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bloomfield vs. westmere [xeon processor]

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October 11, 2010 3:58:40 AM

Im looking at two different quad-core xeons on 1366 mobos one is bloomfield the other is westmere.

What are your opinions between the two (in terms of quality, reliability, and performance)?

Any help is appreciated.
a b à CPUs
October 11, 2010 5:04:48 AM

As far as I know, both of them are desktop variants.Yorkfield is LGA 775 and Lynnfield is LGA 1156.
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a b à CPUs
October 11, 2010 9:01:02 AM

+1. There are Xeon variants of Yorkfield and Lynnfield, but neither of them are on 1366 mobo's.
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October 11, 2010 6:27:23 PM

Just realized I was looking at 775 cpus >_<

In that case, what are your opinions on bloomfield vs westmere?
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a b à CPUs
October 11, 2010 7:21:04 PM

Some background on what you are trying to achieve might be helpful.
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October 12, 2010 1:18:24 AM

Dedicated Servers, webhost, VPS units, VPN's, number crunchers, etc.

The ones I've been building have had 100TB disk space, 2 quad/six-core processors, and a minimum of 24-48 gigs of ram. High-end machines.
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a b à CPUs
October 12, 2010 6:45:38 AM

I don't think that LGA 775 six-core processors are available.You can have a quad core processor at most with LGA 775
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October 12, 2010 7:11:20 AM

From what I understand you want to upgrade the entire platform, right?
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October 13, 2010 1:17:28 AM

dEAne I'm not buying a pre-manufactured server so that is irrelevant.

Tamz, westmere and bloomfield make LGA 1366 processors.

Herr, yes this is for new builds.
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a b à CPUs
October 13, 2010 2:06:30 AM

Quote:

Tamz, westmere and bloomfield make LGA 1366 processors.

Intel makes those. Westmere and Bloomfield are die/architecture revisions.

As far as the differences goes, Westmere is on 32nm where as Bloomfield/Nehalem is on 45nm. They are both on the same architecture. Only the manufacturing process differs. Generally, the 32nm CPUs should run cooler.

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Dedicated Servers, webhost, VPS units, VPN's, number crunchers, etc.

I assume those are running as VMs?

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The ones I've been building have had 100TB disk space, 2 quad/six-core processors, and a minimum of 24-48 gigs of ram. High-end machines.

I'm sorry, but this looks like a Blade server. Exactly HOW do you plan to get 100TB of storage?

Imo, it would probably be MUCH more economical to get a Dell/HP/IBM server than to go DIY in this case. Not saying it's impossible, but I don't think it will cost less or have much quality difference between an OEM and a DIY. If you are in the market for a mission critical server, get a Dell or better yet, an IBM. Dell and HP server line ups a VASTLY different in quality compared to their consumer line up.

edit:

I just looked at some of your other posts, and I strongly recommend you NOT go DIY. I do not believe you understand exactly what needs to be done. I'm sorry if I offend you.
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