Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Corsair Force 3 help with speed

Last response: in Storage
Share
October 19, 2012 12:00:14 AM

Is a Sata 3 controller built into your motherboard? Are the controllers hardware based, software based, or a combination of both?

I bought a Corsair Force 3 SSD and want to reach it's full 550 mb/s performance, or close to it at least, on an ASUS Rampage 3 Formula motherboard.

Currently getting only 301 mb/s in HD Tune.

More about : corsair force speed

a c 486 V Motherboard
a c 144 G Storage
October 19, 2012 2:26:10 AM

No way you can get the full speed from your MB which is the X58. It has SATAIII from Marvell and the SATA II from intel. If you want to get better SSD benchmark you can use the Marvell, if you need better real world performance then use the Intel SATAII (but mot much better than the Marvell). You can google " Marvell SATA vs Intel SATA" to see why.

If you want to full performance you need get the new MB with the Intel SATA III port like the Z77 or old model Z68.

Sorry cuzzin chizzy.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a c 298 G Storage
October 19, 2012 3:14:07 AM

One of the first SATA 3 6Gb/s controllers was the Marvell 88SE91XX series. Your Intel based motherboard with the AX58 chipset has the Marvell 88SE9128 controller from that series. The motherboard was released when the SATA 3 standard was first adopted. Those early controllers only had a 1x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus which limited performance. That is why Asus published the motherboard supported hard disk drives but not ssd's. The ssd's worked but there was a big performance hit. Intel evaluated the situation and recommended use of their onboard Intel SATA 2 3Gb/s controller for better performance. Tom's Hardware published a review which mentioned it also. In January 2012 Marvel finally released their 88SE92XX series which used a 2x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus. The use of 2 lanes raised ssd performance to Intel levels. Well, almost Intel levels.

The general rule of thumb is use a modern Intel based motherboard with Intel chipsets and drivers for optimal SATA 3 6Gb/s ssd performance.
m
0
l
Related resources
October 19, 2012 10:39:04 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
One of the first SATA 3 6Gb/s controllers was the Marvell 88SE91XX series. Your Intel based motherboard with the AX58 chipset has the Marvell 88SE9128 controller from that series. The motherboard was released when the SATA 3 standard was first adopted. Those early controllers only had a 1x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus which limited performance. That is why Asus published the motherboard supported hard disk drives but not ssd's. The ssd's worked but there was a big performance hit. Intel evaluated the situation and recommended use of their onboard Intel SATA 2 3Gb/s controller for better performance. Tom's Hardware published a review which mentioned it also. In January 2012 Marvel finally released their 88SE92XX series which used a 2x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus. The use of 2 lanes raised ssd performance to Intel levels. Well, almost Intel levels.

The general rule of thumb is use a modern Intel based motherboard with Intel chipsets and drivers for optimal SATA 3 6Gb/s ssd performance.



So by installing 92xx drivers I would see performance improvement? Or can I use Intel ICH10R?
Man , bought my rig last year around march, was z77 out then, should have done more research.
m
0
l
a c 180 V Motherboard
a c 119 G Storage
October 19, 2012 11:18:05 PM

Silverstone PCI-E to SATA Add-On Card Model SST-EC05 $35

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I don't know if you want to try a pci-e addon card but they do work and this one has a Marvell controller with the 9130 version. I have used addon cards before since I too had a X-58 MB and wanted higher speeds from the SSD , these cards do work and you can have the boot drive connected to it. It would be a good idea to install it and load the drivers first before connecting the SSD to it so you don't have issues with booting and it not being recognized.
m
0
l
October 20, 2012 12:22:01 AM

Is any of this really anything to worry about?

Say for example I decided to buy a z77 mb and an ivy bridge and had newer sata 3 6gb/s ports to use my ssd's on. Would the time and money spent give me any noticeable real world performance gains. Or would I have just spent a bunch of money expecting a huge difference in daily usage performance and be disappointed that it didn't really seem any better? I don't really care that much about benchmarks.

My current rig is:
ASUS RAMPAGE III Formula
Intel i7 960 @ 3.2
Corsair Dominator 12GB
EVGA GTX 670 FTW

m
0
l
a c 486 V Motherboard
a c 144 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:18:02 AM

I will say don't spend more money for the benchmark score. In real usage you cannot feel the small difference between SATAII and SATAIII.

