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Reinstalling XP? ? ?

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 25, 2004 9:24:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
Windows XP Home. I've never used it.

It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.

My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied together
by some sort of code.

Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?

Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use the
Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.

More about : reinstalling

Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 25, 2004 9:24:40 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

>My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
>Windows XP Home. I've never used it.
>
>It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.
>
>My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied together
>by some sort of code.
>
>Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?
>
>Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use the
>Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.
>
You'll be fine. XP is tied to the BIOS.
Even if you go it on another box the OS would lockup in 29 days since
you can't activate it.
November 25, 2004 10:45:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:36:47 -0500, AndrewJ
<andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>>My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
>>Windows XP Home. I've never used it.
>>
>>It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.
>>
>>My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied together
>>by some sort of code.
>>
>>Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?
>>
>>Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use the
>>Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.
>>
>You'll be fine. XP is tied to the BIOS.
>Even if you go it on another box the OS would lockup in 29 days since
>you can't activate it.

Are you sure that XP is tied to the BIOS? And if you are, can you
explain just what that means? I ask because I recently had to
reinstall XP Home on my old computer that had a failure of the
motherboard. So I replaced the MB, and the RAM, but put back in the
old hard drives, which had Win 98 SE and Win XP installed. I rebooted
it in Win 98, and went through a lot of installing new drivers until
the system was running right, so much so that I decided to go with a
"New" installation of XP. So I erased the partition on which XP was
installed, and reinstalled from the CD, and it went very smooth, no
problem whatever. I also had no problem with activation of it. So if
it's tied to the BIOS, I can't figure out how, since the two
motherboards had completely different BIOS.
---
Charlie Hoffpauir
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 26, 2004 12:06:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Charlie wrote:

> On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:36:47 -0500, AndrewJ
> <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>>My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
>>>Windows XP Home. I've never used it.
>>>
>>>It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.
>>>
>>>My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied
>>>together by some sort of code.
>>>
>>>Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?
>>>
>>>Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use the
>>>Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.
>>>
>>You'll be fine. XP is tied to the BIOS.
>>Even if you go it on another box the OS would lockup in 29 days since
>>you can't activate it.
>
> Are you sure that XP is tied to the BIOS? And if you are, can you
> explain just what that means? I ask because I recently had to
> reinstall XP Home on my old computer that had a failure of the
> motherboard. So I replaced the MB, and the RAM, but put back in the
> old hard drives, which had Win 98 SE and Win XP installed. I rebooted
> it in Win 98, and went through a lot of installing new drivers until
> the system was running right, so much so that I decided to go with a
> "New" installation of XP. So I erased the partition on which XP was
> installed, and reinstalled from the CD, and it went very smooth, no
> problem whatever. I also had no problem with activation of it. So if
> it's tied to the BIOS, I can't figure out how, since the two
> motherboards had completely different BIOS.

It's possible that the computer vendor keys their OEM copies to the BIOS in
some way. If they provide a recovery disk instead of the OS disk then even
if the OS is not keyed to the BIOS the recovery disk may be.

> ---
> Charlie Hoffpauir
> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
November 26, 2004 12:06:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 21:06:46 -0500, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>It's possible that the computer vendor keys their OEM copies to the BIOS in
>some way. If they provide a recovery disk instead of the OS disk then even
>if the OS is not keyed to the BIOS the recovery disk may be.
>

Yes, I guess that could be it. I was using an OEM copy of XP, but it
was one I purchased when I built the computer, not a recovery disc.
If that is the case,then I guess that explains why vendors who used to
provide a CD of Windows, now only provide the special partition on the
hard drive, or a recovery CD.

---
Charlie Hoffpauir
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 26, 2004 8:06:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

OEMs (laptop mfgrs.) have two choices:

-They can tie to the bios, in which case product activation is not required

OR

-They can have a system that is more or less "unlocked" but that does
Product Activation (with a 25-character product key) like a retail or
OEM copy of Windows XP.

Either way, you can't use the discs to install XP on multiple systems.
But, either way, it's not tied to the hard drive, so in that regard,
your hard drive replacement should not present a problem.

[Note, if product activation is done, when the PA code generates the
"hardware hash" that identifies the machine, it will generate a code
that is identical to that previously generated (when the machine was new
and 1st activated) except for the hard drive component. Product
activation allows at least 3 components to change. Thus, a change in
only the hard drive component will not prevent [re-]activation.


