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New system build IDE & ACHI

Last response: in Storage
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October 27, 2012 6:48:05 PM

Hello Community!

I recently bought some new parts for a work computer, new Motherboard, RAM, CPU and PSU
However I didn't change the harddrive - for your information it's running winXP and it's an old IDE harddrive.
The Motherboard that i use does not have an IDE input, so i bought a converter from IDE to SATA.

So i connect the HDD up to my new MB and it just wont start. Then I read up on IDE and ACHI, and it turns out that MSI (The manufacturer of my MB) had made some ACHI drivers for windows XP 32bit - HURRAY! The only problem is that, when I try to install them on the old machine with the old HDD, then Windows gives me a notification telling me that my system does not meet the minimum requirements.

Is there any possibility to use the same HDD or clone it to another newer one and installing the drivers on that?
I basically would like to avoid re installing the OS, since some of the vital programs that we use in the company are stored on that HD, and no one has seen the installation discs since 2005.

More about : system build ide achi

a b V Motherboard
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October 28, 2012 2:27:16 AM

First of all, AHCI cannot be used on an IDE drive. AHCI is a communication and control system used with SATA drives, but not IDE. You should NOT be trying to install AHCI drivers on your new machine or on the old IDE drive containing the XP OS.

In BIOS Setup, go to where you configure the SATA ports. Near them there ought to be a line to set the SATA Port Mode, with options like IDE Emulation, RAID, and AHCI. Set it to IDE Emulation. In this mode, the mobo BIOS limits the method of using the drive on that port to only those things that an IDE drive can do. What you have on the SATA port is an IDE drive, so this should be the way to set it up. Win XP knows how to use any IDE drive, so this works. In fact, because Win XP does not know how to use AHCI devices without added drivers, this little work-around built into BIOS is the simple way to use a SATA drive with XP - it was designed to limit an actual SATA unit to behave like an IDE unit that XP can handle.

Read the instructions that came with the converter carefully. The jumper on the IDE drive must be set correctly to either Master or Slave. I suspect that Master is correct, but read what the info tells you to do.
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