Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Idiot's guide to the D70

Tags:
Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
December 24, 2004 5:39:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I used to know how to use a 35mm years ago then nothing then had a small
P&S digital & took thousands of pictures enjoying that thoroughly so I
figured I was justified in getting a nice DSLR but I really don't know
how to use it. I'm wondering if folks could share some tips here. I'm
sure I'm not the only moron with a D70.

I haven't explored the P mode yet. As I understand I should be able to
program several custom pre-programmed modes for my own purposes. For
instance, that'd let me turn off the darn flash & have a setting for
shade white balance with the exposure compensation darkened a bit. Do
people use this P setting much, am I understanding the intent?

Unfortunate that exposure compensation doesn't work in green mode. I
guess that's usable in P mode?

Why would I chose shutter priority or apeture priority? For more depth
of field I need a larger F stop which means I'm stuck with a lower
speed, right? What speed is the slowest that I could shoot hand held? I
get an awful lot of blurrred shots from shake. So I ought to set to
shutter priority in low light situations & chose what maybe 1/60 as a
max for hand held shots? Then I could adjust the exposure compensation
to underexpose & fix that in photoshop rather than lose depth of field.

Digicams are supposed to have more depth of field but maybe not so for
DSLRs, I read that's was due to the tiny CCD in cheaper digicams. If I
wanted to blur the background more I would... hmm <scratching head> I
would use a small f stop? So I'd use aperture priority 'A' mode? Should
I change the ISO for this situation in low light?

If I was shooting a moving object, I'd use shutter priority at a high
speed & accept limited depth of field if it was less than full sun? I'm
just not used to thinking about these things.

Are the other preset mode any use? I guess the flower is for macro but
am not sure what it changes. Sports, portrait (white balance for good
flesh tones?) I don't know what the other icons mean.

The D70 gives pretty washed out bland colors compared to other digicams
but there is a setting to bump up the saturation. I don't know why
anyone would want such washed out colors unless that's a more 'pure' raw
image for processing. I do a lot of work in photoshop and am much more
competent with that than I am with this camera but still it's a lot of
work to have to process every single picture. Ditto for sharpening but
my understanding is that sharpening should never be done until the final
step so I think it ought to be turned off on the camera.

I tried setting the ISO mode to auto since that's not the default but
haven't studied to see what that does. I'm pretty ignorant about the
function of the ISO setting frankly. What was it for film you'd use 100
for outdoor & 200 for indoor? Sorry my ignorance is showing, I'll bet
I'm not the only one.

How the heck do I toggle the focus across those 5 zones? I just move it
around & push the shutter half way but I think I read somewhere that the
exposure only locks partially with a shutter press & recomposition.
Sorry but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all
these things.

More about : idiot guide d70

Anonymous
December 24, 2004 8:07:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

paul <paul@not.net> writes:

> I'm
> sure I'm not the only moron with a D70.

:-> Well, I'm sure moronity isn't restricted to D-70s. I don't have a D-70,
so I can't answer questions specific to it. Other questions are more
general, so I'll take a stab.

>SNIP<
> Why would I chose shutter priority or apeture priority?

It depends. :-> Sometimes you want autoexposure, and you're trying for a
certain effect. It may be that you want shallow depth of field to blur out
a distracting background, so you've set the aperture to f/4 or so. Or
you're trying to freeze motion or let motion blur, so you've set the
shutter speed to one you want, and you're willing to take the aperture the
camera gives you. With my FM2n, which is totally manual, I'd think about
both shutterspeed and aperture, but if the subject was in motion, I'd
either have to hurry or miss the shot. With my auto-everything camera set
on aperture priority and f/8, though, I'd be pretty much set for whatever
crossed my path.

> For more depth
> of field I need a larger F stop which means I'm stuck with a lower
> speed, right?

I think you have it backwards, depending on what you mean by larger
f/stop. f/2 is a larger opening than f/16, which some think of as the
larger number -- it's a fraction. So f/2 has a narrowed depth of field, but
you could use a faster shutter speed because the aperture is open more than
with f/16.

> What speed is the slowest that I could shoot hand held? I
> get an awful lot of blurrred shots from shake.

Faster. Use a faster shutter speed. No one knows what your slowest handheld
speed is.

> So I ought to set to
> shutter priority in low light situations & chose what maybe 1/60 as a
> max for hand held shots? Then I could adjust the exposure compensation
> to underexpose & fix that in photoshop rather than lose depth of field.

Who knows? If you're really shaky, 1/60th second may not be enough. The
rule of thumb in 35mm photography is a fraction the numerator of which is
1, and the denominator of which is two times your focal length. If you're
using a 50mm lens, that means 1/120 (the closest to 1/100). For a normal
lens in 35mm, your 1/60th second wouldn't be enough for 'normal'
photographers. if you're shakey, double it again.

For a D-70, you've got either a 1.5 or 1.6 multiplication factor on top of
that. A 50mm lens appears to be a 75mm lens on some digital cameras, so
double that, then double it again: 1/250 or 1/500.

>SNIP<
> If I
> wanted to blur the background more I would... hmm <scratching head> I

Use a wider aperture. f/2 or f/4. Note that some lenses are not at their
sharpest wide open, so you have trade-offs.

> would use a small f stop? So I'd use aperture priority 'A' mode? Should
> I change the ISO for this situation in low light?

Depends on what your shutter speed is with the preferred aperture. Can you
hand hold at the preferred aperture and the indicated shutter speed?

>
> If I was shooting a moving object, I'd use shutter priority at a high
> speed & accept limited depth of field if it was less than full sun?

