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Combine 2 or more DSL Lines To Increase Bandwidth?

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  • LAN
  • DSL
  • Bandwidth
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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March 24, 2010 8:16:14 AM

Can you somehow connect two or more different DSL lines or modems into one hub, router, or whatever to increase the bandwidth? Or have some sort of advantage?

I have heard of this being done before! From my teacher in my computer engineering classes. So I know it is possible. I just don't know how to do it.

What would bridging two modems together and sharing that bridge with the network do? But I really would like to combine at lease 3 DSLs together. Cause of the number of computers, DVRs, game systems, and other wireless devices in this house is insane and we max it out easily. Just 3 out of 20 of those things can really slow down my internet!!!

My DSL provider will not allow an upgrade and we are planning on adding extra lines anyway so we can let each person have their own line. But this is a waste of bandwidth and money!!! Cause when I go to download some movies to my DVR and play my xbox the xbox (video game system) has a bad connection with everyone... Thats just two things. Someone gets on their xbox or download some stuff and I get kicked offline all the time...

Anyway, I have taken plenty of computer classes and can do anything with enough instruction. So if it requires building or modding a router or something then I can do it. Ideally I'd like to get 4 DSL lines and then output it to my network. We plan to get 5 DSL lines installed in 5 rooms with 5 new phone numbers to go along with it cause they won't let us just not have a phone for some reason... Now one line will be left alone for my parents office. But the other 4 lines I would love to combine!

Just to give you an idea of how much of a waste of money this is, it is $85 per line! Thats $425 a month!!!! So my parents are insane. But have the money... I still say it's a waste of money cause I'll max out my own and then my sisters won't even use theirs... I have the house wired up and most things are also wireless to. So It'll be no problem to get them all on the same network! Sense we already are. All I need to do is hook all the DSL modems up in one room and combine them.

Can someone please help me? I really hate to waste money...

Thanks

More about : combine dsl lines increase bandwidth

March 24, 2010 8:28:53 AM

not possible to combine adsl connections..
why don't you get one connection with good speed & share it with ethernet switch..

if your ISP dont offer a connection with good speed kick him off & try with some other isp..
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March 24, 2010 8:59:40 AM

manojgj said:
not possible to combine adsl connections..
why don't you get one connection with good speed & share it with ethernet switch..

if your ISP dont offer a connection with good speed kick him off & try with some other isp..



I figured someone like you would say that right off the bat... It is possible I just told you it is!

Also there is no other provider of any kind of internet within 100 miles of me! Ever think of that? "Go get a better provider with faster speed?" Hmm, why didn't I think of that??? That would save hundreds of dollars!!! Can't! There is no one. I live in the mountains out in the middle of no where. And satellite isn't any kind of option so don't even try that.

Anyway, who are you to say it's not possible? Not to be rude, but just saying it isn't possible isn't good enough. You really must tell me why you "think" it isn't possible and what qualifies you to make that assessment?

You may think I'm talking about using a computer to do this. No... It is a some sort of hub that allows this and it used to be used commonly in some other countries. Or at least I read about a similar one in Japan. I speak Japanese and the article was in Japanese... Though of course it was their version of dsl... I forget that it's called. But they've been using it long before us. Also I read about systems being build very similar to this in colleges but for stupid tests... Never really was clear on what the point was but it did say the bandwidth was increased to an insane number! But never said to what extent... And my teacher told us how to do it but we were more interested in the gigabits of download speed we were getting off this direct feed of a fiber optic line before it was to be used in the city. So forgive me for not listening in class...



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March 24, 2010 9:27:12 AM

now i got some thing with google for you to explain it.
go to the link & read it fully
at the end of page you have this." Unfortunately Combining Bandwidth can not be done without the ISP providing such a specific service. "
http://www.ezlan.net/loadbalance.html

apart from this you mentioned about my language usage..
english is not my first language & i don't have proficiency in english to use tenses correctly..this is a technical forum & people share their knowledge not an military nor the corporate helpline ..

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March 24, 2010 10:10:30 AM

manojgj said:
now i got some thing with google for you to explain it.
go to the link & read it fully
at the end of page you have this." Unfortunately Combining Bandwidth can not be done without the ISP providing such a specific service. "
http://www.ezlan.net/loadbalance.html

apart from this you mentioned about my language usage..
english is not my first language & i don't have proficiency in english to use tenses correctly..this is a technical forum & people share their knowledge not an military nor the corporate helpline ..



Sorry, I didn't say anything about your language. I only said I speak Japanese... Sorry for any misunderstanding...

Still I must not be making myself clear enough... I don't wish to increase the bandwidth on the ISPs side just my side. lol... This may not make much sense at first. But its really very simple. The device will use up Modem 1 and before maxing out Modem 1 it assigns new ports or address to Modem 2 and so on with modem 3 and 4. Also it might be able to assign these ports or address in another way. First address or port is assigned to modem 1 then the second is assigned to modem 2, and 3 and 4... Do you understand?

Ok so its not like you are really increasing you bandwidth. But you are increasing your speed. Cause if you max out you modem then the max upload and download for the current action is decreased. Also this stops you from being kicked out of servers and so on. So overall you have more bandwidth to use just not all at once. I listened enough to know that. I just figured it was more common knowledge, so I didn't go into to grate of detail. Also I had hoped to find something better. And I haven't been to been in 30+ hours and I most likely sound like an idiot, so I'm trying to keep it short and simple...

Also, hacking an ISP server isn't nothing new. I was kinda wondering if someone would mention things about that. There are programs that can get into you ISP's server and reroute your requests. This isn't what I'm looking for and I do not wish for anyone to talk about it on here. Just thought it would be nice to see a legal hack or something you know?

