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Final thoughts before I buy/Build

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: (7/22/10-7/29/10)

BUDGET RANGE: 1000

SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: gaming, surfing the internet, watching movies

PARTS NOT REQUIRED: Keyboard, Mouse, Monitor, speakers

PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: Newegg, Fry's(very close to house)

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: USA

PARTS PREFERENCES: Gonna go the AMD route unless convinced other wise.

OVERCLOCKING: No, need more experience

SLI OR CROSSFIRE: No, need more experience

MONITOR RESOLUTION: 1680x1050 22in HP

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: I'm one of those who needs a bad ass case to look at. Don't mind paying a little extra for it.

CPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103808
Mobo - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128416&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-RSSDailyDeals-_-na-_-na&AID=10521304&PID=3463938&SID=
PSU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171036
GPU/Win 7 combo - http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.437534.14-102-858&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-RSSDailyDeals-_-na-_-na&AID=10521304&PID=3463938&SID=
Ram - http://www.dpbolvw.net/click-3463938-10521304?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newegg.com%2FProduct%2FProduct.aspx%3FItem%3DN82E16820231190
HDD - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136284
DVD - http://www.dpbolvw.net/click-3463938-10521304?URL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.newegg.com%2FProduct%2FProduct.aspx%3FItem%3DN82E16827151176
Heat Sink- http://www.newegg.com/Product/NewProduct.aspx?Item=N82E16835185142&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-RSSDailyDeals-_-na-_-na&AID=10521304&PID=3463938&SID=
Case - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119212 or http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119225&cm_re=haf_x-_-11-119-225-_-Product
38 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about final thoughts build
  1. W/ Haf 932 I'm at 989.90
    W/ Haf X I'm at 1039.99

    And suggestions where I can put the extra money W/ either case?
  2. With a budget as high as yours, it's a little silly to stick with AMD. Once you're looking at spending over about $800 on your computer, it's often better to go with Intel as their CPUs at higher price ranges offer better performance, hands down, than AMD's, as they don't have any products which compete with Intel's higher end stuff. So, here's what I propose:

    CPU: Intel Core i7 930 - a 2.8GHz quad core. It's faster than the higher clocked Phenom 965 though, due to its great architecture. $289.99

    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R - the name just rolls off your tongue :D It supports your CPU, up to 24 gigs of RAM at high speeds, two graphics cards at x16 so that you can add another one in the future and USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s to be forward thinking. $209.99

    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws 6GB (3x2GB) 2000MHz Kit - super fast 6GB triple channel kit. More than enough capacity and speed for a few years. When you need more, you can just buy another one of these kits! $174.99

    Graphics card: Palit GTX 460 1GB - a very fast graphics card which has very good scaling in SLI so that in the future, when you do feel that you have the experience, you can buy another one of these and run it alongside your current one. You don't really need any experience anyway; it's just like fitting a single graphics card except that you connect a bridge connector. $229.99

    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB - high capacity, fast, reliable drive. $74.99

    Optical Drive - Lite-On 24x DVD burner - supports burning and reading of all DVD formats at high speed. $17.99

    PSU: Cooler Master GX Series 650W - nice reliable PSU which provides enough power for your system. In a combo with the case. $139.97 in combo.

    Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 - in my opinion this is the most badass looking case money can buy. It's got very good cooling as well, with its 200mm fans. $139.97 in combo

    So there you have it. Take it or leave it, that's my build suggestion for the money. Of course, if you really really don't want to go with Intel then you could get the 965 (might as well pay a bit more for it) and an AM3 motherboard, and 4 gigs of dual channel memory. That would put the price down a lot, but also the performance. What you have there is more powerful than any AMD computer when it comes to games.
  3. Looks good - will be nice for gaming and things now and give you the option of upgrading to crossfire 5770s in the future. If you don't plan on doing that ever, you could go for a smaller PSU and a cheaper motherboard...
  4. Anonymous said:
    With a budget as high as yours, it's a little silly to stick with AMD. Once you're looking at spending over about $800 on your computer, it's often better to go with Intel as their CPUs at higher price ranges offer better performance, hands down, than AMD's, as they don't have any products which compete with Intel's higher end stuff. So, here's what I propose:

