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60gb SSD for my laptop's only drive - crazy or more than enough?

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October 5, 2012 6:56:54 AM

So I posted about my current situation with having one desktop down earlier, and now the situation has deteriorated into me trying to figure out what parts to move to what machines to test, ect. It's a mess.

Basically, I've abandoned the high-end desktop rigs for my old college laptop that has a T3400 Core 2 Duo processor and just 3gb of RAM. It's currently running Lubuntu 12.04 32-bit very well, but I know the OLD 5400rpm disk is slowing it down. I literally only use this machine the same way I use my 7" tablet- check email, shop for computer components, and maybe stream music from Pandora or Spotify. There isn't really much "storage" required. It's just nicer than trying to type and read a tablet screen.

*My point is to simply ask*: could I reasonably remove a (near empty) 250gb HDD and replace it with a 60gb (maybe even 30gb?) SSD for the Lubuntu OS? I am sure this would make a huge difference in speed, but I have enough SSD experience to know that the smaller the drive, the more impact the same amount of data has on the disk's health and lifespan. I assume I'd want to go with something that has a Marvel controller instead of the Intel 520's that I use at higher capacities, and try to find the SSD that best handles itself as the drive has a smaller ratio of free space.

Would anyone have suggestions on this matter? I literally don't want to spend more than $60 here, because I've already told myself if the LCD screen burns out for that price again, it's time for a new machine....

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October 5, 2012 7:27:44 AM

for what you want to do with it 60GB will work fine... you could always pick up a 128 (because they're sub $100 now) and use it in the laptop until it croaks on you and you can/will have a SSD with a good amount of space to put in another laptop or pc @ a later point in time.
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October 5, 2012 7:33:05 AM

For web browsing, email, music streaming, 60GB is more than enough. Even with Windows 7 I could install a couple of Crysis sized games on my 60GB SSD when I had it.
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October 5, 2012 8:53:46 AM

Go for the best Mushkin one, they are probably the best SSD makers along with Samsung. Im guessing the one where you save $90 is the better one, so get that. I'm not the best with SSD's, but if they both cost the same, might as well get the one which saves you more.
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October 5, 2012 9:23:38 AM

If you trust eBay there are a bunch of new 60GB SSDs going for much cheaper.
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October 5, 2012 9:42:15 AM

ocmusicjunkie said:
Would anyone have suggestions on this matter? I literally don't want to spend more than $60 here, because I've already told myself if the LCD screen burns out for that price again, it's time for a new machine....


You'll have yourself a nice little system there.

My laptop is a Core 2 Duo 2.0Ghz, 4Gb RAM. Swapped out the dreadful harddrive and replaced with a 60Gb Kingston V series SSD. Have Windows 7 x64 and all the general stuff you'd expect, Firefox, Open Office, stuff like that. I'm using about 35Gb of the drive. Fits easily. Despite the old processor is still blazingly fast for general internet and ofice tasks, and on boot it's only using about 1.2Gb of RAM and rarely uses more than 2gb.

I'd imagine you'll be limited by the SATA 2 interface on your motherboard rather than by the harddrive itself so all SSDs are going to perform about the same on your machine, just get whatever's the best deal (To clarify, this paragraph is conjecture on my part: can anyone confirm/deny this please?).
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October 5, 2012 11:34:00 AM

gopher1369 said:
You'll have yourself a nice little system there.

My laptop is a Core 2 Duo 2.0Ghz, 4Gb RAM. Swapped out the dreadful harddrive and replaced with a 60Gb Kingston V series SSD. Have Windows 7 x64 and all the general stuff you'd expect, Firefox, Open Office, stuff like that. I'm using about 35Gb of the drive. Fits easily. Despite the old processor is still blazingly fast for general internet and ofice tasks, and on boot it's only using about 1.2Gb of RAM and rarely uses more than 2gb.

I'd imagine you'll be limited by the SATA 2 interface on your motherboard rather than by the harddrive itself so all SSDs are going to perform about the same on your machine, just get whatever's the best deal (To clarify, this paragraph is conjecture on my part: can anyone confirm/deny this please?).


Good to know that it should run well. I had Win7 64-bit on here for a while using a V200 and it just wasn't cutting it. I think it was the fact I was stuck using the 64 over 32-bit install since it was an activation key that was only free for a couple weeks while the system it would go back to was being rebuilt. I did notice lightweight items like Chromium moved blazing fast though. I can only imagine how fast this light of OS will run...

To answer your question about the SATA II speed- it's actually pretty linear. My most frequently used personal use desktop has a SATA II interface. Different model SSD's do run at different speeds. For example, going from a 120gb Intel 330 to a 180gb Intel 520 made the write benchmarks go from ~120mbps sequential to over 180mbps. When I switched to a RAID 0 configuration using a pair of 120gb SSD's, it's at 275mbps read/write sequential. I don't know the technical reasoning well enough to try explaining, but the fact is that the slowest SSD will still be 10x faster than the fastest 2.5" HDD for responsiveness- it won't make much difference if that number is 10x or 15x faster when you aren't running a benchmark. Thus why I really only care about reliability and life expectancy with the model choice. :hello: 
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October 6, 2012 10:39:46 PM

bgrt said:
If you trust eBay there are a bunch of new 60GB SSDs going for much cheaper.


There's no reason not to trust eBay... just go with folks who have really good feedback ratings (anything over 98%), or better yet, go with a Trusted Seller. You'll pay a little more that way, but it's work avoiding any hassles.

And even if there are problems, I can tell you from experience that both eBay and PayPal tend to strongly favor the buyer if it comes to having to file a claim. Which is a pain in the tail as a seller, but awfully useful if you're the buyer. I've gotten some excellent deals on computer components and never yet been burned.
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October 29, 2012 3:24:41 PM

Best answer selected by ocmusicjunkie.
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