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How to manually set RAM voltage and timings?

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a b V Motherboard
May 3, 2011 7:17:37 PM

Hello!


I recently put a new sig togeather and at first everything seeemed to be fine, however the computer began to fail at boot-up (looping on and off).

After contacting Gigabyte about the issue, I was told that it may be the RAM timings are not set correctly. After messing around in BIOS I noticed he was right, the modules are operating at 1.5v (9-9-9-24) instead of the advertised 1.65v (9-9-9-27).

The issue with this is.....I havnt the slightest clue when it comes to setting the proper voltage and timings and anything else changing said options would require.

Perhaps someone more familiar could help me out?

My specs are as follows

MOBO: Gigabyte p67a UD7 B3
CPU: Intel i7 2600K
RAM: Kingston HyperX Genesis Grey edition 8GB (KHX1600C9D3X2K2/8GX)
GPU: HIS 6850
PSU: Seasonic X750 Gold
a b V Motherboard
May 4, 2011 4:06:17 AM

Don't set your voltage to 1.65V on a sandy bridge motherboard! 1.5V 9-9-9-24 is what you want.
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May 4, 2011 7:31:56 AM

To get high performance at low power consumption and low tempt. set XMP.
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a b V Motherboard
May 4, 2011 10:22:15 AM

crewton said:
Don't set your voltage to 1.65V on a sandy bridge motherboard! 1.5V 9-9-9-24 is what you want.
This is incorrect. 1.65v RAM is allowable on Sandy Bridge motherboards
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a b V Motherboard
May 4, 2011 8:26:02 PM

1.5v ram is what you want for P67. You can use 1.65v ram however, but I wouldn't recommend that if your overclocking at all. Anything over 1.65v can damage the cpu.

I'm using 1.65v ram, and it booted at 1.65, but I set it to 1.5v.

I have : 1600mhz/1.65v/9-9-9-24

I have it set to: 1333mhz/1.50v/8-8-8-24

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a c 716 V Motherboard
May 4, 2011 10:17:24 PM

If you go strictly on Intel spec voltage then an most CPU OC would be impossible. DRAM Voltage up to 1.575v is 100% within spec.

After putting my nose into Intel's CPU manuals the LGA 1156, LGA 1366 {i7-900, i7-800, & i5-700} and LGA 1155 {i7, i5 and i3} ALL had the SAME "DDR3 I/O Voltage of 1.5 V" and SAME DRAM Voltage up to 1.575v.

Therefore, this is all becoming more and more 'Urban Myth' that 1.65v RAM is 'bad' for the Sandy Bridge. The move towards 1.50v RAM is due of the improve RAM IC's which require less voltage to operate at faster frequencies i.e. 1600 MHz+. The only voltage that is bad is the difference between 'DRAM Voltage' and QPI/VTT/VCCIO which ideally 0.30v-0.50v.
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a b V Motherboard
May 4, 2011 11:36:07 PM

If his RAM was stable at 1.5V 9-9-9-24 timings, I would leave it put. There really is no point in damaging your cpu just to put the voltage up to 1.65V. As jaquith said the DRAM voltage needs to be within .5V of VCCIO. Unless you plan on raising your VCCIO higher than the default of 1.1V you can't put your DRAM at 1.65V. Since the OP was unsure of how to raise the ram voltage I doubt he'd want to go in there and start messing with CPU voltages as well.

Now if your computer is failing to start up due to your ram being undervolted then raise it up until it becomes stable.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 1:14:41 AM

The 'DRAM Voltage' and QPI/VTT/VCCIO specs are ALL the same here again. The differences are the safe values: VCCIO of 1.20v and QPI/VTT of 1.35v; therefore, 1.65v RAM is fine.

Example, there are kits like F3-17000CL8D-4GBXMD that are specifically designed for Sandy Bridge and are 1.65v.

"IF" 1.65v RAM runs without errors, test with Memtest than assume, then cool use 1.5~1.6v.

I probably should edit my prior post to remove grammatical errors - this happens when I blaze through a post...like now.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 1:36:30 AM

Manufacturers would not be making 1.65v RAM specifically for Sandy Bridge if it were not fully within Intel's tolerances. To do otherwise would be to risk massive lawsuits and a permanently sullied reputation - and the demise of a multi-billion dollar company to follow.
This stuff is littered across the vendors - this is but a small sample:

Patriot Gamer 2 Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PGD34G1600ELK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(2 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Gamer 2 Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PGD38G1600ELK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(15 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Viper Xtreme Series, Division 2 Edition 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PXD38G1600LLK
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Viper Xtreme Series, Division 2 Edition 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PXD34G1600LLK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(1 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

1.65v RAM is fine for Sandy Bridge!
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 3:33:24 AM

Best answer selected by DoomsWord89.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 2:06:13 PM

Noworldorder said:
Manufacturers would not be making 1.65v RAM specifically for Sandy Bridge if it were not fully within Intel's tolerances. To do otherwise would be to risk massive lawsuits and a permanently sullied reputation - and the demise of a multi-billion dollar company to follow.
This stuff is littered across the vendors - this is but a small sample:

Patriot Gamer 2 Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PGD34G1600ELK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(2 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Gamer 2 Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PGD38G1600ELK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(15 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Viper Xtreme Series, Division 2 Edition 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PXD38G1600LLK
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Patriot Viper Xtreme Series, Division 2 Edition 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PXD34G1600LLK
Average Rating 5 out of 5 eggs5/5(1 reviews)
Intel P67 platform/ XMP ready
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

1.65v RAM is fine for Sandy Bridge!


