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CPU/MOTHERBOARD POWER?

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July 23, 2010 10:49:47 PM

Hi!

I have just bought some new hardware:
Intel Core™ i7 Quad Processor i7-930, Quad Core, 2.8Ghz, Socket 1366, 8MB, 130W, Boxed w/fan
Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R, X58, Socket-1366, DDR3, ATX, USB3.0, SATA 6Gb/s, 2xPCI-Ex(2.0)x16, Revision 2.0
CORSAIR TX 750W ATX12V 2.2 / EPS12V

But I have come up with a problem:
I simply can’t find out if my PSU, motherboard and CPU is compatible and therefore my build have come to a tragic stop.

CPUpower connector (motherboard) - http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/918/40575850.jpg
Corsair PSU CPUpower cable - http://www.corsair.com/_images/products/hx_eps-atx12v_8...
Full motherboard - http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/5614/39748157.jpg


I’ve seen some threads about this ‘’ATX12V / EPS12V’’ issue here on Tom’s Hardware, but none of them have answered my questions and since I don’t want to fry my new hardware; I’m asking for your expertise.

:??:  Q1: My motherboard says it needs ATX_12V_2X (8-pin) to power the CPU, what is that?
:??:  Q2: Are ATX12V / EPS12V PSUs supported/ compatible with ATX_12V_2X motherboards?
:??:  Q3: Will my PSU work just fine on this ATX_12V_2X motherboard (Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R) or do I have to look for another PSU with an ATX12V 8-pin CPUpower cable?
:??:  Q4: EPS12V = 2x4-pin ATX12V CPUpower?

Thanks in advance
/M9A2

More about : cpu motherboard power

July 23, 2010 11:03:46 PM

A1: ATX is the form factor of the motherboard, 12V is voltage, 2X means (I'm not sure about this one) [two times] 4 pin connection
A2: Yes.
A3: Yes, it will work fine.
A4: Don't think they are "equivalent", but I'm no good with terminology (diction).

edit: probably a quick check on wikipedia will do a world of good.
Related resources
July 23, 2010 11:12:45 PM

beerhelmet said:
A1: ATX is the form factor of the motherboard, 12V is voltage, 2X means (I'm not sure about this one) [two times] 4 pin connection
A2: Yes.
A3: Yes, it will work fine.
A4: Don't think they are "equivalent", but I'm no good with terminology (diction).

edit: probably a quick check on wikipedia will do a world of good.

Ok, so what you're saying is basically that I will be able to plug in the whole ESP12V cable into my motherboard to power my 130Watt i7 930 even thou it says something about ATX_12V_2X (ATX12V 8-pin) without damaging it? :??: 
July 23, 2010 11:16:11 PM

dude read the product specs:


1 x 12V(4/8Pin)


You will be perfectly fine. It says it right there....12V 8 pin.
July 23, 2010 11:19:06 PM

csperling said:
dude read the product specs:


1 x 12V(4/8Pin)


You will be perfectly fine. It says it right there....12V 8 pin.

Ok, thank you.
So basically ATX and ESP are different form factors, but work the same way? :??: 
July 23, 2010 11:28:27 PM

csperling said:
ATX is 4pin 12v, ESP is 8pin 12v.



http://discuss.extremetech.com/forums/thread/1004384278...


In the specs that PSU is rated for both ATX12v/EPS12v, meaning it has both connectors.

Ok, so there is no such thing as an ATX12V 8-pin connector; 8-pin is and will forever only be an ESP? :??: 
Thanks a lot thou for you previous answers. :kaola: 
July 23, 2010 11:44:08 PM

csperling said:
Well not technically, because its ATX12v x2 = EPS 12v. Read up here there is a plethora of good info. ATX12v = 4 pin....EPS 12v = 8 pin



http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/247828-28-what-eps12v

Yes, this is one of the texts that I referred to earlier. ;) 
Well, I'll try and if it won't work I guess I'll have to spend my next five years saving for a new build.

Edit: ATX12V 2.2 vs. ATX12V 2.3; does this have something to do with the form factor or fitting in the case/motherboard?

I can assure you I do Google myself for facts, but when I do find/read them,
they only make me more confused since there’re so many numbers and facts of the fact. :kaola: 
July 24, 2010 2:42:34 AM

Nice post. Now if my MB and PSU have the EPS 8 pins connectors, how can I know if my cpu really needs it?
July 24, 2010 12:04:48 PM

damian86 said:
Nice post. Now if my MB and PSU have the EPS 8 pins connectors, how can I know if my cpu really needs it?

