Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Raid 10 - 4 harddisks makes 2 TB?

Last response: in Storage
Share
October 15, 2012 2:25:26 PM

Hi!

I bougt 4 identical harddisks with hardware RAID support (MSI mainboard) and now I configured RAID on my 1 TB harddisks (4 times) and when the configuration is done, the BIOS screen says that there is 2 TB available, is that right? Or should there just be 1 tb?

Thanks for your help!

More about : raid harddisks makes

a c 292 G Storage
October 15, 2012 6:27:21 PM

Two TB is right. I'm a little fuzzy on whether 0 or 1 is done at the lower level. If 1 is, you have two pairs of "mirrored" drives - whatever is written to one drive in the pair is mirrored to the other, so that if one fails the other has everything.

These two 1 TB pairs are then combined into a 2 TB RAID0.

If it's the other way around, two drives are combined into a 2 TB RAID0, the other two into another, and then the two 2 TB pairs are mirrored.

Obligatory warning: RAID is not a substitute for backups.
October 15, 2012 8:51:38 PM

Thanks for the reply!

I am using RAID 10 actually, and if I am understanding your reply well, even when it's RAID 10, it's still correct that it says there is 2 TB available right?
Related resources
October 15, 2012 8:51:46 PM

can be deleted
October 15, 2012 8:51:59 PM

Sorry for this second post, something went wrong with posting :(  now I got three the same postst so I edited this post and it can be deleted if you ask me..
a c 81 G Storage
October 15, 2012 9:42:02 PM

It 2 drives striped(raid 0) giving you 2 TB. This 2 drive raid is then put together in a mirror of 2 other drives (raid 1). This gives you some increased performance along with disk redundancy. You can lose any drive, and still operate. You can lose 2 drives as long as those are in the same mirror.

2 TB is correct.
October 15, 2012 9:43:40 PM

Great! Thanks a lot for the replies!
a b G Storage
October 15, 2012 9:51:49 PM

true RAID is Redundant and was designed for backup. RAID5 and RAID6 provide speed, safety, and even predictability (with amultiple parity drives on RAID6). Anyone with 3 or more drives should be running RAID5 if possible.

RAID0 has become an attrociously common consumer grade trick to get better performance while sacrificing safety.

P.S. I used RAID0, RAID5, and RAID6
P.P.S. RAID 0+1 or 1+0 (i.e. "10") will be 2TB
October 15, 2012 9:53:30 PM

So you advice RAID 5 or 6 above RAID 10?
a b G Storage
October 15, 2012 10:09:03 PM

If your hardware can truely support it. Ideally RAID5 will have the capacity of 3TB, the speed of 4 drives and if one drive dies you can swap it out and keep your data. RAID6 is the same as 5 but it can use multiple Parity drives and pretty rare on the consumer side.
a b G Storage
October 15, 2012 10:44:58 PM

Erjen said:
Hi!

I bougt 4 identical harddisks with hardware RAID support (MSI mainboard) and now I configured RAID on my 1 TB harddisks (4 times) and when the configuration is done, the BIOS screen says that there is 2 TB available, is that right? Or should there just be 1 tb?

Thanks for your help!


Your MB RAID is not a hardware raid - it's a hardware assist RAID.

Using RAID10 on hardware assist is good call - cuz there are not much of calculation. but lost 50% of space

But with RAID5/6 then recommend to use hardware raid, where the parity is single or dual drives, regardless # of drives
October 15, 2012 10:50:00 PM

I much prefer RAID5, a good mix of speed and reliability
a b G Storage
October 15, 2012 10:55:02 PM

kitsunestarwind said:
I much prefer RAID5, a good mix of speed and reliability

+1 - but need to be hw raid
October 16, 2012 9:40:07 AM

FireWire2 said:
Your MB RAID is not a hardware raid - it's a hardware assist RAID.

Using RAID10 on hardware assist is good call - cuz there are not much of calculation. but lost 50% of space

But with RAID5/6 then recommend to use hardware raid, where the parity is single or dual drives, regardless # of drives


Thank you all and thank you FireWire2, that explained a lot :) 
a c 292 G Storage
October 16, 2012 12:45:42 PM

RAID was _not_ designed for backup. Proper RAID, anything but RAID 0, increases system reliability by being able to preserve and use all of the data if one or more drives fail. Several RAID levels can also increase overall speed.

But backups are still needed. A machine with a RAID array is still vulnerable to data loss due to malware attack, rain coming in the window or from the fire sprinklers, or my favorite, a three-year-old deciding to bang the machine on the wall. (didn't happen to me; it was another member here).
!