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Would I benefit getting a z68 chipset over p67?

I'm planning on building a pc and I was wondering if I need the new z68 chipset as opposed to getting P67 chipset for Sandy Bridge. I don't fully understand z68 yet. All I want to be able to do is overclock my discrete (6950) gpu, overclock a i5-2500k CPU and overclock the RAM (tighten latencies). Would I benefit from a z68 chipset? Is there anything else I should know about it?
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  1. Best answer
    the z68 will support Overclocking the GPU from UEFI. You can overclock the CPU and RAM as well, Which is just what you want.
    It will also allow you to use the embedded Intel GPU or a discreet card.
    Plus, though you did not ask; SSD caching.
  2. But I can still overclock the cpu, discrete gpu and ram on the p67 chipset right? Not being able to use the intergrated gpu is no biggie for me.
  3. Correct. If you are certain you will not invoke SSD caching later on, then the P67 - more of an enthusiasts chipset - would do fine.

    I think the unwarranted salivation over the upcoming Z68 is *** Pavlovian response to some slick Intel marketing that borders on cruelty. It is what P67 should have been, at less cost, done right the first time, with full disclosure of RAM profiles.
    If this thing didn't have such amazing performance, I'd tell Intel to stick it up their buffer.
  4. Aleckazee said:
    I'm planning on building *** pc and I was wondering if I need the new z68 chipset as opposed to getting P67 chipset for Sandy Bridge. I don't fully understand z68 yet. All I want to be able to do is overclock my discrete (6950) gpu, overclock *** i5-2500k CPU and overclock the RAM (tighten latencies). Would I benefit from *** z68 chipset? Is there anything else I should know about it?


    Do you do much video transcoding? Ie. going from iPhone format to another format?
  5. no, sometimes I convert youtube videos to mp3 but that doesn't take long anyway. What does SSD caching do? I'm planning on getting a 60GB OCZ Vertex 2
  6. Intel's Smart Response technology (a.k.a. "SSD caching") allows you to use an SSD as a large cache for a regular hard drive. This improves the performance of the regular hard drive in some situations.

    To be honest, I will continue to recommend not using Smart Response until SSD prices come way down. The limited performance boost just isn't worth it.

    If you're going to get an SSD, just use it for the OS and a few of your most-used programs/games and have a regular hard drive for the rest. That will give the best overall performance.
  7. Leaps-from-Shadows said:
    Intel's Smart Response technology (a.k.a. "SSD caching") allows you to use an SSD as a large cache for a regular hard drive. This improves the performance of the regular hard drive in some situations.

    To be honest, I will continue to recommend not using Smart Response until SSD prices come way down. The limited performance boost just isn't worth it.

    If you're going to get an SSD, just use it for the OS and a few of your most-used programs/games and have a regular hard drive for the rest. That will give the best overall performance.


    Even better, just get more than 4 gigs of ram and do away with the system cache. I've always moved my cache to a non-OS drive anyway..
  8. buzznut said:
    Even better, just get more than 4 gigs of ram and do away with the system cache. I've always moved my cache to a non-OS drive anyway..
    Yeah, but S3 sleep mode doesn't work with it - a huge sacrifice.
  9. What's S3 sleep?
  10. S3 is the most common standby state. Everything is powered down but the memory until the system is resumed. Here is a list of sleep states:

    S1 - Stand By (Power On Suspend) - no system context is lost
    S2 - Stand By - CPU and system cache context is lost
    S3 - Stand By (Suspend to Ram) - system memory context is maintained, all other system context is lost
    S4 - Hibernate - Platform context is maintained.
    States S1, S2, and S3 are all various aspects of the Sleep function. If you are running an incompatible video card, some or all of these states will be unavailable.
  11. oh ok so when I press sleep on my envy it is S3 right? Hmm, that is a big sacrifice cause I use it a lot.
  12. think i might stick to p67, thanks for all the great info guys
  13. Best answer selected by aleckazee.
  14. Noworldorder said:
    S3 is the most common standby state. Everything is powered down but the memory until the system is resumed. Here is a list of sleep states:

    S1 - Stand By (Power On Suspend) - no system context is lost
    S2 - Stand By - CPU and system cache context is lost
    S3 - Stand By (Suspend to Ram) - system memory context is maintained, all other system context is lost
    S4 - Hibernate - Platform context is maintained.
    States S1, S2, and S3 are all various aspects of the Sleep function. If you are running an incompatible video card, some or all of these states will be unavailable.



    There's also this stand by: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vbg7YoXiKn0

    "Stand By Me" by Ben E. King. Worth watching.
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