    CPU: Intel Core i7 930 - a 2.8GHz quad core. It's faster than the higher clocked Phenom 965 though, due to its great architecture. $289.99

    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R - the name just rolls off your tongue :D It supports your CPU, up to 24 gigs of RAM at high speeds, two graphics cards at x16 so that you can add another one in the future and USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s to be forward thinking. $209.99

    RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws 6GB (3x2GB) 2000MHz Kit - super fast 6GB triple channel kit. More than enough capacity and speed for a few years. When you need more, you can just buy another one of these kits! $174.99

    Graphics card: Palit GTX 460 1GB - a very fast graphics card which has very good scaling in SLI so that in the future, when you do feel that you have the experience, you can buy another one of these and run it alongside your current one. You don't really need any experience anyway; it's just like fitting a single graphics card except that you connect a bridge connector. $229.99

    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB - high capacity, fast, reliable drive. $74.99

    Optical Drive - Lite-On 24x DVD burner - supports burning and reading of all DVD formats at high speed. $17.99

    PSU: Cooler Master GX Series 650W - nice reliable PSU which provides enough power for your system. In a combo with the case. $139.97 in combo.

    Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 - in my opinion this is the most badass looking case money can buy. It's got very good cooling as well, with its 200mm fans. $139.97 in combo

    So there you have it. Take it or leave it, that's my build suggestion for the money. Of course, if you really really don't want to go with Intel then you could get the 965 (might as well pay a bit more for it) and an AM3 motherboard, and 4 gigs of dual channel memory. That would put the price down a lot, but also the performance. What you have there is more powerful than any AMD computer when it comes to games.


    Sorry man I thought I put 1000 for Budget not 1200. Fix'd
  5. I'll edit this post in a minute to give you the best deal for $1000 instead of $1200. As for your build, everything looks good apart from the hard drive, heat sink and case. The hard drive is a "Caviar Black" which is a performance drive but barely offers any performance over the Caviar Blue. It's hotter and noisier though, so I'd say get the Caviar Blue 1TB. You don't need the heat sink at all unless you plan on doing medium/heavy overclocking. Your CPU comes with a heat sink which is fine for running at stock speeds or slightly overclocked. As for the case, the 932 is a full tower, and there's no point getting one of those unless you need loads of room for hard drives and optical drives. the HAF X is an extended ATX form factor, which is even bigger. Again, no point. Get the HAF 922. It's got plenty of space :)
  6. Actually, for gaming i7 CPU's offer no benefit over Phenom II x4 of i5-750.

    You're paying a ton more money for useless threads.
    The only exception is a build where you plan on using 3 or more GPU's, in which case the i5-750 is out, but Phenom II x4 is still fine.

    The CM GX is actually a horrible PSU. The ripple in particular is nearly as bad as a cheap $20 700w PSU.
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story5&reid=188

    RAm wise, you're better off with a G Skill Pi 6gb kit, or if you want 2000mhz RAM, the G SKill trident 2000 6gb kit.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231254&cm_re=trident-_-20-231-254-_-Product
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231335&cm_re=pi_6gb-_-20-231-335-_-Product

    If you stick with a scythe mugen though, you'll need a RAM kit w/o heat spreaders, so this Corsair kit would work. The mugen blocks 2 RAM slots due to size.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145286

    You could just go with a $30 Cm Hyper 212 Plus which blocks none, or a Megahalem which blocks only 1 (you can still install 3 RAM DImms this way)

    Caviar Blue HD performance is pretty horrendous. Those things are old and slow.
    Best bang for buck atm is Spinpoint F3. Better performance than that WD 1tb for less money.

