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Rig fried along with networking components.. power surge OVER ETHERNET

Last response: in Components
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September 18, 2010 2:00:17 PM

Hello, I recently had a bit of a problem and I am lost as to what to make of it.
First of all, here is a list of my devices. 1 Dell Desktop PC (on surge protector), 1 Netgear router(on surge protector), 2 d-link switches(plugged straight to wall), 1 d-link print server(on surge protector), 1 HP network printer(plugged straight to wall), 1 custom built PC(on UPS), 1 cable modem / VoIP box(on surge protector), and a Slingbox(plugged straight to wall).
The custom PC is connected to a switch. The other device on that switch is my network printer. Then an ethernet cable leaves that switch, goes through a wall jack, to another switch. On that switch is the slingbox. The cable then leaves the second switch for the basement where it is connected to the wireless router, and therefore to the cable modem/VoIP box.
Yesterday a very powerful thunderstorm went through the area. I unplugged the custom built PC before the storm hit (I didn't think to un hook the other things) it was hooked up to a UPS and I unhooked it by unplugging the UPS from the wall and turning it off. A large lightning bolt hit somewhere very close to the house, but we do not know if it hit OUR house.
Both switches, the printer, the slingbox, the router, the cable modem, the UPS, and my custom PC are dead. none of them turn on or function in any way. My best guess is that the power surge traveled through the ethernet line (I have no ethernet protectors, have never thought that I would need them)

1. Would the UPS warranty cover my PC even though it was unplugged? I have read the warranty information and it is confusing, is there anyone with experience? The company is CyberPower. I also am concerned because I don't know how they would value the PC. I got many of the parts on special, but to replace it now, it would probably be over $1,000. I also don't know what they would say would need replaced (certainly the case is still ok, as well as CPU fans, etc.)
2. Where would you start in trying to fix the PC in this situation? My first thought would be the motherboard because if the ethernet port got the shock, it would fry the board first right? I am worried that it could have passed into the ram, power supply, or CPU (it is an i7, so quite expensive). The cheapest part to replace is the power supply. Like I said, the UPS is dead, so it seems like the charge came out of the computer via the AC line.

I am aware that this whole situation sounds impossible... but it is the only logical conclusion because of the devices affected. Oh, and the power never went out to anything in the house, and no light bulbs blew out. I am just curious, being an EE student, if something like this is possible and what the chances are. Or, moreso, what a more likely explanation is.
a c 694 ) Power supply
September 18, 2010 2:22:46 PM

Power spikes can travel through network cables but i am curious about the UPS being dead. That would be a spike through the network motherboard and PSU. This may sound like a stupid question but did you check if there is power on the wall sockets?
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September 27, 2010 11:50:47 PM

rolli59 said:
Power spikes can travel through network cables but i am curious about the UPS being dead. That would be a spike through the network motherboard and PSU. This may sound like a stupid question but did you check if there is power on the wall sockets?

I did check the power at the wall and it is fine. I tried plugging the PC into different outlets and it still didn't work. I ended up replacing the motherboard and it works fine now. I don't know how the UPS got fried, but the bottom line is I tried it on different outlets and, it too, did not turn on.
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