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March 24, 2010 10:17:45 AM

Oh I just read your link lol. Load Balancing... Sorry, guess thats the term I should have used... But do they make anything bigger than a Dual WAN Routers. Like one that can accept 4 connections?
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March 24, 2010 11:25:24 AM

manojgj said:
now i got some thing with google for you to explain it.
go to the link & read it fully
at the end of page you have this." Unfortunately Combining Bandwidth can not be done without the ISP providing such a specific service. "
http://www.ezlan.net/loadbalance.html

apart from this you mentioned about my language usage..
english is not my first language & i don't have proficiency in english to use tenses correctly..this is a technical forum & people share their knowledge not an military nor the corporate helpline ..



Oh I just read your link lol. Load Balancing... Sorry, guess thats the term I should have used... But do they make anything bigger than a Dual WAN Routers. Like one that can accept 4 connections?

So thats basically what I'm looking for then. You just have to get two DSL lines and hook them up to the Dual Wan Router, go into the system and enter the information to your ISP?

Would it work ok if I wired it up to a WRT54G Linksys and connected 4 other Linksys wirelessly to the first Linksys? It would still use the two DSL lines as best as possible then...

Do you know where I can find a Dual Wan Router for DSL? All I can find is ones for Cable and T1... I need the WRT54G for a mod I need to do to get the other Linsys to connect.
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March 25, 2010 3:48:40 PM

google "dual wan nat"

somewhere in there you'll find a router that will allow load balancing two internet connections.

Now, the bandwidth won't be load balanced per packet, but per stream. This means if you have two 256kbit dsl connections, you max download speed will still be 256kbit, but now you can have two streams of 256kbit.

I'm not sure how well they work, I know you could make a simple linux router and setup more advanaced load balancing that way.
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April 9, 2010 5:43:05 PM

Well,...I cannot help you. But I can tell you IT IS POSSIBLE. Because I had a wired lan and wireless lan working together and their bandwidths combined! It was some fluke,..because after formatting my computer, it doesn't happen anymore. And so annoyed with people telling me it's not possible! It is,..because I had it. But don't know how to get it to that setting now!!!!
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September 1, 2010 12:26:49 AM

To close the debate on possible or not, I have done this in the past but that was in 2003 and the concept was similar to having dual ISDN. However these days, things are a little different. You really should consider another provider for cost, quality and ease of use reasons. I recently inquired about having two DSL lines at my home through AT&T (I can't get any other type of broadband service) because I wanted a dedicated line for my server/business use and one for personal use. I asked them if I could get a second line and if I could then provision service to it. They initially said yes if one account is residential and the other is business. However, during provisioning, they called and said I already had service, they refused to continue with provisioning. So you see the problem here? Is it technically possible? Yes indeed. Is it realistically possible? No.
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September 18, 2010 2:53:52 AM

You just tell them that you need an office line and now you have two lines then you go by a ( CISCO router ) not linksys linksys is bad. you can get one on ebay i would go with 800 or 1700 Series. the 1700 you can get duil adsl wic's and you set it up as one line start to slow down it will switch over to the other line. your speed test will be the same but you wont get the LAG as you run more then one program.
you can program the router to dedicated an ip for you server and when no one is on your server and you are running more then one program it will use that bandwith to or vice versa if you need help doing this email me and ill help you make a cisco

script
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September 21, 2010 8:41:41 AM

Does load balancing affect SIP line connections? I've heard that SIP trunks are not able to find their way around two IP's...?




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Network Cabling
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August 19, 2011 9:28:00 PM

rpamperin said:
You just tell them that you need an office line and now you have two lines then you go by a ( CISCO router ) not linksys linksys is bad. you can get one on ebay i would go with 800 or 1700 Series. the 1700 you can get duil adsl wic's and you set it up as one line start to slow down it will switch over to the other line. your speed test will be the same but you wont get the LAG as you run more then one program.
you can program the router to dedicated an ip for you server and when no one is on your server and you are running more then one program it will use that bandwith to or vice versa if you need help doing this email me and ill help you make a cisco

script



Hello,

I came across your post while trying to fix my parents dsl in MT where I am for the summer. I am a recently unemployed bioengineer/bioinformatician so am comfortable with all the tech in the house that has baffled them in the past. I have discovered that we have 2 dsl lines up in the house and was looking for a way to combine these two lines. While Im here it would be fine to have just 2 modems with seperate lines for upstairs and downstairs, but as it seems we will need a 2nd modem (curentlly have a westell 6100) might as well get a dual wan so it can be combined after I leave (untill then 1 line for me, 1 line for parents will work fine). Any suggestions for a good modem to purchase for this end in mind? After that is all sorted, you had said you would help another poster with a cisco script, and that would be wonderful as well! Been awhile since I've done any programming and feeling rusty :( 
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August 19, 2011 10:30:58 PM

@kmbruno -- not sure if you noticed but this thread and the last response to it were a year ago -- so not sure if you'll get a reply back !
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August 19, 2011 10:40:31 PM

Yeah i noticed, just thought it was worth a try! thanks though, think i'll be all good on my own but always nice to have someone who knows what you're doing to bounce ideas off :) 
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August 19, 2011 11:32:22 PM

kmbruno said:
Yeah i noticed, just thought it was worth a try! thanks though, think i'll be all good on my own but always nice to have someone who knows what you're doing to bounce ideas off :) 


Know what you mean but after looking at his profile and seeing this :

Quote:
Forum related info
Status : Newcomer
Points : 104
Join date : 09/17/2010
Latest message posted : 09/17/2010 at 10:53 PM
Total posts : 1


Wouldn't be expecting a reply !
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August 20, 2011 10:40:21 PM

This topic has been closed by The_Prophecy
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