Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

[New Build] Mid-Tier (?) Gaming PC

Tags:
Last response: in Systems
Share
August 6, 2010 2:58:28 PM

I've been lurking these forums for the past 10 days trying to come up with a "nice" build to facilitate Starcraft 2 (the notebook ain't cuttin it...lol). Anyway, thanks to all of the input and feedback you all provide for other posters, I have been able to piece together my system.

I took this entire week to research and order, when I was sure of what I wanted. Therefore, I am waiting on parts to arrive, and I should have everything by the middle of next week.

Here is what I settled on:
Lian Li PC-FNW (Black Aluminum)
ASUS P7P55D-E Pro (Intel) Motherboard
Intel Core i5-760
EVGA GeForce GTX 460 Superclocked EE 1GB 256-bit GDDR5
G.Skill Trident 4GB (2x2GB)
ASUS DVD-RW
Samsung Spinpoint 1TB 7200 RPM
Corsair 650W

Total Spent: $1060.89

Well my main question before I get to building, was regarding a cooling unit for the processor. Do my specs warrant a 3rd party cooler? I've never overclocked (other than my droid...lol), so I'm not too sure when I will get into that. So for a basic build, do I need to look into a cooler for the CPU? Is there anything else that I am missing or that I should consider?

Thanks in advance for your responses.

More about : build mid tier gaming

August 6, 2010 3:02:46 PM

The CPU will come with a factory cooler, which is adequate for keeping the CPU cool without overclock. If you are not overclocking there is no need for a 3rd party cooler.
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:05:41 PM

jared51182 said:
The CPU will come with a factory cooler, which is adequate for keeping the CPU cool without overclock. If you are not overclocking there is no need for a 3rd party cooler.


Thanks for the fast response. If I do decide to overclock, is it overly difficult to remove the stock cooler to replace with a 3rd party cooler?
m
0
l
Related resources
August 6, 2010 3:08:42 PM

That would mostly depend on if you use thermal paste and the CPU gets stuck to the stock cooler. However, it should not be difficult and there are tutorials and such about installing 3rd party coolers.

Even if you use paste it can be removed, cleaned up, re-applied. If you end up deciding to OC, you will want to use thermal paste when you install the new cooler.
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:17:42 PM

jared51182 said:
That would mostly depend on if you use thermal paste and the CPU gets stuck to the stock cooler. However, it should not be difficult and there are tutorials and such about installing 3rd party coolers.

Even if you use paste it can be removed, cleaned up, re-applied. If you end up deciding to OC, you will want to use thermal paste when you install the new cooler.


Ok...you opened more questions. Does the paste have to be used? And what is the benefit or risk of using/not using the paste?
m
0
l

Best solution

August 6, 2010 3:22:20 PM

The paste does NOT have to be used. It is basically a gel that is applied between the surface of the CPU and the (usually) aluminum or copper base of the cooler. The paste is designed to allow for a more uniform contact between the CPU (heat producer) and the Cooler (heat sink and dissipation).

The benefit is a more even and quick cooling of a CPU while under load, which is why is it highly recommended for overclocking.

The risk is that the cooling will not be as efficient, and if under high load can cause excess heat to remain within the CPU.

However, under normal use, this generally is not a problem.

I will note that a lot of home builders use it as it is relatively cheap, and provides benefits at low cost.
Share
August 6, 2010 3:25:21 PM

Best answer selected by Bud2003.
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:27:10 PM
August 6, 2010 3:29:41 PM

mrhoshos96 said:
great build but don't get the superclocked ee it aint worth the extra $$

here is an intel build for $915.93 BR and $875.93 AR and it's sli ready

mobo+ram: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

gpu+cpu: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

case+psu: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

hdd: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

odd: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


He bought the parts and is waiting for them to arrive. So.......
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:29:49 PM

Thanks for the responses...

Lastly, what do you think of the build? Any foreseeable bottlenecks?

I am a little nervous with this being my first build and all.
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:32:11 PM

Like Mrhoshos said, its a great build. He also points out that you could have saved some here and there. however, you made a firm decision, don't regret your build dude. You will love your new computer! :) 
m
0
l
August 6, 2010 3:35:00 PM

Thanks for your help guys! I was mostly apprehensive about the case purchase...but I liked the thought of the aluminum build.

Anyway, I appreciate your help!
m
0
l
August 12, 2010 5:35:32 PM

I finally got all my parts in and I am planning to assembly everything this weekend. I did have one question though. Is the Corsair 650W PSU enough for my build?

I've been reading some other builds that seem similar to mine, and they have higher watt units. Is my 650W enough?
m
0
l
August 12, 2010 5:46:16 PM

Yes, the PSU will be sufficient. 650W should be enough to even SLI the 460, but you likely see people putting in 750W's with their build with the intention of dual-GPUs in the future. But, like I said, the 650W should be able to SLI two 460s, so yes, your current PSU will be sufficient.

I used the power calculator at eXtreme Power Supply and it came out to 406 Watts. So you should be good. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Edit: Also, if you SLI, it bumps it up to 574W under my calculation. So you would still be good.
m
0
l
August 12, 2010 5:56:48 PM

jared51182 said:
Yes, the PSU will be sufficient. 650W should be enough to even SLI the 460, but you likely see people putting in 750W's with their build with the intention of dual-GPUs in the future. But, like I said, the 650W should be able to SLI two 460s, so yes, your current PSU will be sufficient.

I used the power calculator at eXtreme Power Supply and it came out to 406 Watts. So you should be good. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Edit: Also, if you SLI, it bumps it up to 574W under my calculation. So you would still be good.


Great!!! Thanks for the feedback...you are too kind. Now wish me luck on putting this thing together!
m
0
l
August 12, 2010 6:00:00 PM

Yes, Good Luck! If you are unsure of what to do, there is a link in my sig that goes to a video of one of the Tom's Members and his build. You can watch the 3 or so videos, each about 5 minutes I think, just to get an idea.

But GOOD LUCK!
m
0
l
August 14, 2010 4:45:18 PM

Ok...I've got everything assembled, and it looks neat and clean (to my surprise). I powered up, got the one beep, my CPU fan and exhaust fan is spinning, but the front vent fan isn't spinning. It is plugged into the CHA-FAN2 slot on my mobo.

Also, I have my monitor hooked up, but I get no picture other than the floating red/green/blue image.

Any ideas?
m
0
l
August 14, 2010 4:47:31 PM

Nevermind on the missing monitor image. I have one now.

However, the fan is still not spinning. Any ideas? I have a ASUS P7P55D-E Pro.

Thanks!
m
0
l
!