Battery in or out when on A/C?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.

Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
in.

If this is such a big problem, why don't the laptop manufacturers
include circuitry to eliminate the problem?

Thanks

--
PC: HP Omnibook 6000
OS: Win 2K SP-4 (5.00.2195)
LAN: P2P with an HP Vectra workstation
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
(11/03/04)
22 answers Last reply
More about battery
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
    > remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
    > the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
    > am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.
    >
    > Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
    > big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
    > in.

    Let the battery inside.

    The information is based on technology 10 years ago.

    Now there are Lithium Ion instead of NiMh,
    now there are far better chargers built in

    It's an ancient legend.

    It's like You shoud bring the battery of Your car and the
    sparks inside Your house in order to start Your car
    in winter.

    Was really necessary 1930 or so.


    --
    Roland Mösl
    http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
    http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "Roland Mösl" <founder@pege.org> wrote in message
    news:4191c406$0$25104$91cee783@newsreader02.highway.telekom.at...
    > > I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
    > > remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
    > > the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
    > > am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.
    > >
    > > Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
    > > big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
    > > in.
    >
    > Let the battery inside.
    >
    > The information is based on technology 10 years ago.
    >
    > Now there are Lithium Ion instead of NiMh,
    > now there are far better chargers built in
    >
    > It's an ancient legend.
    >
    > It's like You shoud bring the battery of Your car and the
    > sparks inside Your house in order to start Your car
    > in winter.
    >
    > Was really necessary 1930 or so.

    Not bad advice if you don't mind spending $120 or so replacing your battery.
    Remove it when not needed for long periods(such as using it as a desktop for
    months at a time). Li on batteries are far better than their older
    counterparts but they do go bad and are much more expensive to replace.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 06:16:27 -0500, ";-p"
    <no_spam_here34474@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Roland Mösl" <founder@pege.org> wrote in message
    >news:4191c406$0$25104$91cee783@newsreader02.highway.telekom.at...
    >> > I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
    >> > remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
    >> > the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
    >> > am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.
    >> >
    >> > Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
    >> > big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
    >> > in.
    >>
    >> Let the battery inside.
    >>
    >> The information is based on technology 10 years ago.
    >>
    >> Now there are Lithium Ion instead of NiMh,
    >> now there are far better chargers built in
    >>
    >> It's an ancient legend.
    >>
    >> It's like You shoud bring the battery of Your car and the
    >> sparks inside Your house in order to start Your car
    >> in winter.
    >>
    >> Was really necessary 1930 or so.
    >
    >Not bad advice if you don't mind spending $120 or so replacing your battery.
    >Remove it when not needed for long periods(such as using it as a desktop for
    >months at a time). Li on batteries are far better than their older
    >counterparts but they do go bad and are much more expensive to replace.

    My laptop runs on A/C 99% of the time. It sits on my home office desk
    plugged into A/C with the battery in all day and all night, 24/7,
    except for (a) almost daily trips to my client office for a few hours
    and 4-5 times year on trips. On those trips, it runs on batteries
    whenever I can't find an A/C plug.

    I like to run with the battery in for the power outage protection. I
    also like having the battery fully charged all the time.

    I have had this laptop for over 3 years running it this way all that
    time. Just this last few months the battery has started to lose
    capacity.

    However, it travels betweeen my home office and clent office almost
    every day -- meaning that it gets powered off and on each time that
    happens.

    --
    Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
    (11/09/04)
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    ;-p wrote:

    >
    > "Roland Mösl" <founder@pege.org> wrote in message
    > news:4191c406$0$25104$91cee783@newsreader02.highway.telekom.at...
    >> > I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
    >> > remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
    >> > the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
    >> > am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.
    >> >
    >> > Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
    >> > big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
    >> > in.
    >>
    >> Let the battery inside.
    >>
    >> The information is based on technology 10 years ago.
    >>
    >> Now there are Lithium Ion instead of NiMh,
    >> now there are far better chargers built in
    >>
    >> It's an ancient legend.
    >>
    >> It's like You shoud bring the battery of Your car and the
    >> sparks inside Your house in order to start Your car
    >> in winter.
    >>
    >> Was really necessary 1930 or so.
    >
    > Not bad advice if you don't mind spending $120 or so replacing your
    > battery. Remove it when not needed for long periods(such as using it as a
    > desktop for months at a time). Li on batteries are far better than their
    > older counterparts but they do go bad and are much more expensive to
    > replace.

