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G.Skill RipjawsX F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL (DDR3 1600) Review

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May 8, 2011 8:38:03 AM

Hey to all those who are looking at budget RAM kits, there is a review of the Gskill Ripjaws DDR3 1600 2 x 4GB RAM here: http://www.bjorn3d.com/read.php?cID=2045&pageID=10484

I purchased this RAM for $75.00 on NewEgg on sale and so it can be a bargain as far as price. However, the reviewer states that it does not overclock well (if at all) but is very good at its rated 1.5 V 1600 9-9-9-24 rating. It is also compatible with Sandy Bridge platforms.

The Gskill that did overclock well in the Tom's Hardware review was CL7 and it costs twice as much ($150.00)

Concerning Sandy Bridge builds, the reviewer makes this insightful statement:

CONCLUSION

Intel's Sandy Bridge makes high-speed memory less important than it used to be. In the past, enthusiasts often sought the highest clocked memory speeds they could, with tight timing in order to gain the best performance. Not only did these memory modules help with performance, they also provided headroom for squeezing as many MHz out of the memory during overclocking. Sandy Bridge limits extreme overclocking to K-series CPUs. Even in the K series, it is done by raising the multiplier rather than by tampering with the front side bus. Thus, the need to have the fastest memory is less important.


It is possible that for a desktop Sandy Bridge system that 1600 or 1866 RAM may be the sweet spot between performance and cost. Also, 8 GB seems to be the sweet spot for the amount of RAM needed for a fast system. Corsair 1600 DDR3 CL9 also was on sale for $75.00 at NewEgg and still may be.

Just thought I would let everyone know about the review. It helped me a lot.

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a b } Memory
May 8, 2011 5:23:42 PM

There was an article when SB first came out in January about Best ram speed for SB. http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

Quote:
If you're the type of person that runs dozens of applications all at once, then a higher memory frequency does help, particularly when you're running demanding software. However, our testing shows that memory rated at over 1,866MHz doesn't give much extra performance. Worse still, in some applications only 1,333MHz memory gives a performance penalty, meaning that 1,600MHz memory is fine.

If you're doing anything other than heavy multi-tasking - this goes for gamers in particular - then a 1,600MHz or 1,866MHz kit is plenty. You could opt for CL8, as we saw some advantage in the video encoding test, but we wouldn't obsess over this factor, especially if a CL9 kit is much cheaper.
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May 8, 2011 11:18:51 PM

k1114 said:
There was an article when SB first came out in January about Best ram speed for SB. http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2011/01/11/the-...

Quote:
If you're the type of person that runs dozens of applications all at once, then a higher memory frequency does help, particularly when you're running demanding software. However, our testing shows that memory rated at over 1,866MHz doesn't give much extra performance. Worse still, in some applications only 1,333MHz memory gives a performance penalty, meaning that 1,600MHz memory is fine.

If you're doing anything other than heavy multi-tasking - this goes for gamers in particular - then a 1,600MHz or 1,866MHz kit is plenty. You could opt for CL8, as we saw some advantage in the video encoding test, but we wouldn't obsess over this factor, especially if a CL9 kit is much cheaper.



Thanks, that is a superb article. Everyone who is considering a Sandy Bridge build should read that article. It confirms what I have read in several reviews that with the new Sandy Bridge architecture, there is very little bang for the buck by going to exotic high bandwidth memory. Very few users will see much of a difference between CL9 1600 DDR3 and CL7 2133 DDR3 memory.
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May 16, 2011 6:06:16 PM

Best answer selected by flong.
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