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New build with last Generation hardware won't boot

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  • Homebuilt
  • Hardware
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
July 24, 2010 1:37:26 AM

I'm rebuilding a computer for a friend. The hardware is thus:

Mobo: GA-965G-DS3
RAM: Generic 1.8V DDR2800 until I can set the BIOS voltage higher for better RAM
GPU: MSI 8600 GT
Netgear PCI wireless networking card
CPU: Celeron 450 2.2GHz
Rosewill 550W psu

First and foremost, the mobo is brand new, I used it once in another build but the memory I had was incompatible so I purchased a new board since I had come into some money at the time. I don't think the board is dead since all the components on the board get power like the CPU and GPU, etc. Nothing comes on the screen when I turn the system on. Everything spins up, no video. There is no speaker attached to the mobo so idt I can get any beep codes for confirmation. I'm gonna borrow a speaker from my own system to see if I can get some further information. Any ideas you can field me are welcome.

I've tried disconnecting the GPU, hard drive, and ODD. I'll also try using different memory slots to see if that works.

More about : build generation hardware boot

a b B Homebuilt system
July 24, 2010 2:28:45 AM

Not posting and fans spinning typically indicates either RAM problems or a short some where.

Given that you have some generic RAM I would point the finger at your RAM. Try one stick and see if that works for you. If not try the other stick. It has to be in DIMM 0-A (or 1-A whichever is the actual first dimm slot)

ask7852 said:
I'm rebuilding a computer for a friend. The hardware is thus:

Mobo: GA-965G-DS3
RAM: Generic 1.8V DDR2800 until I can set the BIOS voltage higher for better RAM
GPU: MSI 8600 GT
Netgear PCI wireless networking card
CPU: Celeron 450 2.2GHz
Rosewill 550W psu

First and foremost, the mobo is brand new, I used it once in another build but the memory I had was incompatible so I purchased a new board since I had come into some money at the time. I don't think the board is dead since all the components on the board get power like the CPU and GPU, etc. Nothing comes on the screen when I turn the system on. Everything spins up, no video. There is no speaker attached to the mobo so idt I can get any beep codes for confirmation. I'm gonna borrow a speaker from my own system to see if I can get some further information. Any ideas you can field me are welcome.

I've tried disconnecting the GPU, hard drive, and ODD. I'll also try using different memory slots to see if that works.

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July 24, 2010 5:46:14 AM

Well I tried the different memory slots to no avail. I also plugged in that mobo speaker and it gave no error codes. I'm not sure where there would be a short. The CPU fan starts spinning a few seconds after the rest of the system starts up, is that normal? It's a stock cooler for a crappy Celeron.
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Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
July 24, 2010 6:01:13 AM

Did you reset the cmos before trying to start it up? Some are very picky about that. It's usually a jumper setting. I've even seen them ship with jumper on clear and not the run setting.

Also, if that does not work, remove all extra cards, then attempt to boot again.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 24, 2010 6:24:14 AM

The last time I saw the problem you describe it was discovered that a Front Panel USB port was damaged and was shorting the system out. I would make sure that all your USB ports are ok and make sure that the connectors are correctly placed on the motherboard.
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a c 121 B Homebuilt system
July 24, 2010 4:10:34 PM

My first guess would be that crappy PSU. But on to troubleshooting ...

You have worked through our standard checklist and troubleshooting thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-read-postin...
yes? I mean work through, not just read over it.

Breadboard - that will isolate any kind of case problem.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

The breadboarding thread has a paragraph about how to build and test a PC in stages.

Breadboard with just motherboard, CPU & HSF, case speaker, and PSU. You do have a case speaker installed, right? If not, you really, really need one. If your case or motherboard didn't come with a system speaker, you can buy one here:
http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html

You can turn on the PC by momentarily shorting the two pins that the case power switch goes to.

You should hear a series of long, single beeps indicating memory problems.
Silence indicates a problem with (in most likely order) the PSU, motherboard, or CPU.

At this point, you can sort of check the PSU. Try to borrow a known good PSU. If you cannot do that, use a DMM to measure the voltages. Measure between the colored wires and either chassis ground or the black wires. Yellow wires should be 12 volts. Red wires: +5 volts, orange wires: +3.3 volts, blue wire : -12 volts, violet wire: 5 volts always on. Tolerances are +/- 5% except for the -12 volts which is +/- 10%.

The gray wire is really important. It should go from 0 to +5 volts when you turn the PSU on with the case switch. CPU needs this signal to boot.

You can turn on the PSU by completely disconnecting the PSU and using a paperclip or jumper wire to short the green wire to one of the neighboring black wires.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FWXgQSokF4&feature=yout...

This checks the PSU under no load conditions, so it is not completely reliable. But if
it can not pass this, it is dead. Then repeat the checks with the PSU plugged into the computer to put a load on the PSU.

Install a memory stick. Boot. Beep pattern should change to one long and several short beeps indicating a missing graphics card. Silence or long single beeps indicate a problem with the memory.

Insert the video card and connect any necessary PCIe power connectors. Boot. At this point, the system should POST successfully (a single short beep). Notice that you do not need keyboard, mouse, monitor, or drives to successfully POST.

Now start connecting the rest of the devices starting with the monitor, then keyboard and mouse, then the rest of the devices, testing after each step.
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July 24, 2010 7:48:56 PM

@ohiou: I will definitely check that out next time I get a peek at the board. The idea never occurred to me.
@Wam: I can just disconnect all the header cables and that will solve that test, right?

@jsc: Thank you for posting those troubleshooting guides, I had no idea they were available. As far as the list in that guide is concerned, I've completed every single step except for resetting the CMOS. Everything was satisfactory as far as the guide is concerned. I also had misplaced the I/O shield for the motherboard and was not using one when the mobo was secured in the case. Would this cause a short? Also, are there specific screws that need to be used in the motherboard? I used screws that fit from my collection, and they were the only ones that fit.

As far as that PSU is concerned, its a known good PSU for me. I had just removed it from my own build not even a few days beforehand. Would it have failed as soon as I removed it? My build was definitely a higher load than this system I'm working on.

Are the HDD access and power LEDs required to be plugged into the board? I tried booting without them and nothing happened. I'll try breadboarding the components once I'm able to get to my friends house again and I'll also see if I can get you guys some pictures relating to specific concerns.

Also, the case I am using is an NZXT Apollo. Maybe someone with experience with that case can help me figure out if the power switch cables and stuff are funky.

EDIT: My buddy is currently using that Rosewill in his other computer as we speak to power a generic system. His components:

Mobo: Generic, I'm going to assume an intel board
CPU: Celeron 450 listed above
RAM: Generic RAM, I'll see if I can get specifics on this (1.8V)
GPU: The MSI 8600 listed above
HDD: Seagate 250GB
CD/DVD Drive
Netgear Wireless NIC
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