    Look for combo deals, you can save a lot that way.

    For $1200, you can do a Phenom II x4 955 + 5870 + 23" 1920 x 1080 LCD. I'll throw together a build in a bit.
  7. He made a mistake originally. He is looking for a build for $1000.

    Therefore, here's mine:

    CPU: Intel Core i7-860 - a 2.8GHz quad core. It's faster than the higher clocked Phenom 965 though, due to its great architecture. Uses a different socket to the i7-930 and isn't as powerful but it means you can save on the RAM and motherboard. $289.99

    Motherboard: ASRock H55DE3 LGA 1156 - It's reasonably cheap but it supports everything you need and so there aren't many reasons to pay more money for one. $89.99

    RAM: GeIL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 1600MHz Kit - fast 4GB dual channel kit. Enough capacity and speed for a few years. When you need more, you can just buy another one of these kits! $86.99

    Graphics card: Palit GTX 460 1GB - Same as before. $229.99

    Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB - Same as before. $74.99

    Optical Drive - Lite-On 24x DVD burner - Same as before. $17.99

    PSU: Cooler Master GX Series 650W - Same as before. $139.97 in combo.

    Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 -Same as before. $139.97 in combo

    There, my edited build. Comes to $999.91 which brings you just into your budget. Again, better for gaming than any AMD computer.
  8. As I said above, the Caviar blues perform poorly. For same Price a 1tb spinpoint F3 is much better performance.

    Comparison of wd black WD1001FALS vs f3. Copy paste, as it doesn't link properly
    F3 on left, wd black on right

    tomshardware.com/charts/2009-3.5-desktop-hard-drive-charts/compare,1013.html?prod[3016]=on∏[2365]=on

    Asrock is a budget board company, not the highest quality. Further, that mobo can not xfire in the future and does not have sata 6/usb3.

    Also as noted above, the CM GX series PSU's are horrible. Do not use them.

    In addition dangerman, you forgot the OS.


    $1,000 Phenom II x4+5850 build

    HD
    F3 500gb $55
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152181

    PSU
    XFX 750w $105 w/ $20 MIR
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207003
    Top rated PSU on jonny guru. 9.7 vs 7 for the GX series.
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&file=print&reid=184

    RAM
    G SKill Eco DDR3 1600 7-8-7-24 @ 1.35v $105
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231321
    Low voltage, tight timings excellent OC ability.

    Case/Optical
    CM 690 and Samsung $73
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.435592
    Case isn't as nice as the HAF 922, but it's still roomy and nice to work with.

    GPU/CPU
    XFX 5850 and Phenom II x4 955 $425
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.432367

    MOBO/OS
    GA 790 UD4 and win 7 oem 64 bit $230 w/ $15 MIR $230
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.437524.13-128-416

    Total: $993 before shipping and $35 rebates

    If you're a student you can save some money w/ $30 win 7 pro offer
    http://www.microsoft.com/student/en/us/software/windows.aspx

    You can stick with the HAF 922 with a cheap optical if you want, but it'll be ~$45 more
  9. Gaming in general is GPU not CPU bound.
    Even with a 5970, an i7-920 and a phenom ii x4 perform about the same.
    http://www.legionhardware.com/articles_pages/radeon_hd_5870_crossfire_cpu_scaling_performance_part_1,1.html


    The reason why an i7 cpu is unnecessary for gaming is due to useless threads you're paying for.

    Games are very poorly threaded. The part of gaming that is well
    threaded, the graphics portions, is handled by the GPU, which already
    have hundreds of cores.

    In gaming, the most CPU intensive task is AI. AI, by definition is not
    a parallel process. It is extremely difficult to thread AI. Most games
    that are "multi threaded" actually keep AI on 1 thread and throw the
    rest (minor far less intensive stuff) on the other.

    Can you design a game to utilize 4 or more cores? Sure, you can throw
    all the CPU non intensive calculations onto their own threads, but
    until someone figures out a good way to thread nonparallel
    computations, the performance increase will be minimal, as the hard
    work is still restricted to 1 thread.