Depends. Generally yes, if you want to freeze motion. Notice, though, that
many photos of racers let the moving subject blur or track the subject,
blurring the background so that the viewer gets a feel of speed.

>SNIP<
> Are the other preset mode any use? I guess the flower is for macro but
> am not sure what it changes. Sports, portrait (white balance for good
> flesh tones?) I don't know what the other icons mean.

Read the manual.

>SNIP<
> I tried setting the ISO mode to auto since that's not the default but
> haven't studied to see what that does. I'm pretty ignorant about the
> function of the ISO setting frankly. What was it for film you'd use 100
> for outdoor & 200 for indoor? Sorry my ignorance is showing, I'll bet
> I'm not the only one.

You're not the only one not to read the manual. In film, I use ISO 50 slide
film for outdoors during the day, but I'm often in sunny places. I don't
have a standard film speed that I use for indoors, but I use a fill flash
(not a built-in flash -- my FM2n doesn't have a built-in flash), sometimes
two (one on the camera and a slave off the camera). On the page at
http://www.cieux.com/stbarth/lem.html
the top two photos are with a slave flash and the on-camera flash. Notice
that the interior and the sunny outside are balanced and that the light
doesn't fall off in the distance. I used ISO 50 film for these photos.

The time to use a higher ISO setting is when you can no longer handhold the
camera without a flash (and you want to). At some point, a higher ISO will
result in artifacts in the image -- blots of color that aren't there in the
real world, similar to grain which shows up in faster films. You may use
flash indoors and out in dim light, but that introduces other problems
which you didn't ask about. :->

--
Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email from this URL
http://www.cieux.com/ | http://www.civex.com/ is read daily.
December 25, 2004 2:11:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:2cOdnTBnfcQTB1HcRVn-gg@speakeasy.net...
> exposure only locks partially with a shutter press & recomposition.
> Sorry but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all
> these things.
Then why should we have the patience to answer all of your beginner
questions?
Jim
Related resources
December 25, 2004 2:11:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Jim wrote:

> "paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
> news:2cOdnTBnfcQTB1HcRVn-gg@speakeasy.net...
>
>>exposure only locks partially with a shutter press & recomposition.
>>Sorry but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all
>>these things.
>
> Then why should we have the patience to answer all of your beginner
> questions?


I gave a few tips, thought maybe someone on a similar level could share
ideas. Maybe some more expert wouldn't mind sharing what they think are
useful techniques. Maybe inspire myself out of shame to return to this
thread with more tips as I learn <grin>.

OK I'll take a stab at focusing:

I can't figure out how to use the right side sensor if my subject is to
the right. If I repeatedly press the shutter half way it seems to cycle
thru the 5 sensor areas? I can use the AF-L button to lock the focus
while the camera is moved to center the subject but as I said I thought
this also locks the exposure partially. The AF-L button is also the AE-L
button so how do I lock focus in one spot then lock exposure in another?
Hmm, it seems I could program the button in the menu to only lock
exposure then use reframing to lock focus. That'd be most sensible
because I could just point up at the sky to lock my metering with the
button & make sure it isn't blown out then lock the focus... hmm but I
have to hold the shutter half way down still to keep the exposure
locked. I still don't understand the cycling between the 5 focus sensor
zones or how to control that.

Maybe the book adm mentioned would give better explanations.
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 2:15:27 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:2cOdnTBnfcQTB1HcRVn-gg@speakeasy.net...
>I used to know how to use a 35mm years ago then nothing then had a small
>P&S digital & took thousands of pictures enjoying that thoroughly so I
>figured I was justified in getting a nice DSLR but I really don't know how
>to use it. I'm wondering if folks could share some tips here. I'm sure I'm
>not the only moron with a D70.

http://www.bythom.com/d70guide.htm
December 25, 2004 2:25:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:2cOdnTBnfcQTB1HcRVn-gg@speakeasy.net...
> I used to know how to use a 35mm years ago then nothing then had a small
> P&S digital & took thousands of pictures enjoying that thoroughly so I
> figured I was justified in getting a nice DSLR but I really don't know
> how to use it. I'm wondering if folks could share some tips here. I'm
> sure I'm not the only moron with a D70.
>
> I haven't explored the P mode yet. As I understand I should be able to
> program several custom pre-programmed modes for my own purposes. For
> instance, that'd let me turn off the darn flash & have a setting for
> shade white balance with the exposure compensation darkened a bit. Do
> people use this P setting much, am I understanding the intent?
>
> Unfortunate that exposure compensation doesn't work in green mode. I
> guess that's usable in P mode?
>
> Why would I chose shutter priority or apeture priority? For more depth
> of field I need a larger F stop which means I'm stuck with a lower
> speed, right? What speed is the slowest that I could shoot hand held? I
> get an awful lot of blurrred shots from shake. So I ought to set to
> shutter priority in low light situations & chose what maybe 1/60 as a
> max for hand held shots? Then I could adjust the exposure compensation
> to underexpose & fix that in photoshop rather than lose depth of field.
>
> Digicams are supposed to have more depth of field but maybe not so for
> DSLRs, I read that's was due to the tiny CCD in cheaper digicams. If I
> wanted to blur the background more I would... hmm <scratching head> I
> would use a small f stop? So I'd use aperture priority 'A' mode? Should
> I change the ISO for this situation in low light?
>
> If I was shooting a moving object, I'd use shutter priority at a high
> speed & accept limited depth of field if it was less than full sun? I'm
> just not used to thinking about these things.
>
> Are the other preset mode any use? I guess the flower is for macro but
> am not sure what it changes. Sports, portrait (white balance for good
> flesh tones?) I don't know what the other icons mean.
>
> The D70 gives pretty washed out bland colors compared to other digicams
> but there is a setting to bump up the saturation. I don't know why
> anyone would want such washed out colors unless that's a more 'pure' raw
> image for processing. I do a lot of work in photoshop and am much more
> competent with that than I am with this camera but still it's a lot of
> work to have to process every single picture. Ditto for sharpening but
> my understanding is that sharpening should never be done until the final
> step so I think it ought to be turned off on the camera.
>
> I tried setting the ISO mode to auto since that's not the default but
> haven't studied to see what that does. I'm pretty ignorant about the
> function of the ISO setting frankly. What was it for film you'd use 100
> for outdoor & 200 for indoor? Sorry my ignorance is showing, I'll bet
> I'm not the only one.
>
> How the heck do I toggle the focus across those 5 zones? I just move it
> around & push the shutter half way but I think I read somewhere that the
> exposure only locks partially with a shutter press & recomposition.
> Sorry but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all
> these things.