Nobody said 1.65v was not ok for SB, so not sure why you need to use GIANT PINK LETTERS.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011/01/07/how-to...

As with LGA1366 and LGA1156 CPUs, keep this value to within 0.5V of the VCCIO voltage to prevent long term damage to the CPU. By default, this is 1.1V, which means the 1.65V used by previous Intel DDR3 memory is still acceptable. However, more recent memory will be rated at 1.5V (or even 1.35V if you choose a low-voltage kit). Increasing the VCCIO voltage obviously gives you more overhead on your memory voltage (remember, add +0.5V at most or risk damaging your CPU).

IMO, take your 1.65v memory and run it at 1.5v by lowering the speed and tightening the timings will result in same or better performance anyways. This is how I'm running my Corsair XMS3. 1.65v/1600/9-9-9-24 running at 1.5v/1333/8-8-8-20.


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a c 716 V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 2:57:36 PM

Truth be said, I see a lot more 'problems' with 1.50V RAM + SB. The link essentially says what I've stated, I too read both sets of Intel specs. I bought into the 1.65 'bad' until logic and documentation proved otherwise.

IMO - this all seems to be a Mythbusters 'Urban Myth'. The lithography improvement in RAM production is root for lower power & efficient RAM. People put these two together and wild assumptions became truth.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 4:10:11 PM

Well seeing as after I set the RAM to proper voltage (1.65) and timings (9-9-9-27) the system no longer loops and passed several cycles of memtest and prime, I would say I am certainly better off.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 4:34:36 PM

You would be better off at 1.5v/1333/8-8-8-20, but that's just my opinion.

I've not seen even one, out of hundreds of P67/H67/H61 that has a problem with 1.5v ram if the timings and speed is manually set correctly. Nor have I seen a single problem with 1.65v ram if the speed and timings are manually set correctly. However, Intel still recommends 1.6v max. Only time will tell if these overclockers start having cpu failures.

I'm not going to argue with a bunch of fanboys that think they know more than Intel.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 4:36:51 PM

geekapproved said:
Nobody said 1.65v was not ok for SB, so not sure why you need to use GIANT PINK LETTERS.

crewton said:
Don't set your voltage to 1.65V on a sandy bridge motherboard! 1.5V 9-9-9-24 is what you want.
Yes, they did, which is what 40% of the posts in this thread had been about. As usual, sadly, you did not read the thread.
I will use any size or or color lettering permitted by the forum. It does not affect you, and you are welcome to ignore it.
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a b V Motherboard
May 5, 2011 5:11:15 PM

geekapproved said:
You would be better off at 1.5v/1333/8-8-8-20, but that's just my opinion.

I've not seen even one, out of hundreds of P67/H67/H61 that has a problem with 1.5v ram if the timings and speed is manually set correctly. Nor have I seen a single problem with 1.65v ram if the speed and timings are manually set correctly. However, Intel still recommends 1.6v max. Only time will tell if these overclockers start having cpu failures.

I'm not going to argue with a bunch of fanboys that think they know more than Intel.


Seeing as the rig would loop on any other voltage or timings, I would have to disagree that I would be better off.

I am better off with a computer that operates properly.
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a c 716 V Motherboard
May 6, 2011 1:18:48 PM

1.5v/1333/8-8-8-20 vs 1.65v/1600/9-9-9-24 AND Sandy Bridge:

For Gaming, Multi-Tasking, etc the 1600 CAS 9 is superior -> http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

In theory the 1600 CAS 9 is also superior, and in 'this' instance 1.65v is superior.

Theoretical Frequency & CAS:
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June 21, 2012 10:06:02 PM

Sorry for popping out so suddenly on someone else post, but you guys seems to know what you're talking about. I have a question : I bought a 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 RAM kit of 1333Mhz. Its the Kingston HyperX model. I also bought the Intel Core i3-2120 CPU. Some people say the two aren't compatible since the RAM is made to be run at 1.65 volt and this CPU supports 1.5 volt or less. A lot of people have been telling me that the two pieces aren't compatible and that the RAM would actually damage my CPU over time. It would litteraly ''fry''. But can't the DDR3 RAM be set to work at 1.5 volt so it would work nicely with the core i3 CPU? Or is too much of an overkill and it's too risky?

Thank you for your time!
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a b V Motherboard
June 21, 2012 11:05:02 PM

ClownWalker said:
I bought a 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 RAM kit of 1333Mhz. Its the Kingston HyperX model. I also bought the Intel Core i3-2120 CPU. the RAM is made to be run at 1.65 volt and this CPU supports 1.5 volt or less. A lot of people have been telling me that the two pieces aren't compatible and that the RAM would actually damage my CPU over time. It would litteraly ''fry''. But can't the DDR3 RAM be set to work at 1.5 volt so it would work nicely with the core i3 CPU? Or is too much of an overkill and it's too risky?
The RAM you have will not harm your CPU. It will not harm your motherboard. The worst that can happen is the RAM may not be compatible with the motherboard - in which case it will either not function at all or may give timing errors. Both of which are very small percentages.
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a c 328 V Motherboard
June 22, 2012 12:10:47 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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