    This issue has been stumping programmers for decades. There are ways
    to do this in specific situations, but no general solution yet. A
    general solution allowing infinite threading of nonparallel
    calculations would be the programming equivalent of finding the cure
    for cancer, noble prize stuff for sure.

    Basically think of it this way. On a math exam you have a 3 part
    question in which the answer to part each part depends on previous
    answers. IE

    A. Add up 3 and 5.
    B. Use the answer from part A and divide by 2
    C. Use the answer from part B and triple it.

    what is the final answer?

    This is the type of thinking AI requires. Threading this is the
    equivalent of calculating the answer to A, B and C simultaneously.
    It's not impossible like the mathematical equivalent is, but it's not
    easy.

    For this reason, more than 3 threads has very little benefit.

    Ram wise you want tighter timings.
    AMD architecture favors tighter timings over faster speed for
    performance increase. Intel, favors neither. That said, neither makes
    a significant impact on performance to warrant a major price
    difference.

    CAs latency refers to how long it takes the RAM to do something after
    it's given a command. Makes no difference to FPS in gaming, but like
    an SSD, it improves system responsiveness.

    Stock i7-930 is 133 block, 21 multiplier and 10x memory multiplier.
    Though the latter is determined by MOBO not CPU. This fully saturated
    1333mhz RAM. 133block speed x 10 memory multiplier= 1330.

    To OC above this you'll need to either lower multiplier or get faster RAM.
    In general, we recommend DDR3 1600 RAM if you plan on a OC.

    Now, the reason why we recommend G Skill RAM is that memory can
    perform better than rated speeds. Most companeis sell you RAM that'll
    perform at specs, G SKill tends to give you better than you pay for.
    So their RAM can run at higher speeds, lower voltages and/or lower
    timings than specs. OCZ is the opposite, hence we don't recommend
    them.

    High speeds requires looser timings to work. I'll avoid the
    tech details as to why, but suffice to say this is a mechanically
    imposed limitation. Now, because faster RAM must be of higher quality
    to maintain the same latency as slower RAM, they're generally better
    quality. As a result, the Trident DDR3 2000 kit that's rated at cas 9
    at 2000, can hit CAS 6 at 1600 speeds. CAS 5 at 1333 speeds. This is
    why people will buy extremely fast RAM. They're getting higher quality
    RAM so they can run it at tighter timings for the speeds they want.

    Now as to why 1600 7-8-7-24 kit is better than a 1333 7-7-7-21 kit, is
    because, the 1600 kit can run 7-7-7-21 when under clocked to 1333
    speeds.

    edit: Some cores vs performance in gaming benchmarks demonstrating the lack of performance after 3 cores.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-cores-performance,2373-9.html
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cpu-cores-performance,2373-9.html
  10. Wow. *hides in shame at inferior knowledge*
  11. Don't worry about it dangerman, we're all here to learn.

    I actually end up posting threading and latency explanations every week so I've got it saved up to copy/paste when needed :D
  12. :lol:
    Well that's been pretty useful to me anyway. I knew that the GPU was more important for games but that's now given me a much more in-depth view of it, thanks :)
  13. a build for $942.91 before $20 rebates and is sli capable

    cpu&mobo: x4 955 & asus m498td evo
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.444798

    gpu&os: gtx 460 & win7 ( a gtx 460 will do great for your resoloution and sli isn't hard you know just connect the bridge then get in the nvidia control panel and click enable sli )
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.437534.14-125-333

    psu&case: lancoolpc-k62 & xfx 650 (both r top notch quality)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.440193

    ram: g.skill eco
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231321

    hdd: spinpoint f3 1tb
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152185

    odd: lite on
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106289

    the gtx 460 is the best bang for the buck card out there in some benchmarks it either scores higher or lower than the 5850 and if you sli it it will beat 2 5870's in cf

    edit: changed psu to 650
  14. Good info
  15. Hows this look...I went over my budget a bit but my inner stubbornness says i need the Haf X!

