reason for the PC not powering up. If using a wall outlet, simply test it by removing the PC power, and then plugging something else in the place of the PC power cable. If using a surge protector, verify that it hasn't failed (or plug the PC directly into the wall). If using a UPS, ensure that it isn't on battery mode.

5. Motherboard - Just like any other component, the mobo is not immune to failure. If there has been any recent power spikes or surges, your mobo could have suffered some damage. Also, some motherboards are quite sensitive to the way CMOS is cleared (some require you to disconnect both the P1 and the P4 connectors), if using the jumper method. Breadboard your system to eliminate possible shorts between the mobo and the case. Click on the link in my signature for more help, including jsc's guide to breadboarding.

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!