Indeed, that's what I'm trying to find out as well!? :heink: 

Edit: I would love if someone could upload a picture or two from their own build (anything or cable management), to get this thread going!? :love: 
July 24, 2010 4:44:49 PM

Here are some pics of my old rig, an example of what i'm talking about, the other 4 connector with the cap on and another one off, then a pic of the custom ram,lol :)  Cable managment is the best i could do on this case. But wait to see my next baby coming soon.









July 24, 2010 4:48:32 PM

How can i post the pictures directly
July 24, 2010 5:12:11 PM

damian86 said:
Here are some pics of my old rig, an example of what i'm talking about, the other 4 connector with the cap on and another one off, then a pic of the custom ram,lol :)  Cable managment is the best i could do on this case. But wait to see my next baby coming soon.

http://www.mediafire.com/i/?o563b4mzbnb1t0d

http://www.mediafire.com/i/?oodtssow76jdj5j

http://www.mediafire.com/i/?auxfdds0i0g5de0

http://www.mediafire.com/i/?pgfvk3zjg1ti2a4


damian86 said:
How can i post the pictures directly

Thanks a lot man, awesome job! I don't know if you can post pictures directly, but URLs should be more than fine!? :na: 

I see you only uses an ATX12V (4-pin), shouldn’t you be using an ESP12V (8-pin) instead since your clock is so high? I might be mistaken but higher clocks most mean a higher power consumption or is it simply because you uses a Dual Core and not an i7 (Quad Core Processor)? :??: 
July 24, 2010 5:43:58 PM

I don't really know if I need to use it, I've always been using it with the 4 pins and never took the clock over 3.75 ( at 4.05 I will get bsod)lol.
I know what you mean, The PSU manual says: " 6 pin configuration supports two sockets server/workstation systems and some single socket PC systems (ATX12V v2.2 & EPS12v2.1)"


"4 pin configurations supports most ATX/BTX systems.(ATX12v v1.3/v2.01). Please use connector with +12v marking"

So I've never plugged it in. I understand that if you have a MB with 2 CPU sockets (server) you will need it.
July 24, 2010 6:08:23 PM

damian86 said:
I don't really know if I need to use it, I've always been using it with the 4 pins and never took the clock over 3.75 ( at 4.05 I will get bsod)lol.
I know what you mean, The PSU manual says: " 6 pin configuration supports two sockets server/workstation systems and some single socket PC systems (ATX12V v2.2 & EPS12v2.1)"


"4 pin configurations supports most ATX/BTX systems.(ATX12v v1.3/v2.01). Please use connector with +12v marking"

So I've never plugged it in. I understand that if you have a MB with 2 CPU sockets (server) you will need it.

Ok then, but if you have a single CPU system, with just an i7 930 (130W), is it ok/good to plug in the EPS12V (8-pin) connector or will it damage it because there are more power allowed to enter the motherboard, (damage the MB and other components) or is the EPS12V (8-pin) recommended in this situation? :??: 

I know a lot of people, including you have answer my questions, but still I would really like to solve this issue, since it’s still unclear for me if I actually can pull this off or only by succeeding with creating a July 4th firework inferno? :cry: 
a c 172 à CPUs
a c 156 V Motherboard
July 24, 2010 6:23:38 PM

If you have an 8 pin PSU plug and an 8 pin motherboard socket available, use them, especially with an i7-930.

Even if you do not need all the extra power, the motherboard will not pull more power from the PSU than it needs.

July 24, 2010 6:54:20 PM

jsc said:
If you have an 8 pin PSU plug and an 8 pin motherboard socket available, use them, especially with an i7-930.

Even if you do not need all the extra power, the motherboard will not pull more power from the PSU than it needs.

Sir, thank you very much for your reply; this helped a lot! I just hope you speak the truth! :sarcastic: 

EDIT: I'm not sure if you're a troll or not, no offence and I'm sry but it says you joined this forum '' 01/01/1970 '', but I guess that's none of my business? :??: 
July 24, 2010 7:40:57 PM

jsc said:
If you have an 8 pin PSU plug and an 8 pin motherboard socket available, use them, especially with an i7-930.

Even if you do not need all the extra power, the motherboard will not pull more power from the PSU than it needs.


I still cannot understand why a single cpu would use 2 power sources, my CPU is also 130W! :sweat: 

http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=27521
July 24, 2010 7:44:53 PM

damian86 said:
I still cannot understand why a single cpu would use 2 power sources, my CPU is also 130W! :sweat: 

http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=27521

''EPS12V is defined in SSI, and used primarily by SMP/multi-core systems such as Core 2, Core i7, Opteron and Xeon. It has a 24-pin main connector (same as ATX12V v2.x), an 8-pin secondary connector, and an optional 4-pin tertiary connector. To ensure backwards compatibility with ATX12V, many power supply makers implement the 8-pin connector as two combinable 4-pin connectors.'' - Wikipedia :??: 
!