    [url=]
  16. I agree with everything on there apart from the HAF X. I have a feeling you won't be swayed on this one, but I advise you to get the HAF 922 instead.
  17. Anonymous said:
    I agree with everything on there apart from the HAF X. I have a feeling you won't be swayed on this one, but I advise you to get the HAF 922 instead.


    2 reasons - room for my gorilla hands to work in
    and my son loves to push the power button on me so I love the cover feature.
    Plus the room I will have to upgrade my parts later.

    Plus I'm stubborn and i just love the bigness of this bad boy!

    But My wifey said 1g so If I cant sell her on it then Yeah i will go to the 922 or 932!
  18. 1g? huh? lol
  19. Anonymous said:
    1g? huh? lol


    Sorry bro meant 1k lol, as in I got 1000bucks to do this project with. I think because its my first build she doesn't want to see any money wasted.
  20. Oh right :D
  21. so I wont need a after market CPU fan will I since I wont be overclocking or anything?
  22. Things are looking good. I see a 750W PSU in the mix.
    That says to me 2x video cards some where in the future?

    And that GA-790XTA-UD4 is Crossfire (ATI) only - not SLI (Nvidia). So maybe that GTX 460 is a slight mis-match since you can't add a 2nd. And a HD 5770 might be a better match, allowing you to add a 2nd if you ever upgrade your 1680x1050 monitor.

    If you're sticking with the same monitor and want to keep the GTX 460 that works for me too. It's a great video card for the money.

    Single GTX 460 or HD 5770... I think you can go with the 650W model PSU.
  23. I agree with what you've said there, WR2. You can tone down the PSU if you're not going to get dual graphics cards in the future but I wouldn't recommend getting a single 5770 at 1680x1050. I'd say get the 460 or the 5830 if you're going ATI.

    No, you won't need and after market CPU cooler if you're not overclocking.
  24. Or you could just get a 5850 since it fit's in budget fine...

    Price/performance the 460 is the best, but the 5850 is without a doubt a better GPU. The 460 price and performance beats a 5830, but is not a match for a 5850.

    Granted, based on price/performance of a 460, a 5850 should be closer to $260, but by that metric a 480 should be closer to $350.

    Actually, you're probably best off dropping the HAF X and using the savings to get a new 1920x1080 monitor.
  25. XFX P1-650X-CAG9 650W Modular Power Supply $100 and $20 rebate. I think that saves ~$20.
    Combo deal: GIGABYTE GV-R577SO-1GD Radeon HD 5770 1GB and Win7 64bit OEM $260 and $10 rebate. Saves ~$60.

    An aftermarket cooler is optional. The X4 965 comes with the stock AMD CPU cooler. Although if the budget isn't too tight now you might fit one in.
  26. Im starting to like the idea of a HD 5850 more if you can squeeze it into the budget. GIGABYTE GV-R585OC-1GD Radeon HD 5850 $300 and $20 rebate - only $50? more than a GTX 460.

    How is the budget looking?

    edit;
    Combo deal with Video card and Win7
    You can always work a HD monitor into your Christmas wish list...
  27. Checked the power requirements for 2x 5850 in Crossfire. Found this recommendation on the Sapphire 5850 website. 600W for two.
    XFX 650w is still looking good.