    If you do that you need to recharge the battery periodically to keep it from
    flatlining. Once the charge level on a lithium ion battery goes below a
    certain level its protective circuits kick in (after a few spectacular
    explosions the manufacturers started adding protective circuits to lithium
    rechargeable batteries of all flavors) and it can no longer be charged.

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:34:19 -0500, "J. Clarke"
    <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

    >;-p wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Roland Mösl" <founder@pege.org> wrote in message
    >> news:4191c406$0$25104$91cee783@newsreader02.highway.telekom.at...
    >>> > I have been reading some back posts here that (strongly) recommend to
    >>> > remove the batteries from the laptop when it is on A/C. I can't find
    >>> > the owner's manual for my Omnibook 6000 (3 years old) right now, bit I
    >>> > am pretty sure that it does not make this recommendation.
    >>> >
    >>> > Is there solid data to support this recommendation? Because it is a
    >>> > big pain to have to take the battery in and out every time I plug it
    >>> > in.
    >>>
    >>> Let the battery inside.
    >>>
    >>> The information is based on technology 10 years ago.
    >>>
    >>> Now there are Lithium Ion instead of NiMh,
    >>> now there are far better chargers built in
    >>>
    >>> It's an ancient legend.
    >>>
    >>> It's like You shoud bring the battery of Your car and the
    >>> sparks inside Your house in order to start Your car
    >>> in winter.
    >>>
    >>> Was really necessary 1930 or so.
    >>
    >> Not bad advice if you don't mind spending $120 or so replacing your
    >> battery. Remove it when not needed for long periods(such as using it as a
    >> desktop for months at a time). Li on batteries are far better than their
    >> older counterparts but they do go bad and are much more expensive to
    >> replace.
    >
    >If you do that you need to recharge the battery periodically to keep it from
    >flatlining. Once the charge level on a lithium ion battery goes below a
    >certain level its protective circuits kick in (after a few spectacular
    >explosions the manufacturers started adding protective circuits to lithium
    >rechargeable batteries of all flavors) and it can no longer be charged.

    Hmmm... That may be what happened to my battery. I went on a long trip
    on an airlone without laptop outlets. I used the laptop down to the
    very last 2-3 minutes of battery power before shutting the machine
    off. It then sat for a day or so in my briefcase fully discharged.

    --
    Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
    (11/09/04)
  6. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > My laptop runs on A/C 99% of the time. It sits on my home office desk
    > plugged into A/C with the battery in all day and all night, 24/7,
    > except for (a) almost daily trips to my client office for a few hours
    > and 4-5 times year on trips. On those trips, it runs on batteries
    > whenever I can't find an A/C plug.
    >
    > I like to run with the battery in for the power outage protection. I
    > also like having the battery fully charged all the time.
    >
    > I have had this laptop for over 3 years running it this way all that
    > time. Just this last few months the battery has started to lose
    > capacity.

    The same happens both ways.

    Lithium Ion degrade by time, regardless of use.

    You can maybe reduce the degradation by some %.

    So for making Yourself a battery in and out monkey,
    Your battery could be in 40 month as bad as
    after 36 month with normal tratement.

    Let's split 120 on 36 or 40 month, and the difference
    is 33 Cent per month.

    Some peopel like to be a monkey for just 33 cent a month.

    I am no monkey, a power outage would cost me without
    battery shure more than $100.


    --
    Roland Mösl - http://www.pege.org - http://notebook.pege.org
    http://wds-internetwerbung.com Web Design startet an der Suchmaschine
  7. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    There is lots of information available via your favourite search engine in
    regard to use and storage like
    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/print-parttwo-34.htm but in brief the
    battery manufacturers appear to recommend any battery kept in storage for
    long periods is left at around 34% if memory serves.Whilst Li-On batteries
    do not suffer from a charging memory like older types their life span is
    usually given as between 3-5 years before a replacement should be sought on
    critical equipment.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > Fourth, while there is an argument to be made for keeping the battery in
    > the laptop as a UPS, it's a very expensive solution. In fact, it's a
    > $200 solution to a $30 problems. Almost all of the lithium based
    > batteries cost over $200. You can buy a 350va UPS (and I'm talking APC,
    > not junk) on sale for $30 or less. $30 or $200, which do you want to
    spend?

    $200 shure.

    The cheap UPS does not work when I change from one
    room to an other room.