I was at a camera store today and saw a book titled "..... guide to the
D70". It might just be a glorified owners manual, but it might be a good
start for you.
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 7:33:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:39:07 -0800, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:


>Sorry but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all
>these things.

Sounds like you should return the camera, get a full refund and then
head down to your local convenience store and buy a disposal camera.
Shouldn't be too much to "read" to run that.
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 8:54:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Well, a digital SLR is not a film SLR. Sure, you can change lenses on both
of them and some of the basics are the same. But a D70 is not a replacement
for a film SLR. It's different.

You must learn the basics from either the manual or a reasonable book. There
is no other way!

If you do not like the manual that came with this camera, you should take a
closer looks at:

Magic Lantern Guides, Nikon D70, Simon Stafford, Lark books, New York
(2005).

Gregor

PS: Skip "Auto mode" and only use rarely "Program mode". "Auto mode" is junk
and "Program mode" is for the "lazy" people.

"paul" <paul@not.net> wrote in message
news:2cOdnTBnfcQTB1HcRVn-gg@speakeasy.net...
>I used to know how to use a 35mm years ago then nothing then had a small
>P&S digital & took thousands of pictures enjoying that thoroughly so I
>figured I was justified in getting a nice DSLR but I really don't know how
>to use it. I'm wondering if folks could share some tips here. I'm sure I'm
>not the only moron with a D70.
>
> I haven't explored the P mode yet. As I understand I should be able to
> program several custom pre-programmed modes for my own purposes. For
> instance, that'd let me turn off the darn flash & have a setting for shade
> white balance with the exposure compensation darkened a bit. Do people use
> this P setting much, am I understanding the intent?
>
> Unfortunate that exposure compensation doesn't work in green mode. I guess
> that's usable in P mode?
>
> Why would I chose shutter priority or apeture priority? For more depth of
> field I need a larger F stop which means I'm stuck with a lower speed,
> right? What speed is the slowest that I could shoot hand held? I get an
> awful lot of blurrred shots from shake. So I ought to set to shutter
> priority in low light situations & chose what maybe 1/60 as a max for hand
> held shots? Then I could adjust the exposure compensation to underexpose &
> fix that in photoshop rather than lose depth of field.
>
> Digicams are supposed to have more depth of field but maybe not so for
> DSLRs, I read that's was due to the tiny CCD in cheaper digicams. If I
> wanted to blur the background more I would... hmm <scratching head> I
> would use a small f stop? So I'd use aperture priority 'A' mode? Should I
> change the ISO for this situation in low light?
>
> If I was shooting a moving object, I'd use shutter priority at a high
> speed & accept limited depth of field if it was less than full sun? I'm
> just not used to thinking about these things.
>
> Are the other preset mode any use? I guess the flower is for macro but am
> not sure what it changes. Sports, portrait (white balance for good flesh
> tones?) I don't know what the other icons mean.
>
> The D70 gives pretty washed out bland colors compared to other digicams
> but there is a setting to bump up the saturation. I don't know why anyone
> would want such washed out colors unless that's a more 'pure' raw image
> for processing. I do a lot of work in photoshop and am much more competent
> with that than I am with this camera but still it's a lot of work to have
> to process every single picture. Ditto for sharpening but my understanding
> is that sharpening should never be done until the final step so I think it
> ought to be turned off on the camera.
>
> I tried setting the ISO mode to auto since that's not the default but
> haven't studied to see what that does. I'm pretty ignorant about the
> function of the ISO setting frankly. What was it for film you'd use 100
> for outdoor & 200 for indoor? Sorry my ignorance is showing, I'll bet I'm
> not the only one.
>
> How the heck do I toggle the focus across those 5 zones? I just move it
> around & push the shutter half way but I think I read somewhere that the
> exposure only locks partially with a shutter press & recomposition. Sorry
> but I just haven't had the patience to read the manual about all these
> things.
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 5:16:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>> The D70 gives pretty washed out bland colors compared to other digicams

Well, from what I've heard, other digicams tend to over saturate the colours, so
as to give more vibrant pictures. That's what people like, apparently.

The D70 is a more professional tool, and gives more realistic colours.

