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Cpu/ram compatibility

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September 17, 2010 6:23:29 AM

Hi,
I want to buy the AMD Phenom II X6 1055t CPU and I suspect based on my research that it doesn't support 2000 Mhz RAM (DDR3). The AM3 mobo with the 770 chipset supports 2000 Mhz RAM and the CPU that I want to buy. If the motherboard will support the RAM, does that mean that the CPU will support it also?

More about : cpu ram compatibility

a b à CPUs
September 17, 2010 6:34:27 AM

Any particular reason to get 2000 MHz RAM?It will only improve benchmark scores, you'll not notice any difference in the real world.
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a c 83 à CPUs
September 17, 2010 6:52:38 AM

The mobo can't support 2000MHz ram as the memory controller is on the CPU, NOT the mobo. If your OC the 1055T and use the "right" memory divider then you can get the ram running at 2000MHz. I agree with Tamz however. Even 1600MHz ram is pushing it.
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a b à CPUs
September 17, 2010 7:04:34 AM

My guess is that you'll be fine; RAM can run in multiple modes so it will clock itself slower if required. Also, as Tamz_msc says, you probably won't notice the difference between 1600 or 2000Mhz where RAM is concerned.
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September 17, 2010 5:37:32 PM

Tamz_msc said:
Any particular reason to get 2000 MHz RAM?It will only improve benchmark scores, you'll not notice any difference in the real world.



I have read several resources, including a reputable magazine, that there is some noticable difference in running several different kinds of applications and switching to different applications between 1600 Mhz and 2000 Mhz. It isn't terribly important that I get 2000 versus 1600 or even 1333, but I wonder if programmers will be writing programs that utilize speeds like 2000 more usefully in the future. I don't understand a lot about this stuff, so I know that the statement that using faster RAM may improve performance in the future may seem very silly. I would like to know, however, a little more about what the main differences are between benchmark scoring and the real world scoring. Plz respond.
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September 17, 2010 6:00:31 PM

Herr_Koos said:
My guess is that you'll be fine; RAM can run in multiple modes so it will clock itself slower if required. Also, as Tamz_msc says, you probably won't notice the difference between 1600 or 2000Mhz where RAM is concerned.



I'm curious about what you mean by multiple modes. Will u plz explain that for me?
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September 17, 2010 6:06:53 PM

4745454b said:
The mobo can't support 2000MHz ram as the memory controller is on the CPU, NOT the mobo. If your OC the 1055T and use the "right" memory divider then you can get the ram running at 2000MHz. I agree with Tamz however. Even 1600MHz ram is pushing it.



I am not concerned about getting 2000 Mhz RAM right now necessarily. Would u mind explaining what u mean by memory controller and memory divider? I want to learn more about how the RAM, CPU, and mobo are interrelated. What I have read is that the fsb is what determines the optimal speed that the RAM puts out.
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September 17, 2010 6:20:51 PM

I figured out that the 770 chipset does not mention that the 6 core CPU is supported in the specs. Is it the AM3 socket that I need to look for and does it matter if the specs show x6 or not, as long as it shows the AM3 socket? I found some mobos that specify that they support x6 processors, but not all of the mobos show that but do show that they support AM3.
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a b à CPUs
September 18, 2010 10:49:39 AM

You will need an AM3 socket plus a motherboard that can deliver the required power to the CPU. The X6 requires 125W if I am not mistaken, thus it will not work on a board that is rated for only 95W CPU's. If the CPU compatibility list does not include the X6, you are taking a big risk that it will not work.
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September 18, 2010 8:45:29 PM

Herr_Koos said:
You will need an AM3 socket plus a motherboard that can deliver the required power to the CPU. The X6 requires 125W if I am not mistaken, thus it will not work on a board that is rated for only 95W CPU's. If the CPU compatibility list does not include the X6, you are taking a big risk that it will not work.



According to the AMD website, there are both a 95W and a 125W version of the 1055t.
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August 6, 2011 9:47:00 PM

dragonfly522 said:
I have read several resources, including a reputable magazine, that there is some noticable difference in running several different kinds of applications and switching to different applications between 1600 Mhz and 2000 Mhz. It isn't terribly important that I get 2000 versus 1600 or even 1333, but I wonder if programmers will be writing programs that utilize speeds like 2000 more usefully in the future. I don't understand a lot about this stuff, so I know that the statement that using faster RAM may improve performance in the future may seem very silly. I would like to know, however, a little more about what the main differences are between benchmark scoring and the real world scoring. Plz respond.


Obviously not for gaming.

If you're working with high quality audio (for example 96KHz OR 192KHz and 24bit) and run more than 60 tracks in a DAW with loads of effects where you have at least 10 high quality samples loaded into the memory and they are all live-playable (which takes up to 4-8GiB or even more RAM) and all of this in REAL TIME (2-4ms), you ARE going to notice the difference between the two kinds os RAM...

You're thinking now "who's this c**t". That is me. And that's what I'm doing every day for a living... Video editing is the same story.
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