    --
    Roland Mösl
    http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
    http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
  9. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Re:
    Roland Mösl wrote:

    >>Fourth, while there is an argument to be made for keeping the battery in
    >>the laptop as a UPS, it's a very expensive solution. In fact, it's a
    >>$200 solution to a $30 problems. Almost all of the lithium based
    >>batteries cost over $200. You can buy a 350va UPS (and I'm talking APC,
    >>not junk) on sale for $30 or less. $30 or $200, which do you want to
    >
    > spend?
    >
    > $200 shure.
    >
    > The cheap UPS does not work when I change from one
    > room to an other room.
    >
    >

    We were talking about a "fixed" laptop sitting on a desk -- basically a
    desktop replacment (even if only for a few days). The minute the laptop
    moves, whether it's to the next room or across the country, you have
    changed the ground rules of the situation under discussion.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > only in Thinkpads, to buy a R51. And I think IBM has the answer to this
    > problem: the machine does not charge the battery if - in my case, the
    > settings are adjustable - the charge level is between 95 and 99% full.

    All Li-Ion chargers are *supposed* to do this. Li-Ion batteries are
    rated for a certain number of charge-discharge cycles. Unfortunately,
    a "cycle" is eaten whether you discharged the battery to 1% or to
    99.999999%. So smart chargers do exactly what you describe here.

    Problem is, it's very hard to tell what exactly is happening in a
    laptop unless the manufacturer tells you details (which most don't).
    The "charge" indicator does not really mean what the manual says it
    does. The first phase of the "charge" process is to interrogate the
    battery's micro and start a cell test, during which time no actual
    charging is going on. The cell test can take several seconds.

    So simply seeing the charge LED go on briefly when you plug in a full
    battery doesn't really mean it was charging.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 05:05:35 GMT, Barry Watzman
    <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote:

    >
    >Re:
    >Roland Mösl wrote:
    >
    >>>Fourth, while there is an argument to be made for keeping the battery in
    >>>the laptop as a UPS, it's a very expensive solution. In fact, it's a
    >>>$200 solution to a $30 problems. Almost all of the lithium based
    >>>batteries cost over $200. You can buy a 350va UPS (and I'm talking APC,
    >>>not junk) on sale for $30 or less. $30 or $200, which do you want to
    >>
    >> spend?
    >>
    >> $200 shure.
    >>
    >> The cheap UPS does not work when I change from one
    >> room to an other room.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >We were talking about a "fixed" laptop sitting on a desk -- basically a
    >desktop replacment (even if only for a few days). The minute the laptop
    >moves, whether it's to the next room or across the country, you have
    >changed the ground rules of the situation under discussion.

    *You* were talking about a fixed laptop sitting on a desk.

    This is a valid scenario, but hardly the only scenario and probably
    not even one of the most common scenarios. My laptop sits on a desk
    99% of the time plugged into A/C. But it might be my home office desk
    or my client office desk. Occasionally, I need to take it into another
    room for a short period of time. When I do, I just unplug it and go.

    Also, when I am powering it of to go from one office to the other, I
    often start disconnecting the cabled (power, printer, cat-5) while it
    is powering down. With the battery removed, I would have to be careful
    to wait until it was all the way off before disconnecting the A/C.

    Finally, I sometimes take it to the car still running because it has a
    map or other information on it that I want to look at on the way or
    where I am going and I don't want to wait for W2K to come back up.

    The point is that my time is worth something. The aggravation of
    having to remember one more detail about the laptop, which is supposed
    to be a tool for my convenience, defeats the purpose.


    --
    Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
    (11/09/04)
  12. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    > >We were talking about a "fixed" laptop sitting on a desk -- basically a
    > >desktop replacment (even if only for a few days). The minute the laptop
    > >moves, whether it's to the next room or across the country, you have
    > >changed the ground rules of the situation under discussion.
    >
    > *You* were talking about a fixed laptop sitting on a desk.
    >
    > This is a valid scenario, but hardly the only scenario and probably
    > not even one of the most common scenarios. My laptop sits on a desk
    > 99% of the time plugged into A/C. But it might be my home office desk
    > or my client office desk. Occasionally, I need to take it into another
    > room for a short period of time. When I do, I just unplug it and go.

    According to Watzman

    Do You like to be free?

    If Your answer is no, just go in the next bank with a pistol.

    You will recieve 15 years free residence in a house named prison.
    When You compare this against the usual $1000 a month rent
    of an appartment, You can save with this action
    $180.000 rent for an appartment.