--
Chris Pollard


CG Internet café, Tagum City, Philippines
http://www.cginternet.net
December 26, 2004 2:03:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

paul wrote:
>
> OK I'll take a stab at focusing:
>
> I can't figure out how to use the right side sensor if my subject is to
> the right. If I repeatedly press the shutter half way it seems to cycle
> thru the 5 sensor areas? I can use the AF-L button to lock the focus
> while the camera is moved to center the subject but as I said I thought
> this also locks the exposure partially. The AF-L button is also the AE-L
> button so how do I lock focus in one spot then lock exposure in another?
> Hmm, it seems I could program the button in the menu to only lock
> exposure then use reframing to lock focus. That'd be most sensible
> because I could just point up at the sky to lock my metering with the
> button & make sure it isn't blown out then lock the focus... hmm but I
> have to hold the shutter half way down still to keep the exposure
> locked. I still don't understand the cycling between the 5 focus sensor
> zones or how to control that.
>
> Maybe the book adm mentioned would give better explanations.


OK so the way to select which of the 5 focus areas is with the round
toggle (up-down-left-right) Doh!

I set the AF-L AE-L button (in the menu) to lock focus only (no need to
continue holding down the shutter) & I think I can figure out exposure
on my own by using the exposure compensation +/- with S or A mode rather
than reframing to adjust exposure. It's really not that hard to use the
meter readings in the viewfinder in manual mode either, just confusing
that the - is on the right & + on the left. It will take a lot of
practice to remember which dial to spin which direction intuitively
since it often takes several spins before you see any effect. S & A mode
are less likely to leave you spinning the dials in confusion.

In green mode the autofocus is is 'closest object' priority mode so I
think that's why I kept seeing the focus point shifting around the 5
sensors haphazardly. The only real reason to use green mode though is if
something spontaneous happens & I don't have time to adjust anything.
The center focus sensor is the largest so if there is a tricky focus
situation it's probably best to use that, then hit the AF-L button &
re-frame.

Another trick I read about is that depth of field is greater behind the
focus point than in front so it's better to focus toward the front of an
insect for a macro than the middle.

There is still lots about the focus I don't understand with this camera
but that's enough to work with I think. Corrections, clarifications &
other techniques are welcome.
December 26, 2004 2:37:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Phil Stripling wrote:

> paul <paul@not.net> writes:
>
>
>>I'm
>>sure I'm not the only moron with a D70.
>
>
> :-> Well, I'm sure moronity isn't restricted to D-70s. I don't have a D-70,
> so I can't answer questions specific to it. Other questions are more
> general, so I'll take a stab.


Thanks Phil,
I spent a few hours boring my wife with conversation about aperture &
speed, she has some photography background (also rusty) and it helped
to just spend some time discussing back & forth to drill it home.

>
>
>>SNIP<
>>Why would I chose shutter priority or apeture priority?
>
>
> It depends. :-> Sometimes you want autoexposure, and you're trying for a
> certain effect. It may be that you want shallow depth of field to blur out
> a distracting background, so you've set the aperture to f/4 or so. Or
> you're trying to freeze motion or let motion blur, so you've set the
> shutter speed to one you want, and you're willing to take the aperture the
> camera gives you. With my FM2n, which is totally manual, I'd think about
> both shutterspeed and aperture, but if the subject was in motion, I'd
> either have to hurry or miss the shot. With my auto-everything camera set
> on aperture priority and f/8, though, I'd be pretty much set for whatever
> crossed my path.
>
>
>>For more depth
>>of field I need a larger F stop which means I'm stuck with a lower
>>speed, right?
>
>
> I think you have it backwards, depending on what you mean by larger
> f/stop. f/2 is a larger opening than f/16, which some think of as the
> larger number -- it's a fraction. So f/2 has a narrowed depth of field, but
> you could use a faster shutter speed because the aperture is open more than
> with f/16.


Good point, I meant higher number, smaller opening. It is a bit
counterintuitive.


>
>>What speed is the slowest that I could shoot hand held? I
>>get an awful lot of blurrred shots from shake.
>
>
> Faster. Use a faster shutter speed. No one knows what your slowest handheld
> speed is.
>
>
>>So I ought to set to
>>shutter priority in low light situations & chose what maybe 1/60 as a
>>max for hand held shots? Then I could adjust the exposure compensation
>>to underexpose & fix that in photoshop rather than lose depth of field.
>
>
> Who knows? If you're really shaky, 1/60th second may not be enough. The
> rule of thumb in 35mm photography is a fraction the numerator of which is
> 1, and the denominator of which is two times your focal length. If you're
> using a 50mm lens, that means 1/120 (the closest to 1/100). For a normal
> lens in 35mm, your 1/60th second wouldn't be enough for 'normal'
> photographers. if you're shakey, double it again.
>
> For a D-70, you've got either a 1.5 or 1.6 multiplication factor on top of
> that. A 50mm lens appears to be a 75mm lens on some digital cameras, so
> double that, then double it again: 1/250 or 1/500.


Wow, I read elsewhere that 1/30 is common for handheld but I sure do
have a lot of problems with shake. I'm really wishing I'd gotten the
anti-shake lense. My wife pointed out also that it can help to brace
your arm against your body to stabilize the camera. This camera (plus my
28-200 nikon lense) is a pretty poor performer in low light compared
with the old P&S digicam. I've come to understand now though that I can
increase the ISO setting way up to 1,600 to compensate though the
trade-off is more noise, a blurry pic is worthless.