From what I see your PC, you can keep it for years until the whole new PC hardwares come out to update them.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a c 298 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:31:26 AM

You cannot load drivers for a newer Marvel 92XX controller and expect it to work with an older 91XX controller on an old motherboard. It doesn't work that way. Even if it did work you would still experience a performance hit because the old 91XX controllers only had a 1x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus which greatly limited performance.

inzone - link might be broken. It is taking me to newegg homepage.
m
0
l
a c 180 V Motherboard
a c 119 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:39:51 AM

I think that the real questiion that should be asked is what do you use your Pc for?
For everyday casual use you should stay with what you have it's a very good setup and looks like it works very well for a variety of everyday use.
If used for gaming mostly then you can stay with what you have because you have a top quality video card and a very good cpu with more then enough ram and the hard drive does not play much of a part in gaming.
If you do video encoding and 3d modeling along with audio encoding and video rendering and you are using this daily for work purposes then yes get a ne motherboard and cpu and more ram along with the SSD.
Once Haswell comes out next year you can look at that for a possible upgrade
m
0
l
a c 180 V Motherboard
a c 119 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:42:19 AM

Yes I see, I wonder why it does that. I have noticed that it happens to a lot of links from other people as well.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a c 298 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:45:55 AM

inzone said:
Yes I see, I wonder why it does that. I have noticed that it happens to a lot of links from other people as well.



If you are doing a simple cut and paste from another post, then the URL is incomplete or compressed. You have to click on edit message and copy the entire URL.
m
0
l
a c 180 V Motherboard
a c 119 G Storage
October 20, 2012 1:47:37 AM

No I'm just copying the url from the address bar on the site.
m
0
l
October 20, 2012 3:30:52 AM

JohnnyLucky said:
You cannot load drivers for a newer Marvel 92XX controller and expect it to work with an older 91XX controller on an old motherboard. It doesn't work that way. Even if it did work you would still experience a performance hit because the old 91XX controllers only had a 1x lane PCI-e 2.0 bus which greatly limited performance.

inzone - link might be broken. It is taking me to newegg homepage.


Yeah I was just reading more about that and kinda figured out a little more about it. I thought before that the controller WAS the driver, and didn't realize that it was more like an actual hardware based chip.

Yeah it would be like trying to load quad core chipset drivers for a dual core. Pointless.

Sometimes I get frustrated with mistakes I've made in this build. I guess I should be more patient with the process. This is only my second build and every "mistake" could just as easily be looked at as a learning experience that could lead to a much better build in a few years.
m
0
l
October 20, 2012 3:37:49 AM

inzone said:
I think that the real questiion that should be asked is what do you use your Pc for?
For everyday casual use you should stay with what you have it's a very good setup and looks like it works very well for a variety of everyday use.
If used for gaming mostly then you can stay with what you have because you have a top quality video card and a very good cpu with more then enough ram and the hard drive does not play much of a part in gaming.
If you do video encoding and 3d modeling along with audio encoding and video rendering and you are using this daily for work purposes then yes get a ne motherboard and cpu and more ram along with the SSD.
Once Haswell comes out next year you can look at that for a possible upgrade



I mostly use it for gaming, browsing the interweb, recording music in various DAWs, and occasionally editing video in Adobe Premier and After Effects. I do plan on doing more of the latter in the future but right now it's not a job.

I do however use East West VST instrument software with Cubase 6 for recording and the loading of the different instruments every time I open a project is the slowest process of my whole system so far.

I'm loading instruments from a 1TB WD Caviar Blue through SATA 2, and it takes a while every time I open the projects. They are very large audio files. Kinda want to get a SSD for these instruments but, 2 grand is a little more than I want to pay for a 1TB SSD.
m
0
l
October 20, 2012 3:45:53 AM

So is the 300mb/s the most I can get from my setup or is there maybe a tweak or something that I can do to get me a little more bang for my buck. I saw a post somewhere about 5GB/s on Marvell Sata 3 with 91xx, maybe achieving speeds of up to 450 mb/s data transfer.

m
0
l
a c 180 V Motherboard
a c 119 G Storage
October 20, 2012 4:57:09 AM

With connecting to the Sata 2 controller you are locked into that data speed and there's no way around it. You can try the addon card which will give you a Sata 3 port to connect to and you can end up with speeds in between the Sata2 and Sata3 onboard controllers.
There is one option that will work but it's rather expensive for a hard drive and that is the OCZ RevoDrive. I have actually owned a couple of them over the years and they are bootable so you can use them as the OS drive and the speeds are up past a standard SSD and they can get downright outrageous. They are actually a SSD that is set onto a PCB and it plugs right into a x4 Pci-e slot and bypasses the Sata controller all together. They would be an ideal solution for someone that had a need for the super fast read and write times they offer.
m
0
l
!