bloomfield vs. westmere [xeon processor]

Im looking at two different quad-core xeons on 1366 mobos one is bloomfield the other is westmere.

What are your opinions between the two (in terms of quality, reliability, and performance)?

Any help is appreciated.
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More about bloomfield westmere xeon processor
  1. As far as I know, both of them are desktop variants.Yorkfield is LGA 775 and Lynnfield is LGA 1156.
  2. +1. There are Xeon variants of Yorkfield and Lynnfield, but neither of them are on 1366 mobo's.
  3. Just realized I was looking at 775 cpus >_<

    In that case, what are your opinions on bloomfield vs westmere?
  4. Some background on what you are trying to achieve might be helpful.
  5. Dedicated Servers, webhost, VPS units, VPN's, number crunchers, etc.

    The ones I've been building have had 100TB disk space, 2 quad/six-core processors, and a minimum of 24-48 gigs of ram. High-end machines.
  6. I don't think that LGA 775 six-core processors are available.You can have a quad core processor at most with LGA 775
  7. From what I understand you want to upgrade the entire platform, right?
  8. dEAne I'm not buying a pre-manufactured server so that is irrelevant.

    Tamz, westmere and bloomfield make LGA 1366 processors.

    Herr, yes this is for new builds.
  9. Quote:

    Tamz, westmere and bloomfield make LGA 1366 processors.

    Intel makes those. Westmere and Bloomfield are die/architecture revisions.

    As far as the differences goes, Westmere is on 32nm where as Bloomfield/Nehalem is on 45nm. They are both on the same architecture. Only the manufacturing process differs. Generally, the 32nm CPUs should run cooler.

    Quote:
    Dedicated Servers, webhost, VPS units, VPN's, number crunchers, etc.

    I assume those are running as VMs?

    Quote:

    The ones I've been building have had 100TB disk space, 2 quad/six-core processors, and a minimum of 24-48 gigs of ram. High-end machines.

    I'm sorry, but this looks like a Blade server. Exactly HOW do you plan to get 100TB of storage?

    Imo, it would probably be MUCH more economical to get a Dell/HP/IBM server than to go DIY in this case. Not saying it's impossible, but I don't think it will cost less or have much quality difference between an OEM and a DIY. If you are in the market for a mission critical server, get a Dell or better yet, an IBM. Dell and HP server line ups a VASTLY different in quality compared to their consumer line up.

    edit:

    I just looked at some of your other posts, and I strongly recommend you NOT go DIY. I do not believe you understand exactly what needs to be done. I'm sorry if I offend you.
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