Charlie wrote:

> On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:36:47 -0500, AndrewJ
> <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>>My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
>>>Windows XP Home. I've never used it.
>>>
>>>It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.
>>>
>>>My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied together
>>>by some sort of code.
>>>
>>>Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?
>>>
>>>Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use the
>>>Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.
>>>
>>
>>You'll be fine. XP is tied to the BIOS.
>>Even if you go it on another box the OS would lockup in 29 days since
>>you can't activate it.
>
>
> Are you sure that XP is tied to the BIOS? And if you are, can you
> explain just what that means? I ask because I recently had to
> reinstall XP Home on my old computer that had a failure of the
> motherboard. So I replaced the MB, and the RAM, but put back in the
> old hard drives, which had Win 98 SE and Win XP installed. I rebooted
> it in Win 98, and went through a lot of installing new drivers until
> the system was running right, so much so that I decided to go with a
> "New" installation of XP. So I erased the partition on which XP was
> installed, and reinstalled from the CD, and it went very smooth, no
> problem whatever. I also had no problem with activation of it. So if
> it's tied to the BIOS, I can't figure out how, since the two
> motherboards had completely different BIOS.
> ---
> Charlie Hoffpauir
> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
November 26, 2004 3:02:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Barry Watzman wrote:

> OEMs (laptop mfgrs.) have two choices:
>
> -They can tie to the bios, in which case product activation is not
> required
>
> OR
>
> -They can have a system that is more or less "unlocked" but that does
> Product Activation (with a 25-character product key) like a retail or
> OEM copy of Windows XP.
>
> Either way, you can't use the discs to install XP on multiple systems.
> But, either way, it's not tied to the hard drive, so in that regard,
> your hard drive replacement should not present a problem.
>
> [Note, if product activation is done, when the PA code generates the
> "hardware hash" that identifies the machine, it will generate a code
> that is identical to that previously generated (when the machine was new
> and 1st activated) except for the hard drive component. Product
> activation allows at least 3 components to change. Thus, a change in
> only the hard drive component will not prevent [re-]activation.

Unless it does. The other day I had my XP machine decide that it needed
reactivation for no apparent reason.

> Charlie wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:36:47 -0500, AndrewJ
>> <andrewjbbrREMOVE@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>>My two-year-old laptop came with the usual recovery discs to reinstall
>>>>Windows XP Home. I've never used it.
>>>>
>>>>It now looks as if I'l have to replace the HDD and reinstall.
>>>>
>>>>My question is whether the old HDD and the recovery discs are tied
>>>>together by some sort of code.
>>>>
>>>>Or will I run into problems reinstalling Win XP?
>>>>
>>>>Seems there would be some sort of code, because otherwise I could use
>>>>the Recovery disc to install Win XP in more than one laptop.
>>>>
>>>
>>>You'll be fine. XP is tied to the BIOS.
>>>Even if you go it on another box the OS would lockup in 29 days since
>>>you can't activate it.
>>
>>
>> Are you sure that XP is tied to the BIOS? And if you are, can you
>> explain just what that means? I ask because I recently had to
>> reinstall XP Home on my old computer that had a failure of the
>> motherboard. So I replaced the MB, and the RAM, but put back in the
>> old hard drives, which had Win 98 SE and Win XP installed. I rebooted
>> it in Win 98, and went through a lot of installing new drivers until
>> the system was running right, so much so that I decided to go with a
>> "New" installation of XP. So I erased the partition on which XP was
>> installed, and reinstalled from the CD, and it went very smooth, no
>> problem whatever. I also had no problem with activation of it. So if
>> it's tied to the BIOS, I can't figure out how, since the two
>> motherboards had completely different BIOS.
>> ---
>> Charlie Hoffpauir
>> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
November 26, 2004 7:08:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

[copied]
Getting the Windows XP Product Key:
You need first to get the product key for the Win XP copy which you have paid
for when you purchased your computer.

1- Check at the back of your computer and look for a Windows sticker with a
product key. Write down this key on a piece of paper.

Note: If you did not find that sticker, it is probably included with the
documentation package that came with your computer. If it is not there, call
the computer's manufacturer and ask for it.

Note: If you used that product key on the sticker to install Win XP, you will
need to activate your windows by calling Microsoft. To bypass the activation,
follow the instructions below.

1- Go to folder i386 and search for this file unattend.txt.
2- Open that file using any text editor (e.g. WordPad, NotePad, ...) and search
a line starts with ProductKey.
3- Write down the key number in that line on a piece of paper.
4- Use this product key during the installation instead of the one you got from
the sticker.
5- You will not be asked to activate your windows.
!