    The only small disadvantage: You are not free

    --
    Roland Mösl
    http://www.pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
    http://web-design-suite.com Web Design starts at the search engine
  13. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "Roland Mösl" <founder@pege.org> wrote in message
    news:4195feab$0$25176$91cee783@newsreader01.highway.telekom.at...
    > > >We were talking about a "fixed" laptop sitting on a desk -- basically a
    > > >desktop replacment (even if only for a few days). The minute the
    laptop
    > > >moves, whether it's to the next room or across the country, you have
    > > >changed the ground rules of the situation under discussion.
    > >
    > > *You* were talking about a fixed laptop sitting on a desk.
    > >
    > > This is a valid scenario, but hardly the only scenario and probably
    > > not even one of the most common scenarios. My laptop sits on a desk
    > > 99% of the time plugged into A/C. But it might be my home office desk
    > > or my client office desk. Occasionally, I need to take it into another
    > > room for a short period of time. When I do, I just unplug it and go.
    >
    > According to Watzman
    >
    > Do You like to be free?
    >
    > If Your answer is no, just go in the next bank with a pistol.
    >
    > You will recieve 15 years free residence in a house named prison.
    > When You compare this against the usual $1000 a month rent
    > of an appartment, You can save with this action
    > $180.000 rent for an appartment.
    >
    > The only small disadvantage: You are not free
    >
    > --
    You are arguing apples and oranges. Run free if you wish, Great! The
    discussion is regarding using the laptop as a desktop on a continuing basis.
    There are instances where you need to git and go but if used solely as a
    desktop then I still say "Remove the battery" untill needed.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    I'm not convinced this topic has received the substance it deserves --
    but there is something there after all.

    Namely, seems to me it makes *lots* of sense to run your laptop from a
    UPS, no battery, if it's going to be in one place for a while. Those
    battery prices, I believe, can only be ripoff rates.

    However, Topspin's comment about disconnecting his laptop while it was
    shutting down, seems to me another topic. This topic is *haste*. And
    in my view, his laptop's good health and the usual good access to what
    it holds today, are all *very much* more important than the seconds
    saved by haste. Further, I recently saw news of a study of
    multi-tasking, another hasty time saver, which showed that when
    someone multi-tasks, all the tasks get done less well and slower than
    when done one at a time. Which also, I suspect may be relevant to
    Topspin.

    Cheers -- Martha Adams
  15. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Martha H Adams wrote:

    > I'm not convinced this topic has received the substance it deserves --
    > but there is something there after all.
    >
    > Namely, seems to me it makes *lots* of sense to run your laptop from a
    > UPS, no battery, if it's going to be in one place for a while. Those
    > battery prices, I believe, can only be ripoff rates.

    Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery replacement
    for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.

    > However, Topspin's comment about disconnecting his laptop while it was
    > shutting down, seems to me another topic. This topic is *haste*. And
    > in my view, his laptop's good health and the usual good access to what
    > it holds today, are all *very much* more important than the seconds
    > saved by haste. Further, I recently saw news of a study of
    > multi-tasking, another hasty time saver, which showed that when
    > someone multi-tasks, all the tasks get done less well and slower than
    > when done one at a time. Which also, I suspect may be relevant to
    > Topspin.
    >
    > Cheers -- Martha Adams

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  16. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    news:co7nf332r8j@news3.newsguy.com...
    > Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    > laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery replacement
    > for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.

    A UPS battery lasts for several years and is likely less expensive than a
    notebook battery.

    However, won;t running without the notebook battery cause the notebook
    battery to discharge?
    If left out long enough, you might not even be able to recharge the notebook
    battery.
  17. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "Howard Kaikow" <kaikow@standards.com> wrote in message news:<co7qcg$j2k$1@pyrite.mv.net>...
    > "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    > news:co7nf332r8j@news3.newsguy.com...
    > > Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    > > laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery replacement
    > > for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.
    >
    > A UPS battery lasts for several years and is likely less expensive than a
    > notebook battery.
    >
    > However, won;t running without the notebook battery cause the notebook
    > battery to discharge?
    > If left out long enough, you might not even be able to recharge the notebook
    > battery.

    The point is---take care of your battery. There is a need to discharge
    and recharge from time to time. Earlier posts suggest that a new
    laptop battery may cost little when broken down by monthly cost and
    that is true BUT try to find a new laptop battery for a 5 year old
    machine. Good luck finding one that won't require a home equity loan.
  18. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    ;-p wrote:

    > "Howard Kaikow" <kaikow@standards.com> wrote in message
    > news:<co7qcg$j2k$1@pyrite.mv.net>...
    >> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    >> news:co7nf332r8j@news3.newsguy.com...
    >> > Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    >> > laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery
    >> > replacement
    >> > for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.
    >>
    >> A UPS battery lasts for several years and is likely less expensive than a
    >> notebook battery.
    >>
    >> However, won;t running without the notebook battery cause the notebook
    >> battery to discharge?
    >> If left out long enough, you might not even be able to recharge the
    >> notebook battery.
    >
    > The point is---take care of your battery. There is a need to discharge
    > and recharge from time to time. Earlier posts suggest that a new
    > laptop battery may cost little when broken down by monthly cost and
    > that is true BUT try to find a new laptop battery for a 5 year old
    > machine. Good luck finding one that won't require a home equity loan.

