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DDR2 vs DDR3

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July 21, 2010 4:45:45 AM

I'm building my first gaming computer, and though it took me a while, I got what seemed to be a fairly good setup. However I don't receive all the money I will be using for the computer until a month from this date, so I'm attempting at borrowing parts. Which would result in the possibility of my using DDR2 rather than DDR3.

The main problem was in a motherboard that supported the Phenom II X4 BE that was in a reasonable price range (ultimately the cheapest), so I chose this one.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

However, I was wondering what the difference between DDR2 and DDR3 is, as I was thinking about getting this instead, because of the combo with the power supply I wanted:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I suppose I had a laced, second question, about whether or not those mobos wouldn't work well enough for my processor and video card:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
But that's probably irrelevant.
Thanks for any replies.

More about : ddr2 ddr3

July 21, 2010 5:00:39 AM

well the difference is speed, which dd3 are clocked higher so will have higher memory bandwidth, and ddr3 uses less power i believe, in real word apps doens't make too much of a difference, unless your using a program that relies heavily memory, so if you can save a pretty significant amount of money then it's no problem

and for your 2nd question, yes both will work for you cpu
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July 21, 2010 5:12:21 AM

I'm not sure of the rules on whether or not expanding the subject is legal or not, but do either of those motherboard choices make any difference as to the noticeable speed in gaming? I don't plan on playing a whole lot, but I'd like to keep my options open for anything in the future.

Thanks a lot, btw.
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July 21, 2010 5:19:26 AM

no not really your mobo really determines how man expansion slots at your disoposal and other connectivity options, such as usb 3.0 sata 6gb/s, firewire,

so if your going with a single card you'll be fine, because it'll be at x16. now if you want to CF or SLi then your mobo matters. the only other thing that would potentially effect performance, is cpu overclocking potentail, but it's really a marginal thing, a super high end mobo might allow you an extra 5% overclock
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August 1, 2010 4:32:21 AM

Sorry I wasn't able to reply for a while, my job kind of got in the way.

Well, I decided to go with ddr3, this stuff from g.skill: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
However, I'm having problems with it. My motherboard does not allow me to boot the computer with the timings and 1600mhz it gives on the site (it just repeats the bios intro, and restarts). I don't know whole lot about timings, and I'm considering taking it back since this site said the mobo doesn't accept 1600mhz ram very well. (it does start up, but only with the advertised timings at 1333mhz... which did not boost my Windows 7 Pro score from 5.9 to anything after updating the timings)
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-785g-motherboar...
I'm really wondering whether or not to take my ram back or not.. or maybe my motherboard? Whichever is better, I suppose.

Should I OC it to tighter timings or return the ram for something else? I'm running a Phenom II X4 965 BE, btw... which is underclocked by .1 ghz by default(rolls eyes), oh well.
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August 1, 2010 4:59:39 AM

You could try running at tighter timings than advertised. Actually nab CPU-z and it will tell you what the timings are for each speed. And really 1600 RAM isn't really needed. The 1333 is usually a good place to be. I mean, you can return it but then if it's your mobo being the problem you'd just have to buy something else.
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August 1, 2010 5:30:25 AM

UPDATE: I was able to get the RAM to run at 1600 and with the timings 9-9-9-24 (it has -24n at the end on the ad, but not sure what that means)
except, the rating in windows hasn't gone up at all.... o.o I don't get it.
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August 1, 2010 5:46:38 AM

only at 809mhz do the timings change from 9-8 on the first three numbers.
2 things I noticed though
1. it says I'm running at 667mhz, and I could go to 800mhz and that would qualify as "XMP-1600"? I'm a total newb, sorry.

and 2. It prevails that my fsb:D ram is 1:4? I do remember something about 1:1 and how it would boost your system. If so, how could I find out about doing it?
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August 1, 2010 6:17:22 AM

if your looking at something like cpu-z with at 667 or 800mhz you need to double that, and that's your actual speed. Personally not really sure what xmp does, other then i think it's suppose to set itself up

as for your second question, 1:4 fsb ram is the ratio, so your ram is running 4 times faster then your fsb or base clock, if it was at 1:1 it would be the exact same clock as your fsb, which will be slower so really it would cripple your system
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August 1, 2010 6:43:11 AM

Do you know why it would receive only a 5.9 in windows 7 experience rating, though? On newegg, others received a 7.1 with the same product. Do I just need to change out my motherboard?
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August 1, 2010 1:19:59 PM

no u need more ram to get a higher score in windows 7
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