Clock making me mad

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

i just bought my computer 2 months ago, and now the clock will not keep time.
It is not snychronizing properly, and I will be pretty angry if it is my
battery.
8 answers Last reply
More about clock making
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    Cugie wrote:
    > i just bought my computer 2 months ago, and now the clock will not
    > keep time. It is not snychronizing properly, and I will be pretty
    > angry if it is my battery.

    However, the battery is an easy fix - since the computer is only 2 months
    old..

    --
    <- Shenan ->
    --
    The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
    yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
    responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
    getting into before you jump in with both feet.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 19:25:03 -0700, Cugie wrote:

    > i just bought my computer 2 months ago, and now the clock will not keep time.
    > It is not snychronizing properly, and I will be pretty angry if it is my
    > battery.

    The battery only needs replacing if the time is off at startup. Windows
    picks up the time from the system at start up. From that point on, it
    advances time using its own mechanisms.

    If time discrepancies occur after startup, then look for a different
    solution. For example: programs hogging cpu cycles or cleaners that bounce
    the date and time around to access otherwise inaccessible files. Some Dells
    early in XP's life cycle had a problem keeping time. Dell released a
    fix/patch for those systems.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    In news:E563BE0C-8CF5-409F-A98E-74B77E74B65B@microsoft.com,
    Cugie <Cugie@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > i just bought my computer 2 months ago, and now the clock will
    > not
    > keep time. It is not snychronizing properly, and I will be
    > pretty
    > angry if it is my battery.

    Before anyone whose clock is running slow rushes out to buy a new
    battery, he should first take note of whether he is losing time
    while the computer is running or while it's powered off. If it's
    while powered off, the problem *is* very likely the battery. But
    if it's while running, it can *not* be the battery, because the
    battery isn't used while the computer is running.

    If the clock loses time while running, try this:

    Open a command prompt window (Start | Run | cmd) and enter the
    following commands:

    net stop w32time

    w32tm /unregister

    w32tm /register

    net start w32time


    By the way, even if it turns out to be the battery, a new one
    only costs a couple of dollars, and isn't really much of a
    problem.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    In news:%23HNh7sbQFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
    Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 19:25:03 -0700, Cugie wrote:
    >
    >> i just bought my computer 2 months ago, and now the clock will not
    >> keep time. It is not snychronizing properly, and I will be pretty
    >> angry if it is my battery.
    >
    > The battery only needs replacing if the time is off at startup.
    > Windows picks up the time from the system at start up. From that
    > point on, it advances time using its own mechanisms.
    >
    > If time discrepancies occur after startup, then look for a different
    > solution. For example: programs hogging cpu cycles or cleaners that
    > bounce the date and time around to access otherwise inaccessible
    > files. Some Dells early in XP's life cycle had a problem keeping
    > time. Dell released a fix/patch for those systems.

    Heyya Sharon :)

    Tag! You're it...

    Anyhow, let's also make the OP paranoid? It could also be that it came from
    the factory with a bad RTC (real time chip or real time clock) which is a
    chip on the motherboard that's responsible for clock functions. You can
    replace them but it's not easy and requires specialized soldering guns and
    removers as well as a heat shield. If your clock requires setting from the
    SAME date and time each time you boot then it's the battery in most cases.
    Clocks seldom fade due to the battery, they just die and all BIOS settings
    are lost. On the other hand if time slows down over a period of time
    (sometimes it can be failing for years before a complete failure occurs)
    then it's USUALLY the RTC that's at fault if it's not something mentioned by
    Sharon like CPU cycles being eaten up by something major. I should think
    that if you were having enough resources to slow the clock down enough to
    notice it then you'd be posting different questions though.

    Open the Control Panel, click classic view, open the System applet...
    Hardware tab, device manager... Expand system devices... Is there a Yellow
    warning flag next to System CMOS/Real Time Clock? If so RMA your board...
    Send it back while it's still under waranty... Even if it isn't flagged
    replace your battery (no reason to be mad about it, it happens all the time
    and even fresh out of the package they come dead at times) with a new one.

    This is going to sound insane but, if you don't have a multimeter or the
    like you can just pop said battery into your mouth. Really... It's very low
    voltage but enough to tingle a little. Make sure it contacts on both sides
    in your mouth. If it tingles and your clock's slowing down but not stopping
    or resetting to the same exact date and time then you've a serious issue and
    it's nothing you want to play with as a home user.

    I'm not kidding about putting it in your mouth... Dry it off before putting
    it back in the case of course.

