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Does the p4m800pro-m478 motherboard need dual channel ram to see the full 2 gig

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April 29, 2011 3:16:13 PM

I have this motherboard p4m800pro-m478 in an old e-machine. It's running ok but slow, more so than it could be. I bought a set of VS1GB533D2 corsair (2 gig =2 of the 1gig sticks) from newegg and put it in and it is only seeing half of the ram. Does the motherboard have to have (dual channel) or can I just keep it the way it is with the new ram and do something to the bios to get it to see the full 2 gig. remembering that this mthrboard can take or SDRAM DDR 400 (PC 3200) (((((it cam with 256mb of this)))) or DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 533 (PC2 4200) VS1GB533D2 corsair (((((this is what is only being seen as half there))))). I also do not know how to change the bios. I am also running XP SP3. Please help???
a b } Memory
a c 108 V Motherboard
April 29, 2011 7:47:38 PM

If you have the manual, check it to make sure you're populating the correct slots for a two-stick configuration. No motherboard requires dual channel to be enabled; it just happens as a result of occupying the correct DIMM slots with RAM of the same density. Take a look at this diagram:

CPU: | _ | _ if this is how your manual instructs you to install RAM, then dual channel would automatically be enabled.

Where did you see that you're only using 1GB of RAM?
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April 30, 2011 12:07:16 AM

T_T said:
If you have the manual, check it to make sure you're populating the correct slots for a two-stick configuration. No motherboard requires dual channel to be enabled; it just happens as a result of occupying the correct DIMM slots with RAM of the same density. Take a look at this diagram:

CPU: | _ | _ if this is how your manual instructs you to install RAM, then dual channel would automatically be enabled.

Where did you see that you're only using 1GB of RAM?



to your ? about the diagram link, it did not come through, to your second ? it was in the control pannel that I saw only 1 gig. I had a talk with (kingston tech support) this was one of two ram brands that the owners manual said would be accepted by this motherboard), and he said that this MB was not designed to take high density ram. Does this sound reasonable, and if I put (2) 1x1g 184-Pin DDR SDRAM DDR 400 (PC 3200) supposed non-high density in place of (2) 1x1g DDR2 533 (PC2 4200) that is only running half the memory, Would the 400 run slower, just as fast, or faster than the 533 if the 400 was seen as 2gb and the 533 was onl 1gb?
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a b } Memory
a c 108 V Motherboard
April 30, 2011 12:35:41 AM

The density refers to the amount of GB. So, with the sticks of RAM that you've been trying to use, you have 2GB density. The tech support's analysis is incorrect. According to the ECS website: http://www.ecs.com.tw/ECSWebSite_2007/Products/Products...
your motherboard can support up to 2GB.

And according to your manual:

"This motherboard accomodates four memory modules. It can support two 184-pin unbuffered DIMM, DDR 400/333/266 or two 240-pin DDR2 533/400. The total memory support capacity is 2 GB.

You must install at least one module in any of the four slots. Each module can be installed with 256 MB to 1 GB of memory; total support memory capacity is 2 GB.

Users please note that DDR & DDR2 can’t both be applied at the same time on
this motherboard. Users can use either DDR or DDR2 memory modules only!"

When it comes to dual channel, there is only about a 5% increase in performance. However, since we're comparing DDR 400 to DDR2 533, then the DDR 400 kit would run slower. DDR2 is double that of DDR, and on top of that the DDR2 kit can operate at a higher frequency (533 MHz), so if comparing the RAM sticks by themselves, the DDR2 is certainly faster. Though DDR2 is faster than DDR, density does matter. Simply put, if you don't have enough memory (RAM) as a resource, your computer will run slow. So, if you have a kit of DDR2 533 RAM, use it.

Getting back to the problem at hand... Please ensure that you're not mixing your RAM. By mixing I mean:

1. Not using DDR with DDR2
2. Neither the DDR sticks nor the DDR2 sticks are mismatched density, voltage, and/or timing
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a c 80 } Memory
a c 229 V Motherboard
April 30, 2011 12:56:05 AM

Tech support might be correct. How many chips on each module? 8 (high density) or 16 (low density)? High density modules are less expensive, but they are not compatible with all older motherboards.
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April 30, 2011 12:21:31 PM

T_T said:
If you have the manual, check it to make sure you're populating the correct slots for a two-stick configuration. No motherboard requires dual channel to be enabled; it just happens as a result of occupying the correct DIMM slots with RAM of the same density. Take a look at this diagram:

CPU: | _ | _ if this is how your manual instructs you to install RAM, then dual channel would automatically be enabled.

Where did you see that you're only using 1GB of RAM?


Just FYI, the only ram that I have for this machine is the 256 that it came with and the 2 pack of ram ((((2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 533 (PC2 4200) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model VS2GBKIT533D2))))
that I am trying to get he full 2 gig's out of ((http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...))

Ok, so what I am hearing you say is that I am likely better off just staying with the ddr2 and trying somehow to loosen up the other gig by changing the bios that I don't even know where to look OR just simply be satisfied with what I have beacause the ddr is slower? that's kinda it in a nut shell isn't it.....and if so where do I go in the startup to find the right bios's to change? I have found the #'s for the ram of (4-4-4-12-2t) but where do I find the screen to change those #'s. when I start the computer I push either tab or delete one of those 2 and from there.....I am lost. By the way you people are rockin for helping others out like this.
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April 30, 2011 12:24:05 PM

GhislainG said:
Tech support might be correct. How many chips on each module? 8 (high density) or 16 (low density)? High density modules are less expensive, but they are not compatible with all older motherboards.




GhislainG, In answer to your comment these new modules have 8 on one side not 16 total. Jeff
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a c 80 } Memory
a c 229 V Motherboard
April 30, 2011 1:12:02 PM

Based on their cost and the number of chips, they probably are high density modules. I checked the Corsair site and no ECS motherboard is in the list of compatible motherboards. The Transcend TS128MLQ64V5J module should be compatible, but it costs quite a bit more

The least expensive modules might be http://www.memoryupgradecompany.com/memoryupgradedetail..., but they don't specify the manufacturer.
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April 30, 2011 9:39:29 PM

Hey I really, really thank you and T_T for all of your help. I think that I have come down to the conclusion that I am going to do one of the system scans that is on the same site as the ram that you pointed out to see what they think of the motherboard and the modules that I currently have and then make a decision to either buy those that you GhislainG pointed out or just leave it how it is. thanks again both of you. Jeff
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