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What do I need to connect my computer to a TV with HDMI input?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 9, 2010 8:10:46 PM

Hello everyone!

My question is as follows:-
What do I need to connect my computer to a TV with HDMI input?

My graphic card is GT240 and it got HDMI port, which I believe is output :D 
will it work with HDMI TV by just connecting them using HDMI to HDMI cable?
or do I need anything else?
June 9, 2010 8:12:28 PM

no, the cable is all, do you know if it a HDMI 1 or 2 1=no sound, 2 has sound, if it's a 1 you will need cables for stereo sound as well
June 9, 2010 8:14:22 PM

Well, I have no clue,
I am just planning to buy a TV so I am asking this question as it would be cool if I would be able to use it for movies and such.

Also what is the HDCP? do I need to know any information about this? or do I have to buy a TV with HDCP in its HDMI?
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June 9, 2010 8:29:47 PM

HDCP stands for High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection, a copy protection scheme to eliminate the possibility of intercepting digital data midstream between the source to the display, it is highly recommended that any HDTV you purchase is compatible.
read HDCP=DRM=Destroying Retail Markets
they don't want you to put something that would intercept the signal so you could copy the program
June 9, 2010 9:38:16 PM

So if I bought a TV which is not HDCP compatible, it won't work with the computer?
June 9, 2010 10:32:47 PM

well, you can hook any tv to a computer, you just need a converter box,HDMI looks great, converter boxes look good
June 9, 2010 11:20:27 PM

number13 said:
well, you can hook any tv to a computer, you just need a converter box,HDMI looks great, converter boxes look good


Yes, if the TV doesn't have HDCP, the HDMI won't work? I know a converter box would do it but I prefer the HDMI!
so the question is if the TV doesn't have HDCP, will it still work with my computer through HDMI?


@OvrClkr I buy that card? or its included with the motherboard or what? :heink: 
June 9, 2010 11:41:06 PM

what GTS 240 did you buy?
June 10, 2010 3:39:28 AM

if the tv does not HDCP, HDMI will work, but the RIAA has made such a fuss pirates are "stealing" their stuff(pirates do not steal, they copy)that they are coercing gov't worls wide that it is bad, the irony here is that the reason pirating is so bad is because of such poor quality media, and pirates are downloading very high quality(consequestially larger files) material, all this could be solved by selliing high quality stuff, it is no harder or costly, they are just lazy,(FWIW- I am in CHina, I just went to Walmart and bought a real movie from Fox has the security label and all, you may have heard of it James Cameron's "AVATAR" I paid $3.50 USD for it, so tell me who's getting ripped off) but anyway back on target, if the TV doesn't have HDCP in some instances or maybe later on you might not be able to recieve a certain program from a provider, maybe Google a search on HDCP and see what you find, like I said here in China, DRM is farce, so all the info I get from my search engine, enjoy
June 10, 2010 11:30:04 AM

@OvrClkr
I bought the gigabyte made one "GV-N240D3-1GI" and its user manual didn't mention that S/PDIF is required, it had an image of the card and the HDMI port is connected with the HDMI TV with HDMI cable.

But the motherboard's user manual mentioned that some cards requires to connect S/PDIF to the card as you said and also mentioned to check the user manual of the card to check if it is required.

@Number13
My card supports HDCP so I am afraid the TV won't receive the image on its screen!
June 10, 2010 11:42:50 AM

if the tv has HDMI, it will, the problem is broadcast, HDCP (DRM), the tv is not HDCP compliant, it MAYBE limited in programming( there is no real standard yet, other than HDCP in it's self), and broadcasters have to think about customers with older equipment, so I don't see this as a issue for a while yet
as for audio if you aren't going to HT(Home Theater),5.1 or 7.1 the SPDIF is not reqiired, a 3.5MM to RCA adapter cable will do the trick, plug the 3.5 into the audio out jack and the RCA's to the TV, viola,stereo
but this is all speculation, till he decides on a make and model, we can't really say what he needs or doesn't need
btw,spec's say:
Supports Native HDMI 1.3a
Allows you to transfer high-definiton video and audio to your HDTV with a single HDMI cable.
so you cannot hook a SPDIF to the card
June 10, 2010 12:06:51 PM

So here you are
Specifications
The HDMI specification defines the protocols, signals, electrical interfaces, and mechanical requirements of the standard.[39] The maximum pixel clock rate for HDMI 1.0 was 165 MHz, which was sufficient for supporting 1080p and WUXGA (1920×1200) at 60 Hz. HDMI 1.3 increased that to 340 MHz, which allows for higher resolution (such as WQXGA, 2560×1600) across a single digital link.[40] An HDMI connection can either be single-link (Type A/C) or dual-link (Type B) and can have a video pixel rate of 25 MHz to 340 MHz (for a single-link connection) or 25 MHz to 680 MHz (for a dual-link connection). Video formats with rates below 25 MHz (e.g., 13.5 MHz for 480i/NTSC) are transmitted using a pixel-repetition scheme.[1]

[edit] Audio/Video
HDMI 1.0 to HDMI 1.2a uses the CEA-861-B video standard, and HDMI 1.3+ uses the CEA-861-D video standard.[41] The CEA-861-D document defines the video timing requirements, discovery structures, and data transfer structure.[42] The color spaces that can be used by HDMI are ITU-R BT.601, ITU-R BT.709-5, and IEC 61966-2-4.[43] HDMI can encode the video in xvYCC 4:4:4 (8–16 bits per component), sRGB 4:4:4 (8–16 bits per component), YCbCr 4:4:4 (8–16 bits per component), or YCbCr 4:2:2 (8–12 bits per component).[43][44]

HDMI supports up to 8 channels of uncompressed audio at sample sizes of 16-bit, 20-bit, and 24-bit, with sample rates of 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, and 192 kHz.[20][45] HDMI also supports any IEC 61937-compliant compressed audio stream, such as Dolby Digital and DTS, and up to 8 channels of one-bit DSD audio (used on Super Audio CDs) at rates up to four times that of Super Audio CD.[45] With version 1.3, HDMI supports lossless compressed audio streams Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio.[45]
that should answer all the questions, you need a type C cable, and you are good to go, now what tv are you getting
June 10, 2010 2:43:23 PM

If the TV/Screen has HDMI it will work, if it doesnt it wont. Simple as that =)
June 10, 2010 2:50:34 PM

Thinking of Benq LCD TV SK3731
June 10, 2010 2:55:50 PM

HD tv, you go boy, looks great, maybe next year I can afford one
June 10, 2010 2:59:24 PM

Hamadamoh said:
@OvrClkr
I bought the gigabyte made one "GV-N240D3-1GI" and its user manual didn't mention that S/PDIF is required, it had an image of the card and the HDMI port is connected with the HDMI TV with HDMI cable.


I did some research on the 220 and found out that it does not require an SPDIF cable, just plug the HDMI cable from the tv to the card and you are set. Nvidia removed the SPDIF riser and integrated it onto the card. You might need to adjust a few properties in the control panel under "audio" but thats about it.
June 10, 2010 9:02:48 PM

number13 said:
HD tv, you go boy, looks great, maybe next year I can afford one


Its cheap for such specifications, and I believe it would be really cool to have such TV that can provide a quality of 1080p

@OvrClkr
Thank you for effort, you really helped me! also special thanks to Number13 :p 

I will probably post later if I bought the TV in a small period of time and write what I would experience!
!