>
>
>>SNIP<
>>If I
>>wanted to blur the background more I would... hmm <scratching head> I
>
>
> Use a wider aperture. f/2 or f/4. Note that some lenses are not at their
> sharpest wide open, so you have trade-offs.
>
>
>>would use a small f stop? So I'd use aperture priority 'A' mode? Should
>>I change the ISO for this situation in low light?
>
>
> Depends on what your shutter speed is with the preferred aperture. Can you
> hand hold at the preferred aperture and the indicated shutter speed?
>
>
>>If I was shooting a moving object, I'd use shutter priority at a high
>>speed & accept limited depth of field if it was less than full sun?
>
>
> Depends. Generally yes, if you want to freeze motion. Notice, though, that
> many photos of racers let the moving subject blur or track the subject,
> blurring the background so that the viewer gets a feel of speed.
>
>
>>SNIP<
>>Are the other preset mode any use? I guess the flower is for macro but
>>am not sure what it changes. Sports, portrait (white balance for good
>>flesh tones?) I don't know what the other icons mean.
>
> Read the manual.


OK I at least read about white balance & learned how to toggle. I'll
leave it on shade because that's probably the most common thing for my
work. Leving it auto I had all kinds of crazy results where two pics
shot moments apart would be blue and orange which is just a mess to
post-process.

Tap the shutter to get it out of replay mode, WB button & spin the main
wheel: incandescent, flourescent, sun, cloudy (full cloud cover), flash,
shade & pre-set. Lots of things to remember to check between turning on
the camera & shooting. It'd be easy to forget checking the white
balance. I've decided not to bother with RAW which allows adjusting
white balance later but I think curves in photoshop ought to be able to
do that also. If I leave it in shade mode I should be able to find a
curve & save that for correcting the occasional sunny shot where I
forgot to convert from shade to sun & re-use that curve.



>
>>SNIP<
>>I tried setting the ISO mode to auto since that's not the default but
>>haven't studied to see what that does. I'm pretty ignorant about the
>>function of the ISO setting frankly. What was it for film you'd use 100
>>for outdoor & 200 for indoor? Sorry my ignorance is showing, I'll bet
>>I'm not the only one.
>
>
> You're not the only one not to read the manual. In film, I use ISO 50 slide
> film for outdoors during the day, but I'm often in sunny places. I don't
> have a standard film speed that I use for indoors, but I use a fill flash
> (not a built-in flash -- my FM2n doesn't have a built-in flash), sometimes
> two (one on the camera and a slave off the camera). On the page at
> http://www.cieux.com/stbarth/lem.html
> the top two photos are with a slave flash and the on-camera flash. Notice
> that the interior and the sunny outside are balanced and that the light
> doesn't fall off in the distance. I used ISO 50 film for these photos.


It's odd that the D70 iso only goes down to 200 but way way up to 1,600.
I still am a bit confused about the relevance of digicam ISO versus film
but it seems all I need to know is what you say below: bump it up for
low light if necessary at the cost of added noise.

I fiddled with putting the ISO in auto mode but it seems you can not
override that with the ISO button even in manual mode. In the auto
setting you cannot see what it is choosing for you in the viewfinder,
only by looking at the settings in replay mode after shooting so that's
a bit out of control. I think I'll leave it in manual at 200 (default)
and just push it up for low light situations. It would be nice to have
it in auto for green mode for candid shots but I don't understand how it
works even after reading the manual.


>
> The time to use a higher ISO setting is when you can no longer handhold the
> camera without a flash (and you want to). At some point, a higher ISO will
> result in artifacts in the image -- blots of color that aren't there in the
> real world, similar to grain which shows up in faster films. You may use
> flash indoors and out in dim light, but that introduces other problems
> which you didn't ask about. :->
>
December 28, 2004 8:14:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Today's tip: When previewing a picture you just shot, hold down the ISO
button & spin the main command dial. That almost doubles the zoom & is
quicker to pan around.
January 12, 2005 12:36:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for answering, I'm learning a lot but really many things I don't
know as I have little experience other than shooting on auto in the
past. I'm willing to learn though, it's fun having control of all these
options.


Ken Tough wrote:
>
> ...select different
> flash options (press the flash button next to the flash and spin
> the main wheel). The 'slow' mode might be useful for you; it lets
> you use slow shutter speeds and fire the flash late, which reduces
> the amount of flash input (at the expense of subject movement).
> Using the 'back curtain' option can make nice shots with the subject
> frozen at the end of a motion blur.
>
> Also, try pressing flash button and spinning sub-command wheel. If
> you reduce the flash input, say -3EV, it will only provide a nice
> subtle fill. If your shutter speed needs to be <60, then you must
> select SLOW flash mode to avoid a complete flash exposure though.


Ah, thanks for explaining those flash options, I hadn't even thought
about it. SLOW doesn't seem to be an option in manual, I don't really
understand what slow does. Normal presumably flashes in the beginning,
REAR at the end.


>
> ...shifting the AF zone around.

I figured out the default setting is closest object mode. I just set it
to focus on the center & move to the sides if needed. It seemed too
unpredictably hunting around on closest.


> I did forgot to set AF-C when shooting action on the weekend
> though, so the idiot mode could have been useful there. I'm learning.


I don't shoot action much, I guess that's if I'm trying to track someone
ice skating or a bird or animal moving around or a car driving towards
me. As I recall you need to dig into the menu to set that, I'll probably
never remember especially if it's a bird that happens to appear suddenly
while I'm shooting landscapes.


>
> If you like vivid, you'll find the imaging options in custom settings
> to be useful. Don't forget you're just used to CNN-isation of images
> by those newfangled really saturated colour films, like Fuji made
> popular. Old Kodachrome shooters will like the reality of it. It
> does take a lot of thinking to remember to dial down the contrast
> in conditions of high light/dark, get the saturation right etc.


