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Can ATI handle Video editing?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 25, 2010 4:14:07 AM

I know for a fact the When i comes to HD Video editing, the CPU usually does the work. But of course the video card helps too right?
So, i was wondering. Will an ATI HD 5770 do the job? my first choice was an GTS 250, then A GTX 470, then finally a GTX 260 but they ran out of stock. Anyway, there is also a dilemma on my proccy since its just an Core 2 Duo E7400 2.8ghz, Although i am planning to get a Quad core soon, this proccy would be temporary to any of these vid cards.

my main question is.

ATI - all play no work? or can it handle both?

Nvidia - with its fancy CUDA and openCL stuff, can it handle all work? then maybe a little play? depending on the series right?

thanks guys.
a c 189 U Graphics card
June 25, 2010 4:23:17 AM

Any cards recently would be good for video editing, don't worry about that...
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a b U Graphics card
June 25, 2010 4:44:20 AM

nVidia doesn't have any special fancy OpenCL stuff, and Cuda is similar to Stream.

What application are you using, some favour one or the other, both can accelerate video encoding and some editing functions. However it depends on the tool you're using.

Under a standardized platform the difference isn't really that big when both are allowed to play;
http://www.guru3d.com/article/radeon-hd-5570-review/19


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June 25, 2010 4:46:06 AM

as of now since i am a beginner i use magix movie edit pro 15, but on the future maybe sony vegas pro 9 or adobe premier pro
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Best solution

a b U Graphics card
June 25, 2010 5:01:12 AM

Magix will make no difference, but Vegas has better AMD plug-ins, Adobe (only in CS5) has MPE with 1 out of the 3 features getting some acceleration with nV Quadro cards and the GTX285 (but not for the nV cards you have listed without a hack) with all of the other features being OpenGL (not CL) accelerated for both platforms. So it depends on the version if you're using an older version, and if you take too long moving to Adobe, then you are likely to find CS6 move to OpenCL for both as Adobe has already said is their plan but they hadn't an option since OpenCL took so long in coming they couldn't develop for it.

Most video editing won't require much grunt work unless you're doing multiple streams/layers, so unless you know the specific need look for the features you like the most from what's available.

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June 25, 2010 5:08:01 AM

Best answer selected by mastersaofan.
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