    (a) I had no trouble finding one for my 5 year old laptop and
    (b) what are you running on that 5 year old machine anyway?

    --
    --John
    Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  19. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message news:<coah3j01lt2@news2.newsguy.com>...
    > ;-p wrote:
    >
    > > "Howard Kaikow" <kaikow@standards.com> wrote in message
    > > news:<co7qcg$j2k$1@pyrite.mv.net>...
    > >> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
    > >> news:co7nf332r8j@news3.newsguy.com...
    > >> > Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    > >> > laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery
    > >> > replacement
    > >> > for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.
    > >>
    > >> A UPS battery lasts for several years and is likely less expensive than a
    > >> notebook battery.
    > >>
    > >> However, won;t running without the notebook battery cause the notebook
    > >> battery to discharge?
    > >> If left out long enough, you might not even be able to recharge the
    > >> notebook battery.
    > >
    > > The point is---take care of your battery. There is a need to discharge
    > > and recharge from time to time. Earlier posts suggest that a new
    > > laptop battery may cost little when broken down by monthly cost and
    > > that is true BUT try to find a new laptop battery for a 5 year old
    > > machine. Good luck finding one that won't require a home equity loan.
    >
    > (a) I had no trouble finding one for my 5 year old laptop and
    > (b) what are you running on that 5 year old machine anyway?

    I find no problem using a 5 yr old laptop actually it's 6. A Fujitsu P
    II 233. Has Win98 and everything I use and still does it well. Not
    everyone needs or wants the latest or greatest. I did find a
    replacement battery finially at a decent price. I now take much better
    care of the battery and remove it when used as a desktop.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Re:
    >
    > Now how is it that the UPS battery will hold up in this service but the
    > laptop battery won't? Seems to me you're trading one battery replacement
    > for another. And it all strikes me as cheap for the sake of cheap.
    >

    First, the UPS battery is lead-acid, the laptop battery is lithium ion.
    They have completely and totally different chemistries and
    characteristics. The lead-acid battery will last for several years in
    this type of service.

    Second, the UPS battery costs about $12, while the Laptop battery costs
    over $200. So if you were "trading one battery replacement for
    another", that's still perfectly fine. Note, however, while the
    capacities of the two batteries are the same, the lead-acid battery
    weighs about 10x more than than the Lithium battery. In fact, when
    replacing the lead-acid battery, the shipping cost can be more than the
    cost of the battery itself.

    All batteries are no more similar than are all cars; a Yugo and a Lexus
    are not comparable.
  21. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    Re:


    >
    > However, won;t running without the notebook battery cause the notebook
    > battery to discharge?
    > If left out long enough, you might not even be able to recharge the notebook
    > battery.
    >

    Not really a concern. The battery can be put back into the notebook and
    "topped off" every 90 to 120 days (which will probably happen by itself
    if the notebook ever does any actual travling involving portable
    operation). Some sites recommend that Lithium batteries are best stored
    at 40% to 60% charge, others say full charge, with "top off" at about 90
    to 120 days.

    However, there was a thousands-of-posts long thread on this subject
    [here] about 18 months ago, and the overwhelming consensus of actual
    users was that leaving the battery in the laptop will essentially
    destroy it in 6 to 18 months, while many Lithium batteries that do not
    experience such use will last the better part of a decade (I have not
    one but several Toshiba "2487" lithium batteries made in 1997 that are
    still in good enough condition to run a laptop for 2 hours).
  22. Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

    mha@TheWorld.com (Martha H Adams) wrote:

    >Namely, seems to me it makes *lots* of sense to run your laptop from a
    >UPS, no battery, if it's going to be in one place for a while.

    Pardon if I jump in here, I just joined this ng.

    With regards to your battery question I'd like to point out that it's
    not only a battery issue. Some laptops, especially older designs, use
    the battery as sort of a regulator! It stabilizes the voltage coming
    in from the external source connector.

    If a battery is out of the laptop, the voltage could possibly exceed
    some design criteria.

    Bottom line - it depends on how the laptop was designed.

    Just my past experience ...

    -=tom=-
Ask a new question

Read More

Laptops Battery Hewlett Packard