    Galen
    --
    Signature changed for a moment of silence.
    Rest well Alex and we'll see you on the other side.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 10:44:02 -0400, Galen wrote:

    > Heyya Sharon :)
    >
    > Tag! You're it...

    Hi, Galen!

    Aside: Whenever I get a new system, I check time/date in BIOS settings.
    Then work with time/date in Windows. Old habit, I guess.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    In news:OIy1DofQFHA.3120@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> had this to say:

    > Aside: Whenever I get a new system, I check time/date in BIOS
    > settings. Then work with time/date in Windows. Old habit, I guess.

    Me too as a general rule I actually try to stay out of the BIOS as much as
    possible. I've only flashed my own BIOS a single time on all the computers
    that I have owned and that was because it was a nessesity and too long a
    story to bother with today. Other than that once the PC is old and there's a
    replacement I take out all the stops and have been known to overclock them
    here and there mostly just to see how it was done and how fast you can get
    it to go. Lately I've been using not the fastest PC in the house but the one
    that does the trick the best and is the most stable. It's a simple AMD XP
    3200+ (MINOTAUR if you caught the posts in DTS) with just 1 GB of RAM. It's
    on a GigaByte board and I've been tempted to play with it because there's a
    lot of room to OC it and the both the board and chip seem to be expecting me
    to do so.

    Back onto the topic for a moment... It's less common now to see problems
    with the RTC right out of the factory door. When a system is new it should
    be given the burn in process which should hopefully highlight these
    problems. A good 72 hour intensive burn-in is enough to cause most hardware
    to fail that's going to fail in the next five years or so. I've never had a
    problem with hardware that has passed a 72 hour burn-in though I've waited
    almost two weeks recently as parts kept getting replaced due to failure.
    (They gave me a bunch of free goodies to go along with it so I didn't mind
    too much and it's not like I was without a computer.) When getting a custom
    PC built the first thing I check (after price and components that I'm
    specifically looking for) is to see if they offer burn-in testing in house
    and how much they charge for it. When I buy a custom piece I expect it to be
    have gone through it and I don't expect to pay extra for it or if it is
    extra I don't expect it to be a lot of money. After all, if I wanted to end
    up taking it apart to send parts back I'd have saved even more money and put
    it together myself.

    Unfortunately I don't know if the big OEMs do this. I suspect that they
    don't though they surely must have some sort of QoS processes, maybe if they
    did there wouldn't be quite as much need to outsource the support centers to
    other countries. It's not quite so common a problem and the whole bit about
    sticking the battery in their mouth was completely serious. Now really? Do
    you think I'd make something like that up? <g>

    Galen
    --
    Signature changed for a moment of silence.
    Rest well Alex and we'll see you on the other side.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 17:11:04 -0400, Galen wrote:

    > Back onto the topic for a moment... It's less common now to see problems
    > with the RTC right out of the factory door.

    Have had a few ship with the time set for a different zone :)

    Sounds like you're having lots of fun with all those different systems. I
    had a Gigabyte board on the last system and it performed well. Was very
    happy with it. Now have an A... oh crumb, never remember if it's Asus or
    Abit... just a sec. It's an Abit (AN7). There's settings on this board I've
    never seen on others. Most of these are for overclocking which I don't get
    into either.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.configuration_manage (More info?)

    In news:uq4LPOqQFHA.4028@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl,
    Sharon F <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > Have had a few ship with the time set for a different zone :)
    >
    > Sounds like you're having lots of fun with all those different
    > systems. I had a Gigabyte board on the last system and it performed
    > well. Was very happy with it. Now have an A... oh crumb, never
    > remember if it's Asus or Abit... just a sec. It's an Abit (AN7).
    > There's settings on this board I've never seen on others. Most of
    > these are for overclocking which I don't get into either.

    That's not too bad a board. Once you get a replacement for that one you can
    feel free to OC it which is an education in and of itself. It's also a lot
    of fun. I don't recommend that most people try it because no matter who you
    are if you're willing to push a little then chances are you'll want to push
    more and eventually you WILL break something. But if it's an old standby
    system or one that you were going to donate anyhow you might as well see
    what you can do with it and how far you can push it. I've managed to get an
    old AMD K6-II 350 to run at about 525 and stay stable though it got pretty
    warm it never stopped. I think I still own it somewhere and that it's
    probably still set to run at that speed. It was pretty amazing back then. It
    was benchmarking somewhere near the PIII 650s or so, it was pretty neat.

    Galen
    --
    Signature changed for a moment of silence.
    Rest well Alex and we'll see you on the other side.
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