I'm new to handling a complex camera but I am pretty good in photoshop
so I dialed down all the sharpening & contrast adjustments to get a more
raw image though I do like rich colors so I pushed saturation up because
I never want the dull colors that come out by default.

If I need to increase contrast that's better done with curves in PS
later (since the camera does it with software anyways) but it seems it
ought to be possible with a digital camera to shoot at decreased
contrast. I don't know the physics but I imagine it ought to be possible
and would be able to capture more useful images. I guess this was done
with filters in the past but surely it can be built into the CCD
sensitivity some how. Maybe not.
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 2:46:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Ken Tough wrote:

> P mode is sortof an auto-priority mode, which uses its judgement
> (well, tables really) to select a shutter/aperature combination
> best for the available condition.

It's on page 78 in the user manual.

--
Joe Makowiec
http://makowiec.org/
Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
January 12, 2005 2:46:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Joe Makowiec wrote:

> On 12 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Ken Tough wrote:
>
>
>>P mode is sortof an auto-priority mode, which uses its judgement
>>(well, tables really) to select a shutter/aperature combination
>>best for the available condition.
>
>
> It's on page 78 in the user manual.


Hmm, I still don't get the difference between Auto (green) and Program
but whatever, I'm getting used to manual as it forces me to decide what
I want rather than being dissapointed later. Program doesn't suggest
flash is all I can tell.

Somehow adjusting the EV + - is so akward it just seems more intuitive
to go manual & spin the dials. On my old oly I always shot in Auto but
used the EV to make adjustments but it has a lot to do with what is
physically more comfortable.
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 3:51:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:37:05 -0800, in rec.photo.digital paul
<paul@not.net> wrote:

>Hmm, I still don't get the difference between Auto (green) and Program
>but whatever, I'm getting used to manual as it forces me to decide what
>I want rather than being dissapointed later. Program doesn't suggest
>flash is all I can tell.

Auto applies a lot of in image content specific (sharpness, contrast,
saturation, etc)camera adjustments to the image, over which you have
no control. In Pmode your explicit settings, I use none, are used.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 3:55:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:36:51 -0800, in rec.photo.digital paul
<paul@not.net> wrote:

>> I did forgot to set AF-C when shooting action on the weekend
>> though, so the idiot mode could have been useful there. I'm learning.
>
>
>I don't shoot action much, I guess that's if I'm trying to track someone
>ice skating or a bird or animal moving around or a car driving towards
>me. As I recall you need to dig into the menu to set that, I'll probably
>never remember especially if it's a bird that happens to appear suddenly
>while I'm shooting landscapes.

One caveat you need to be aware of with AF-C is that in this mode the
image does not have to be in focus for the shutter to release.

________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 8:55:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:37:05 -0800, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:

>Joe Makowiec wrote:
>
>> On 12 Jan 2005 in rec.photo.digital, Ken Tough wrote:
>>
>>
>>>P mode is sortof an auto-priority mode, which uses its judgement
>>>(well, tables really) to select a shutter/aperature combination
>>>best for the available condition.
>>
>>
>> It's on page 78 in the user manual.
>
>
>Hmm, I still don't get the difference between Auto (green) and Program
>but whatever, I'm getting used to manual as it forces me to decide what
>I want rather than being dissapointed later. Program doesn't suggest
>flash is all I can tell.

I switch to Auto (green) if I want to quickly get into closest
subject focus mode. I used to do this trying to track birds in flight,
but it turns out manual focus has a better hit-rate. Thinking about
this some more, I should have used SPORTS because of it's continuous
AF mode and a low DOF wouldn't be a problem.

--
Owamanga!
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 12:56:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:37:05 -0800, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:

I'm another recent D70 owner, so I'm still stumbling around getting used to
things myself, but here's my 2p worth:

>
>Hmm, I still don't get the difference between Auto (green) and Program
>but whatever, I'm getting used to manual as it forces me to decide what
>I want rather than being dissapointed later. Program doesn't suggest
>flash is all I can tell.

As Ed Ruf says in another response, Auto sets lots of other camera
adjustments for you.

The other main difference is that Auto will use (or not) the flash as it
sees fit, whereas Program mode will use the (built-in) flash if it's
popped-up but not if it's pressed down. However, if Custom Setting #20 is
on (it is by default), then the flash indicator in the viewfinder will
blink if it thinks you could do with the flash.

I more or less avoided Auto mode, and started with Program mode for a bit.
I'm now starting to play around with Shutter and Aperture priority modes.


>
>Somehow adjusting the EV + - is so akward it just seems more intuitive
>to go manual & spin the dials. On my old oly I always shot in Auto but
>used the EV to make adjustments but it has a lot to do with what is
>physically more comfortable.

In case you hadn't spotted, one of the custom settings (#10?) allows you to
adjust the EV without having to press the little "+/-" button, if that
helps.

Regards,
Graham Holden (g-holden AT dircon DOT co DOT uk)
--
There are 10 types of people in the world;
those that understand binary and those that don't.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 12:56:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:56:16 +0000, in rec.photo.digital Graham Holden
<look@bottom.of.post> wrote:

>On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 09:37:05 -0800, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>>Somehow adjusting the EV + - is so akward it just seems more intuitive
>>to go manual & spin the dials. On my old oly I always shot in Auto but
>>used the EV to make adjustments but it has a lot to do with what is
>>physically more comfortable.
>
>In case you hadn't spotted, one of the custom settings (#10?) allows you to
>adjust the EV without having to press the little "+/-" button, if that
>helps.