  28. ok here is another build but with a 5850 and you can cf in the future (but believe me my other build was better bec. 2 460's beat 2 5850's by alot)

    mobo&os: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.437524.13-128-438

    cpu&gpu: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.432367

    psu&case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.440193

    ram: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231321

    hdd: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822152185

    odd: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106289

    Subtotal: $982.91 before rebates

    no need for haf x the combo of the xfx psu and lancool is a steel

    case review: http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-reviews/22076-lancool-dragonlord-pc-k62-case-review.html

    @wr2 i think 650 will be cuttin it too close

    also for the hsf i would recommend the hyper 212+ from amazon

    edit: changed the psu to 650
  29. mrhoshos96 said:
    @wr2 i think 650 will be cuttin it too close
    I think the Sapphire website got it right.
    When THG tested 2x 5850 in Crossfire they measured 469watts at the wall socket which means the system was pulling something like 400watts (if the PSU was 85% efficient) with the GPUs fully loaded. Add another ~85watts to load up the CPU too and that's still well within the capabilities of a top notch 650W PSU.
  30. Hows this look?

    [url=]
  31. Best answer
    A bit larger PSU than actually required for 2x 5770s in Crossfire - but that's not a problem.

    I really can't pick any holes in the list of parts. Everything should work together really well, and you're on budget. Good job.
  32. WR2 said:
    A bit larger PSU than actually required for 2x 5770s in Crossfire - but that's not a problem.

    I really can't pick any holes in the list of parts. Everything should work together really well, and you're on budget. Good job.


    Actually gonna go 2 5850 But ima start with 1 SAPPHIRE TOXIC 100282TXSR Radeon HD 5850 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102881 for now. I'm a go over budget a little to get a really good video card.
  33. WR2 said:
    I think the Sapphire website got it right.
    When THG tested 2x 5850 in Crossfire they measured 469watts at the wall socket which means the system was pulling something like 400watts (if the PSU was 85% efficient) with the GPUs fully loaded. Add another ~85watts to load up the CPU too and that's still well within the capabilities of a top notch 650W PSU.


    oh thanks wr2 but will the psu operate at it's maximum efficiency
  34. It is an 80 Plus Bronze rated PSU. Tested efficiency (45C! 'hot box') 85.8% @ 412W, 84% @ 550W (480W +12v) and 81.5% @ 660W (588W +12v). Has 4x PCI-e power adapters. Golden Award winner @ Hardware Secrets.
    XFX 650W XXX Edition Modular PSU (P1-650X-CAG9) web page.
  35. WR2 said:
    It is an 80 Plus Bronze rated PSU. Tested efficiency (45C! 'hot box') 85.8% @ 412W, 84% @ 550W (480W +12v) and 81.5% @ 660W (588W +12v). Has 4x PCI-e power adapters. Golden Award winner @ Hardware Secrets.
    XFX 650W XXX Edition Modular PSU (P1-650X-CAG9) web page.

    cool thanks again wr2 thumbs up [:isamuelson:9] [:isamuelson:9]
  36. Of course the XFX 750W model is 80 PLUS Silver. It is a better PSU, no doubt about that. Golden Award @ HardwareSecrets
    And it is only a $20 difference. On a tight budget I don't mind seeing a tight PSU fit using a good PSU.

    @ bigprimo;
    A HD 5850 will rock the 1680x1050 monitor, no doubt about that. And I think it will do a very good job on 1920x1080.

    There is a fair chance the HD 6xxx family will be out by Christmas. It might work out for you to upgrade to a single 6xxx card and sell the HD 5870 to cover part of the upgrade. Just keep that option in mind when you see the 5870s starting to drop in price.
  37. WR2 said:
    Of course the XFX 750W model is 80 PLUS Silver. It is a better PSU, no doubt about that. Golden Award @ HardwareSecrets
    And it is only a $20 difference. On a tight budget I don't mind seeing a tight PSU fit using a good PSU.

    @ bigprimo;
    A HD 5850 will rock the 1680x1050 monitor, no doubt about that. And I think it will do a very good job on 1920x1080.

    There is a fair chance the HD 6xxx family will be out by Christmas. It might work out for you to upgrade to a single 6xxx card and sell the HD 5870 to cover part of the upgrade. Just keep that option in mind when you see the 5870s starting to drop in price.


    I'll mos def keep that in mind.
  38. Best answer selected by bigprimo.
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