But you still have to press the +/- button if you want to see the EV
setting. From I can tell doing the above really isn't much different
than using fully manual mode, expect maybe changing the of the change
in either shutter speed or aperture with each click of the dial.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 6:15:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:18:18 -0500, Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:

>But you still have to press the +/- button if you want to see the EV
>setting. From I can tell doing the above really isn't much different
>than using fully manual mode, expect maybe changing the of the change
>in either shutter speed or aperture with each click of the dial.

Yes, that is slightly annoying. I didn't make the suggestion on the basis
it was a perfect solution; more because there's so much you _can_ do with
the D70, that it's easy to overlook one of the options available... I was
just making sure Paul was aware that it existed.

Regards,
Graham Holden (g-holden AT dircon DOT co DOT uk)
--
There are 10 types of people in the world;
those that understand binary and those that don't.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 6:15:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:15:56 +0000, in rec.photo.digital Graham Holden
<look@bottom.of.post> wrote:

>On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:18:18 -0500, Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>
>>But you still have to press the +/- button if you want to see the EV
>>setting. From I can tell doing the above really isn't much different
>>than using fully manual mode, expect maybe changing the of the change
>>in either shutter speed or aperture with each click of the dial.
>
>Yes, that is slightly annoying. I didn't make the suggestion on the basis
>it was a perfect solution; more because there's so much you _can_ do with
>the D70, that it's easy to overlook one of the options available... I was
>just making sure Paul was aware that it existed.

No problem. Like many of the options some may not completely make
sense depending upon what platform you're moving from. The push button
default behavior is exactly what I've been used to for years with my
990 and 5700. One I'm still having problem with is on these there is
only one command dial, so in A or S mode it controls either. The D70
has two dials and while you can switch there function, you can't get
this single behavior. I get caught after using the 990/5700 a while
when going back to the D70.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 7:28:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

paul <paul@not.net> wrote:

>Ah, thanks for explaining those flash options, I hadn't even thought
>about it. SLOW doesn't seem to be an option in manual, I don't really
>understand what slow does. Normal presumably flashes in the beginning,
>REAR at the end.

SLOW is only available in P and A modes (pages 95 and 98). I assume
it is front-curtain vs REAR curtain. The diff from front-curtain sync
mode (nothing in the flash mode indicator) is that it allows shutter
speeds <60, whereas front-curtain sync clips the shutter speed to 60
and will up the flash output for exposure.

I'll grant you that's not entirely clear in the manual.

>I figured out the default setting is closest object mode. I just set it
>to focus on the center & move to the sides if needed. It seemed too
>unpredictably hunting around on closest.

I don't know why it ought to assume that the closest thing is what
you want focussed. I suppose for p&s-ers, that would be right. For
me it would be too annoying.

>> I did forgot to set AF-C when shooting action on the weekend
>> though, so the idiot mode could have been useful there. I'm learning.

>I don't shoot action much, I guess that's if I'm trying to track someone
>ice skating or a bird or animal moving around or a car driving towards
>me. As I recall you need to dig into the menu to set that, I'll probably
>never remember especially if it's a bird that happens to appear suddenly
>while I'm shooting landscapes.

You could go to the 'sport' mode if you need to do it quick. That
would bugger around with other things, but may be your best option
depending on how much set-up time you've got.

>If I need to increase contrast that's better done with curves in PS
>later (since the camera does it with software anyways) but it seems it
>ought to be possible with a digital camera to shoot at decreased
>contrast. I don't know the physics but I imagine it ought to be possible
>and would be able to capture more useful images. I guess this was done
>with filters in the past but surely it can be built into the CCD
>sensitivity some how. Maybe not.

The way I understand it, the contrast adjustment applies only to JPG
and the mapping between raw data and the encoding in JPG (with curves
as you say). Why aren't you shooting raw, sounds like you could manage
it, and it is the way to get the sensor output without mangling. If
you compress the contrast in JPG then expand later in Photoshop, it's
losing a lot of info. As I understand it, there is no way to reduce
the contrast at the sensor; the problem is squeezing those 12 (more?)
bits into 8 for JPG.

I suppose technically it could use different amplification at different
parts of the image (like varying ISO across the sensor).. that might
be nice actually, a digital ND grad. (Though bracketing and composing
off-line is maybe just as easy).

--
Ken Tough
January 13, 2005 7:28:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ken Tough wrote:

> paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>
>>If I need to increase contrast that's better done with curves in PS
>>later (since the camera does it with software anyways) but it seems it
>>ought to be possible with a digital camera to shoot at decreased
>>contrast. I don't know the physics but I imagine it ought to be possible
>>and would be able to capture more useful images. I guess this was done
>>with filters in the past but surely it can be built into the CCD
>>sensitivity some how. Maybe not.
>
>
> The way I understand it, the contrast adjustment applies only to JPG
> and the mapping between raw data and the encoding in JPG (with curves
> as you say). Why aren't you shooting raw, sounds like you could manage
> it, and it is the way to get the sensor output without mangling. If
> you compress the contrast in JPG then expand later in Photoshop, it's
> losing a lot of info. As I understand it, there is no way to reduce
> the contrast at the sensor; the problem is squeezing those 12 (more?)
> bits into 8 for JPG.
>
> I suppose technically it could use different amplification at different
> parts of the image (like varying ISO across the sensor).. that might
> be nice actually, a digital ND grad. (Though bracketing and composing
> off-line is maybe just as easy).


It is possible to load custom curves:
http://members.aol.com/bhaber/D70/lessons.html
Though I suppose this is the same as applying a curve in photoshop later
and is more useful for the point & shoot crowd.

Yes I really should start shooting RAW, I just can't bring myself to
burn to CDs every time I shoot since I take a lot of pictures & use a
laptop with limited HD space. But yes I do a lot of photoshop work so I
could definitely benefit from RAW, it just adds a lot more hassle to the
workflow.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 7:28:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 10:08:08 -0800, in rec.photo.digital paul
<paul@not.net> wrote:

>Yes I really should start shooting RAW, I just can't bring myself to
>burn to CDs every time I shoot since I take a lot of pictures & use a
>laptop with limited HD space. But yes I do a lot of photoshop work so I
>could definitely benefit from RAW, it just adds a lot more hassle to the
>workflow.

Don't forget about external drives, USB2 or Firewire.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 7:30:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:

><paul@not.net> wrote:
>>> I did forgot to set AF-C when shooting action on the weekend
>>> though, so the idiot mode could have been useful there. I'm learning.

>>I don't shoot action much, I guess that's if I'm trying to track someone
>>ice skating or a bird or animal moving around or a car driving towards
>>me. As I recall you need to dig into the menu to set that, I'll probably
>>never remember especially if it's a bird that happens to appear suddenly
>>while I'm shooting landscapes.
>
>One caveat you need to be aware of with AF-C is that in this mode the
>image does not have to be in focus for the shutter to release.

Though in a lot of ways that makes sense, because for 'action' it's
the instant it fires that matters; getting a focussed shot of a pool
surface after the diver has gone under is the joys of the p&s..
--
Ken Tough
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 7:30:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 16:30:13 +0200, in rec.photo.digital Ken Tough
<ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote:


>Though in a lot of ways that makes sense, because for 'action' it's
>the instant it fires that matters; getting a focussed shot of a pool
>surface after the diver has gone under is the joys of the p&s..

True, though an out of focus shot is no better either. Especially, if
you shooting very long focal lengths hand held, as I do a lot. You
just need to be aware of the caveats and limitations of the modes.
Closest focus included.
________________________________________________________
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://EdwardGRuf.com
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 8:53:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 12:29:45 -0500, Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net>
wrote:

>On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 16:30:13 +0200, in rec.photo.digital Ken Tough
><ken@objectech.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>>Though in a lot of ways that makes sense, because for 'action' it's
>>the instant it fires that matters; getting a focussed shot of a pool
>>surface after the diver has gone under is the joys of the p&s..
>
>True, though an out of focus shot is no better either. Especially, if
>you shooting very long focal lengths hand held, as I do a lot. You
>just need to be aware of the caveats and limitations of the modes.
>Closest focus included.

When we get the hacked firmware sorted we'll be able to define what
each mode does ourself. All of these modes currently have at least one
annoying thing they set that goes against the way I want to use the
camera.

I'd much rather they had been programmable configurations. What should
happen is that when you are in sports mode for example, you go to the
custom menu and set it up how you want *when in sports mode*. Now move
to portrait mode and set the custom menu to what you want it to be
*when in portrait mode* and so on... For things like shutter/apeture
priority, metering type, ISO, file type etc, you'd tell the camera
whether switching to that mode should force a change or leave it as
currently set.

So, I'd have something like:

Mode 'little man running': ISO 800, closest subject focus, shutter
lock until focused, shutter priority, no flash popup. RAW+B

Mode 'girl with hat': ISO 100*, selected focus point only, shutter
lock until focused, aperture priority, flash popup, spot metering.
Shutter speed range 1/60th to 1/8000th. FINE JPEG, white balance:
shade.

Mode 'flower': ISO 200, matrix metering, manual shutter/apeture, no
flash popup. RAW+B

...etc.

Of course, switching modes would briefly display on the LCD a list of
the major settings and a textual description of the mode you've
designed.

...hacked firmware is the solution. :-)

* of course, we'd have ISO 100 on the hacked firmware.

--
Owamanga!
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 2:35:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 12:27:17 -0500, Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:

>No problem. Like many of the options some may not completely make
>sense depending upon what platform you're moving from. The push button
>default behavior is exactly what I've been used to for years with my
>990 and 5700. One I'm still having problem with is on these there is
>only one command dial, so in A or S mode it controls either. The D70
>has two dials and while you can switch there function, you can't get
>this single behavior. I get caught after using the 990/5700 a while
>when going back to the D70.

In my case, the D70 is my first SLR, or indeed "serious" camera to speak
of. I also would like a mode where the rear-dial does something like:

P adjust shutter/aperture combination
(as it does now)

A choose desired aperture

S choose desired shutter speed

This would mean the rear dial always controls "the thing under my control"
and would free the front-dial for, say, exposure compensation whatever the
mode.

Regards,
Graham Holden (g-holden AT dircon DOT co DOT uk)
--
There are 10 types of people in the world;
those that understand binary and those that don't.
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 7:30:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 14 Jan 2005 11:35:50 +0000, in rec.photo.digital Graham Holden
<look@bottom.of.post> wrote:
>In my case, the D70 is my first SLR, or indeed "serious" camera to speak
>of. I also would like a mode where the rear-dial does something like:
>
> P adjust shutter/aperture combination
> (as it does now)
>
> A choose desired aperture
>
> S choose desired shutter speed
>
>This would mean the rear dial always controls "the thing under my control"
>and would free the front-dial for, say, exposure compensation whatever the
>mode.

I must not have been clear. That is exactly how the 990 and 5700 are as
they only have the one dial. I does complicate things for full manual
operation though. I think is how the D70 follows the film slr system.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
!